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Topic: Sassanians


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  Iransaga - Persian Art, The Sassanians
Sassanian art revived forms and traditions native to Persia; and in the Islamic period these reached the shores of the Mediterranean.
The splendour in which the Sassanian monarchs lived is well illustrated by their surviving palaces, such as those at Firuzabad and Bishapur in Fars, and the capital city of Ctesiphon in Mesopotamia.
The Sassanian architect conceived his building in terms of masses and surfaces; hence the use of massive walls of brick decorated with molded or carved stucco.
www.art-arena.com /sass1.htm   (606 words)

  
  F. The Neo-Persian Empire of the Sassanians, 223-651 C.E. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Sassanian society was divided into the traditional Iranian estates: priest (magian), noble (azatan), and farmer (ram); the last estate also included traders, craftsmen, and bureaucrats.
In the late Sassanian period, the kingdom was divided into four large divisions headed by a military and civil authority.
The court of the Sassanian king was famous for its elaborate protocol and hierarchy of officials in which the priests played an important role.
www.bartleby.com /67/271.html   (879 words)

  
 Visual Arts: The Art of Sassanians
The greatest territorial extension of the Sassanian empire and the last apogee of its artistic activities were reached in the time of Khusraw II (591-628 CE), a well known figure in the history and legend of the West, who had taken the Holy Cross from Jerusalem to his capital, Ctesiphon.
Resistance of the Sassanians was broken in the battle of Nihavend in 642 CE.
Bust of a Sassanian King, 5th-7th Century CE Thus the horses bend their necks as in the Achaemenid reliefs of Persepolis, although the loose reins in the present rendering show that this is merely one part of a pictorial formula.
www.iranchamber.com /art/articles/art_of_sassanians.php   (10517 words)

  
 Sassanian Iran   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Sassanian architecture used rough-hewn stone and mortar in the heartland and brick in Mesopotamia.
The Sassanians, however, unlike in the Achaemenian palaces at Persepolis, made extensive use of stucco, which in time has resulted in the loss of the majesty of their triple aivans.
Sassanian art, profoundly influenced by the developments in Greece and Rome, on the one hand, and India and China, on the other is an example of cooperation among people who never met but who communicated through art.
www.iles.umn.edu /faculty/bashiri/Sassanian/Sassan.html   (2245 words)

  
 Afghanistan - Central Asian and Sassanian Rule, ca. 150 B.C.-700 A.D.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
These small kingdoms were pressed by both the Sassanians from the west and by the growing strength of the Guptas, an Indian dynasty established at the beginning of the fourth century.
The disunited Kushan and Sassanian kingdoms were in a poor position to meet the threat of a new wave of nomadic, Indo-European invaders from the north.
By the middle of the sixth century the Hepthalites were defeated in the territories north of the Amu Darya (the Oxus River of antiquity) by another group of Central Asian nomads, the Western Turks, and by the resurgent Sassanians in the lands south of the Amu Darya.
www.country-data.com /cgi-bin/query/r-6.html   (489 words)

  
 sassan
During their reign the Sassanians succeeded in expanding the frontiers of Iran (approaching at times the vast frontiers of Achaemenid Iran), and served repeatedly as the principal rivals of Rome.
Many of the features of Sassanian art survived the collapse of the Sassanian state, however, and went on to form the basis for the art and architecture of Islamic Iran.
Considered a masterpiece of Sassanian sculpture, the life-size figure of a chain-mailed warrior preparing for battle is nearly free of the background panel.
www.partow.com /sassan.html   (392 words)

  
 Iransaga - Persian Art, The Sassanians
Sassanian sculpture affords an equally striking contrast to that of Greece and Rome.
The earliest known Sassanian rock carvings are those at Firuzabad, attributed to the beginning of Ardashir I's reign and still bound to the conventions of Parthian art.
Sassanian art was carried over an immense territory stretching from the Far East to the shores of the Atlantic and played a foremost role in the formation of both European and Asiatic medieval art.
www.art-arena.com /sass2.htm   (881 words)

  
 PersianDNA™  [THE SASSANIANS] The History of The Sassanians
It was not until the reign of Khosroe I (531-579), one of the greatest Sassanian rulers, that the Huns were beaten.
The splendor in which the Sassanian monarchs lived is well illustrated by their surviving palaces, such as those at Firuzabad and Bishapur in Fars, and the capital city of Ctesiphon in Mesopotamia.
The Sassanian sculptures commemorate an event by depicting symbolically the culminating incident: for instance in the sculpture at Naksh-i-Rustam (3rd c.) the Roman emperor Valerian hands over his arms to the victor Shapur I. Divine and royal personages are portrayed on a scale larger than that of inferior persons.
www.persiandna.com /his_sassa.htm   (1575 words)

  
 Iran History -Sassanians
The Sassanians were the true heirs of the Achaemenians.
In the second period, the great figures were Khosrow I (531-579), perhaps the most illustrious of all the Sassanian kings, and Khosrow Parviz (590-628), conqueror of Jerusalem, invader of Egypt glorified in legend for his amours but in fact brutal, cowardly and fairly incompetent.
Ardashir I was the founder of the Sassanian dynasty.
www.irantour.org /Iran/history/The%20Sassanians.html   (626 words)

  
 Taq-e-Bustan
It was customary for Sassanian Emperors to have their investiture carved in a prominent location on a mountain side immortalizing events of their reign.
Sassanians were acquainted with the practice of placing a relief or statue in a niche or a cave.
Sassanians, as Zoroastrians did not pollute earth by burying their dead thus placing them in caskets made of stone, ceramic or practiced sky burial.
www.vohuman.org /SlideShow/Taq-e-Bustan/Taq-e-Bustan-Main.htm   (917 words)

  
 Sassanid dynasty
The governmental structure of the Sassanian Persia was centralized, where local rulers were removed early in the dynasty's history.
The state religion of the Sassanians was Zoroastrianism, and the religion was closely linked to the state.
The Sassanian rulers had built many great monuments, of which the ones at Ctesiphon, Firuzabad and Sarvestan are especially noted.
www.lexicorient.com /e.o/sassanid.htm   (1279 words)

  
 Histroy of Iran
It was not until the reign of Khosroe I (531-579), one of the greatest Sassanian rulers, that the Huns were beaten.
After his death, over a period of 14 years and twelve successive kings, the Sassanian Empire weakened considerably, and the power of the central authority passed into the hands of the generals.
The splendor in which the Sassanian monarchs lived is well illustrated by their surviving palaces, such as those at Firuzabad and Bishapur in Fars, and the capital city of Ctesiphon in Mesopotamia.
www.farhangsara.com /history_sassanians.htm   (1608 words)

  
 Articles - Indo-Sassanian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Indo-Sassanians or Kushano-Sassanians are a branch of the Sassanians who established their rule in the northwestern Indian subcontinent during the 3rd and the 4th century CE, and later between the 6th and 10th century.
The Sassanians, shortly after their victory over the Parthians, extended their dominion into Bactria around 230 CE during the reign of Ardashir I, and then into Kushan territory (what is today Pakistan and northwestern India) during the reign of his son Shapur I (240-270 CE).
The example of Sassanian art was influencial on Kushan art, and this influence remained active for several centuries in the northwest Indian subcontinent.
www.epsona.com /articles/Indo-Sassanian   (556 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Furthermore, the Sassanians were eager to discover new grounds but, within that effort, too, they emphasized the Iranian roots of their music.
Following the Sassanian model, Samanid officials reestablished a new musical culture, a synthesis of poetry and music that affected performance, instruction, publication, and development of the arts in general.
It should be emphasized that, during the Sassanian era, the poet and the musician were often the same person.
www.iles.umn.edu /faculty/bashiri/Borbad/Rajabzod.html   (2361 words)

  
 Untitled Document
In the middle is a late Sassanian commander knight (Framandar) and to the left is the Marzban of Abarshahr who has drawn his sword.
The Sassanian knights were not only warriors, but also scholars and artists, fond of learning.
It was the elite cavalry of Sassanian Persia who were the forerunners of the later Medieval European knights, the Arabian Faris, the Caucasian horsemen, the Indian Suwar (derived from Persian Savar), and the Turkish Tarkhans.
www.rozanehmagazine.com /SeptOct05/asassanianFarrokh.html   (715 words)

  
 Battle Reports February 2004
Three Sassanian brigades came into view consisting almost entirely of EHC and HC, with a couple of infantry skirmishers in the central brigade and 1 elephant in each of the flank commands, which was bad news.
As the Sassanians came into range the stationary HA shot a hail of arrows in their direction, inflicting four casualties and then flinching at the 13 hits they took from the advancing foe.
As the Sassanians reserve moved to the flank, the Parthian infantry followed to shoot, which was unfortunate as they left their hill as the Sassanians, seeing the flanking force disposed of with ease, began to turn back.
www.visbellica.com /BatRep/battle_reports_february_2004.htm   (3909 words)

  
 An Overview of the Sassanian Persian Military   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
This is certainly the case with the Sassanian (also known as Sassanid) dynasty of Iran, an empire which at one time ruled from the Indus to the Nile, from Yemen to the Caucasus.
Sassanian forces on that occasion wore a palm tree insignia and are generally described as highly disciplined.
The Sassanians appear to have attempted a revival of Achaemenid practices overall, and this doubtless extended to the activities of the infantry.
pchome.grm.hia.no /~fsaljoug/SassMil.htm   (5498 words)

  
 4Reference || Pre-Islamic period of Afghanistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
These small kingdoms were pressed by both the Sassanians from the west and by the growing strength of the Guptas, an Indian dynasty established at the beginning of the 4th century.
The Hepthalites (or White Huns) swept out of Central Asia around the fourth century into Bactria and to the south, overwhelming the last of the Kushan and Sassanian kingdoms.
Up until the advent of Islam, the lands of the Hindu Kush were dominated up to the Amu Darya by small kingdoms under Sassanian control but with local rulers who were Kushans or Hepthalites.
www.4reference.net /encyclopedias/wikipedia/Pre_Islamic_period_of_Afghanistan.html   (1020 words)

  
 Afghanistan Country Study
Although the Sassanians conquered as far east as the Punjab, by the middle of the third century most of the kingdoms that were fragments of the Kushan Empire were in practice semiindependent.
These small kingdoms were pressed not only by the Sassanians from the west but also from the Indian subcontinent by the growing strength of the Guptas, a dynasty established in northern and central India as early as the beginning of the fourth century.
The disunited Kushan and Sassanian kingdoms were in a bad position to meet the threat of a new wave of nomadic, Indo-European invaders from the north.
www.gl.iit.edu /govdocs/afghanistan/PreIslamic.html   (1464 words)

  
 Persian History- Iranian History
The Sassanians considered themselves as heirs of the Achaemenids and revived old values and practices, in particular supremacy in world affairs.
Bahram II is reputed to have seized the Throne by political intrigues, led by the chief priest Kerdir and the nobles.
Khosrow II came close to achieving the Sassanian dream of restoring the Achaemenid boundaries when Jerusalem fell to him and constantinople was under his siege.
oznet.net /iran/hist-intro.htm   (1201 words)

  
 The Sassanians
The Sassanians came to power in AD 224 when the first of their rulers, Ardashir I, defeated the last Parthian king, Artabanus V, in a battle which was commemorated in a huge rock relief close to his own capital city and palace at Firuzabad, in the central province of Fars (Persis).
The Sassanians were thus the major power that opposed the Romans along their eastern frontier.
The most familiar aspects of their history are the wars and campaigns which they fought with the later Roman emperors, and which are commemorated in a stunning series of historical rock reliefs set up to celebrate Sassanian victories.
latis.ex.ac.uk /classics/visualessays/iran/thesassanians.htm   (180 words)

  
 Changes in Zarathushtra's Teachings, during the Parthian & Sasanian Periods
The Zarthusti clergy and the church during the Sassanian time is believed to have been affluent and it was around 487 CE that the Mazdakite, a communist movement gained momentum.
Although this movement was at first looked favourably by the Sassanians, the opposition from Zarthusti clerics and nobles ensured the end of the Mazdakite heresy through proclamation of death sentence for the prophet.
According to Dhalla, "the early Sasanian writers seem seldom to have been free from the theological predispositions." The Avesta was considered the word of Ormazd and it was necessary to keep the divine word living among the people that the original language now unintelligible to the poor should be rendered into the existing vernacular.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/Religions/iranian/Zarathushtrian/zarathushtras_teachings.htm   (2125 words)

  
 Huns and Indo-Sassanians
These Huns were instrumental in circulating the currency of Sassanian types for the first time in India.
It was around the same time, the Sassanian dynasty seems to have ruled the western part of India which owed their allegiance to the Persians.
The degenerated Sassanian type of coin drawn on the base silver piece must have served as their earlier currency.
prabhu.50g.com /pstgupta/pstgup_hun.html   (200 words)

  
 502-506. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Khusrau's unsuccessful siege of Edessa (544) led to a five-year truce which was broken when the Byzantines invaded and eventually retook Lazica (549–555).
A fifty-year peace was concluded with the Byzantines in 561 in which Lazica was recognized as Roman in exchange for an annual payment in gold to the Sassanians.
Allied with the Turks of Transoxiana, Khusrau finally brought an end to Hephthalite power.
www.bartleby.com /67/274.html   (481 words)

  
 [No title]
In 624, the Jews fought with the Sassanians to conquer the land of Israel, and, in doing so, as part of the messianic fervor that accompanied such a conquest, they massacred many Christians who lived there.
In 651, the last Sassanian king was killed and the Jews of Babylonia were then under the authority of the Muslims.
Appointed by and accountable to the Sassanian government, he and his administration mediated relations between the Jews and the state.
www.hebroots.org /hebrootsarchive/9804/980407_f.html   (2622 words)

  
 Kingdom of Persis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Mithradates II was able to incorporate Persis as a sub-kingdom of the Parthian empire during the early 1st century BC, though Persis continued to mint its own distinctive series of coins which gradually took on some of the appearance of Parthian coins.
Persis was eventually able to defeat the Arsacids and, under Ardashir I, found the Sassanian empire, which was to become Rome's, and later Byzantium's, greatest foe until the appearance of Islam and the Arab conquest of the Middle East during the 7th century AD.
Tetradrachm of Ardashir I, founder of the Sassanian empire.
americanhistory.si.edu /collections/numismatics/parthia/frames/persis.htm   (147 words)

  
 History of Central Asia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Turks and Sassanians ally to destroy the Hephthalite Empire.
The Sassanian Shah Yazdigird is defeated by the Arabs at the Battle of Nahavand.
The collapse of the Sassanian Empire under the pressure of Arab raids.
members.tripod.com /~kz2000/history/chron1.htm   (1959 words)

  
 History of ZOROASTRIANISM   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The situation improves dramatically with the fall of the Parthian dynasty, and the rise of the Sassanians, in the 3rd century AD.
His father is in charge of a Zoroastrian temple in the region of the ruined Persepolis before he kills the local ruler and takes his place.
The new king is proud of one particular ancestor, Sassan; his dynasty becomes known as Sassanian.
www.historyworld.net /wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ab71   (888 words)

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