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Topic: Sassanid dynasty


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In the News (Fri 21 Jun 19)

  
  Sassanid dynasty
Dynasty of Ancient Iran (224- 651 CE), which at its largest covered an area of modern Iran and Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia and large parts of Pakistan.
After the fall of the dynasty, and the arrival of Muslim rulers over the old Iranian territories, Zoroastrianism would gradually loose its importance.
Despite the conflicts, this year is defined as the beginning of the Sassanid Dynasty.
www.lexicorient.com /e.o/sassanid.htm   (1267 words)

  
  Sassanid Empire information - Search.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Sassanid dynasty was founded by Ardashir I after defeating the last Arsacid king, Artabanus IV and ended when the last Sassanid Shahanshah (King of Kings), Yazdegerd III (632–651), lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the early Caliphate, the first of the Islamic empires.
The Sassanid Dynasty was established by Ardashir I (226–241), a descendant of a line of the priests of Anahita in Staxr, Persis (or Fars) who at the beginning of the third century had acquired the governorship of Persis.
The first encounter between Sassanids and Muslim Arabs was in the Battle of the Bridge in 634 which resulted in a Sassanid victory, however the Arab threat did not stop there and reappeared shortly from the disciplined armies of Khalid ibn Walid, once one of Muhammad's chosen companion-in-arms and leader of the Arab army.
c10-ss-1-lb.cnet.com /reference/Sassanid_Empire?redir=1   (10363 words)

  
  ScienceDaily: Sassanid dynasty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Sassanid dynasty (Sassanian in Persian: ساسانیان) was the name given to the kings of Persia (Iran), during the era of the third Persian Empire, from 224 until 651.
In the spring of 632, a grandson of Khosrau, Yazdegerd III, ascended the throne.
Sassanid influence didn't remain confined to its borders.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/sassanid_dynasty   (7182 words)

  
 Sassanid dynasty - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Sassanids wanted to recreate the glories of ancient Persia and claimed to Persianise the country, however due to unknown reasons they didn't cite anything about the former Persian empire of Achaemenids in their records or carvings.
Sassanid rule and the system of social stratification were reinforced by Zoroastrianism, which became the dominant religion, but not the official state religion, because other religions were still allowed (this is a controversially discussed topic, see for example Wiesehöfer, Ancient Persia, or the Cambridge History of Iran, vol 3).
Although the Kushan empire declined at the end of the 3rd century, leading to the rise to power of an indigenous Indian dynasty, the Guptas, in the 4th century, it is clear that Sassanid influence remained relevant in the north-west of India.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Sassanid   (5800 words)

  
 Sassanid dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Sassanid rule and the system of social stratification were reinforced by Zoroastrianism, which became the state religion.
Sassanid Emperors were conscious of their role as military leaders: many took part in battle, and some were killed; the Picture Book of Sassanid Kings showed them as warriors with lance or sword.
The later Sassanids were further weakened by economic decline, heavy taxation, religious unrest, rigid social stratification, the increasing power of the provincial landholders, and a rapid turnover of rulers.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Sassanid   (3477 words)

  
 History of Iran: Sassanid Empire
Sassanid rulers adopted the title of shahanshah (king of kings), as sovereigns over numerous petty rulers, known as shahrdars.
Sassanid rule and the system of social stratification were reinforced by Zoroastrianism, which became the state religion.
The later Sassanids were further weakened by economic decline, heavy taxation, religious unrest, rigid social stratification, the increasing power of the provincial landholders, and a rapid turnover of rulers.
www.iranchamber.com /history/sassanids/sassanids.php   (722 words)

  
 Sassanid Empire at AllExperts
The Sassanid era, encompassing the length of the Late Antiquity period, is considered to be one of the most important and influential historical periods in Iran.
The Sassanid Dynasty was established by Ardashir I (226–241), a descendant of a line of the priests of goddess Anahita in Istakhr, Persis (Pars) who at the beginning of the third century had acquired the governorship of Persis.
Sassanid society and civilization were among the most flourishing of their time, rivaled in their region only by the Byzantine civilisation.
en.allexperts.com /e/s/sa/sassanid_empire.htm   (10608 words)

  
 Al-Ahram Weekly | Culture | Elements of forgotten empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
From the evidence provided here, the Sassanid state was a highly centralised affair, focused on the figure of the king-emperor, the shahanshah eran, and it had a love affair with bureaucracy.
Sassanid glassware, the contents of another room in the exhibition, shows a high degree of technical expertise, and the "Cup of Solomon", made of glass and gold and one of the best- known objects to have survived from this period, has been lent by the Bibliothèque nationale de France for this exhibition.
However, it was perhaps during this period that Sassanid textiles began to circulate in Egypt, which would explain why fragments of them were discovered in the necropolis near the ancient city of Antinopolis (Sheikh Ibada) in Upper Egypt by French archaeologists at the end of the 19th century.
weekly.ahram.org.eg /2006/820/cu4.htm   (1211 words)

  
 SASSANID (DYNASTY) - LoveToKnow Article on SASSANID (DYNASTY)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
SASSANID, or SASSANIAN DYNASTY (or SASANIAN), the ruling dynasty of the neo-Persian empire founded by Ardashir I. in A.D. 226 and destroyed by the Arabs in 637.
On the overthrow of the Jadhav dynasty in 1312 the district passed to the Mahommedan power, which was consolidated in the reign of the Bahmani kings.
On the decline of the Bahmanis towards the end of the 15th century the Bijapur kings finally asserted themselves, and under these kings the Mahrattas arose and laid the foundation of an independent kingdom with Satara as its capital.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SA/SASSANID_DYNASTY_.htm   (2757 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) (named for Ardashir's grandfather) was the first dynasty native to the Pars province since the Achaemenids; thus they saw themselves as the successors of Darius and Cyrus.
The explosive growth of the Arab Caliphate coincided with the chaos caused by the defeat of Sassanids in wars with the Byzantine Empire.
The Safavid Dynasty hailed from the town of Ardabil in the region of Azarbaijan.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Persian_Empire   (5222 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Sassanid, Iran History (Iranian History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Under the Sassanids, who revived Achaemenid tradition, Zoroastrianism was reestablished as the state religion.
The name of the dynasty was derived from Sassan, an ancestor of the founder of the dynasty, Ardashir I, who took and ruled Ctesiphon (224–40).
Both countries were again overrun by Khosrow II (ruled 590–628), whose conquest of Egypt was the final victorious achievement of the dynasty.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/S/Sassanid.html   (384 words)

  
 Sassanid - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Sassanid Sasanid, or Sassanian, last dynasty of native rulers to reign in Persia before the Arab conquest.
The name of the dynasty was derived from Sassan, an ancestor of the founder of the dynasty, Ardashir I, who took and ruled Ctesiphon (224-40).
The Armenians were overwhelmed by Yazdagird II in 451, and their land was overrun by Sassanids under Khosrow I, who reigned 531-79 and who also invaded Syria.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc.aspx?id=1E1:Sassanid   (629 words)

  
 Sassanid dynasty - RecipeFacts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia, which includes much of present-day Iran, during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate, the first of the Islamic empires.
The head of the priestly class, the mobadan (magi), along with the military commander, the Iran (eran) spahbod, and the head of the bureaucracy, were among the great men of the state.
After The Sassanids came to power in Persia in 226 A.D. The second emperor, Shapur I (240-270), extended his authority eastwards into what is today Pakistan and northwestern India and the previously autonomous Kushans were obliged to accept his suzerainty.
www.recipeland.com /encyclopaedia/index.php/Sasanid   (3969 words)

  
 Chapter One - The Historical Background
Despite all its glittering achievements, the Sassanid Empire was characterised by extreme oppression of the downtrodden masses.
In 1920 Seyed Zia-al-din Taba Tabai, an Iranian politician, and Reza Khan, a cavalry officer, overthrew the Qajar dynasty.
In October 1925 Reza crowned himself Shah and became the founder of a new dynasty, the Pahlavis.
www.marxist.com /iran/chapter1.html   (3339 words)

  
 Taq-e Gara - fravahr.org
Taq-e Gara Fort built during the Sassanid era (226-651 AD) for controlling the western approaches to Iran leads to the city of Kermanshah and is strategically located overlooking of road.
During the Sassanid dynasty era, all caravans entering Iran from the west were controlled in Taq-e Gara.
Experts attribute the structure to the Sassanid era because the interior sections of the walls are filled with gravel and plaster mortar — a style prevalent during that period.
www.fravahr.org /spip.php?article241   (380 words)

  
 Antique Textile History
After the Sassanid period, due to the fact that the use of gold was prohibited for men, so weaving of this kind of cloth was almost stopped.
During the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties, court robes, rank badges, and Buddhist and Daoist Kesi were all used to denote status and wealth, as well as to express religious devotion.
It flourished in the Ming and Qing Dynasties.
www.textileasart.com /weaving.htm   (5171 words)

  
 Sassanid City of Bishapour Enclosed by Fences
It was the most significant city of the Sassanid dynasty, built on the Imperial Road in Fars Province, at the time of Shapour I (240-270 AD), the second Sassanid king.
The ruins of the historical city of Bishapour are found on the slope of Koohmareh heights, 23 kilometers west of the city of Kazeroon.
After the Arab conquest of the Persian Empire in 651 AD and the fall of the Sassanid Dynasty, Islamic architectural features were applied to parts of this Sassanid city, evidence of which has remained to this date.
www.payvand.com /news/06/nov/1245.html   (466 words)

  
 Talk:Sassanid dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The WikiProject Echo has identified that Sassanid dynasty is a foreign language featured article.
it seems that spelling 'sassanid' is more prevalent than 'sasanid' but instances of 'sasanian' outnumber that of 'sassanian.' i would tend towards using 'sasanid' and 'sasanian' myself as these spellings better represent the correct pronunciation.
it says in the article that Umayyad ended the the sassanid Empire which is worng, the Sassanids were ended under Caliph Umar who was one of the four rightoness Caliphs before the rise of the Ummayads for many years.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Sassanid_dynasty   (1353 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Persian Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Parthian's last ruler Artabanus IV had an initial success in putting together the crumbling state however the fate of Arsacid Dynasty was doomed when in AD 224, the Persian vassal king Ardashir revolted.
The Sassanid (or Sassanian) dynasty (named for Ardashir's grandfather) was the first native Persian ruling dynasty since the Achaemenids; thus they saw themselves as the successors of Darius and Cyrus.
Persia found relative stability in the Qajar dynasty, ruling from 1779 to 1925, but lost hope to compete with the new industrial powers of Europe; Persia found itself sandwiched between the growing Russian Empire in Central Asia and the expanding British Empire in India.
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref/index.php?title=Persian_Empire   (4658 words)

  
 Coins - IRAN COLLECTION
The Sassanid coins had an original Persian pattern and were minted in gold, silver and copper.
By the invasion of Arabs to Iran, the posy Islamic period began in the history of the empire; the Sassanid king was killed in Mary and the official religion of the country change from Zoroastrianism into Islam.
The Sassanid dynasty collapsed in 1750s A.D. by the invasion of Afghans and the country were in chaos for a few years.
irancollection.alborzi.com /coins.html   (1591 words)

  
 The Modern Magazine for Persian Weddings, Cuisine, Culture & Community
The Sassanids used Ctesiphon as their capital, and fought hard to revive Iranian heritage that had been suppressed by Greek culture.
The later rulers of this empire were weakened by economic decline, heavy taxation, religious unrest, and the increasing power of the dehghans.
In the east, the Kushan Dynasty was formed and in the west, the province of Persia gained more and more power.
www.persianmirror.com /culture/history/sassanid.cfm   (766 words)

  
 Ardashir I of Persia - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
According to historian Arthur Christensen, the Sassanid state as established by Ardashir I was characterized by two general trends which differentiated it from its Parthian predecessor: a strong political centralization and organized state sponsorship of Zoroastrianism.
The Sassanids could trace their heritage to the Temple of Anahita at Staxr, where Ardashir's grandfather had been a dignitary.
Ardashir was an energetic king, responsible for the resurgence of Persia, the strengthening of Zoroastrianism, and the establishment of a dynasty that would endure for four centuries.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Ardashir_I_of_Persia   (1354 words)

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