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Topic: Saul Kripke


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Saul Kripke
Saul Aaron Kripke (born in November 13, 1940 in Bay Shore, New York) is an American philosopher and logician now emeritus from Princeton and teaches as distinguished professor of philosophy at CUNY Graduate Center.
Saul Kripke is the eldest of three children born to Dorothy and Rabbi Myer Kripke.
Kripke's three lectures constitute an attack on the descriptivist (Fregean, Russellian) theory of reference with respect to proper names, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of the name's being associated with a description that the object in turn satisfies.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Saul-Kripke   (7948 words)

  
 Philosopher, 65, Lectures Not About 'What Am I?' but 'What Is I?' - New York Times
Saul Kripke turned 65 in November, just a moment ago, existentially speaking, so earlier this week the philosophy program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York convened a two-day conference celebrating his birthday and work.
Kripke, who in 2001 was awarded the Schock Prize, philosophy's equivalent of the Nobel, is thought to be the world's greatest living philosopher, perhaps the greatest since Wittgenstein.
Kripke, a rabbi's son, grew up in Omaha, and by all accounts was a true prodigy, so brilliant and precocious that the so-called prodigies of today are by comparison mere shadows flickering on the wall of our collective cave.
www.nytimes.com /2006/01/28/books/28krip.html?ex=1296104400&en=9b8c06355a8dc486&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss   (730 words)

  
 Saul Kripke, Genius Logician
Saul Kripke is one of the greatest thinkers in modern philosophy.
Kripke is a peculiar man with a sharp intellect.
Kripke is one of America's most respected philosophers, still he is not significant in public debates.
www.goinside.com /01/2/kripke.html   (1206 words)

  
  Saul Kripke - Wikinfo
Saul Kripke (born 1940) is an American philosopher now emeritus from (Princeton) and professor of philosophy at CUNY Graduate Center.
Kripke proposed instead a causal theory of reference, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of a causal connection with the object as mediated through communities of speakers.
Kripke argued that the only way to defend this identity is as an a posteriori necessary identity, but that such an identity—e.g., pain is C-fibers firing—could not be necessary, given the possibility of real honest-to-goodness pain that has nothing to do with C-fibers firing.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Saul_Kripke   (1393 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Saul Kripke
Saul Kripke is the eldest of three children born to Dorothy and Rabbi Myer Kripke.
Kripke's three lectures constitute an attack on the descriptivist (Fregean, Russellian) theory of reference with respect to proper names, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of the name's being associated with a description that the object in turn satisfies.
Kripke showed how to do this recursively by starting from the set of expressions in a language which do not contain the truth predicate, defining a truth predicate over just that segment: this adds new sentences to the language, and truth is in turn defined for all of them.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Saul_Kripke   (1636 words)

  
 Saul Kripke   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Kripke is best known for three contributions to philosophy: semantics for modal (and related) logics, published in severalessays beginning while he was in his teens; his 1972 Princeton lectures Naming and Necessity, which significantlyrestructured philosophy of language and, as some haveput it, "made metaphysics respectable again"; and for a controversial and influential interpretation of Wittgenstein.
Kripke's three lectures constitute an attack on the descriptivist (Fregean, Russellian) theory of reference withrespect to proper names, according to which a name refers to an object byvirtue of the name's being associated with a description that the object in turn satisfies.
Kripke proposed instead a causal theory of reference, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of a causalconnection with the object as mediated through communities of speakers.
www.therfcc.org /saul-kripke-3437.html   (711 words)

  
 Saul Kripke
Kripke also raised the prospect of a posteriori necessities—facts that are necessarily true, though they can be known only through empirical investigation.
Kripke argued that the only way to defend this identity is as an a posteriori necessary identity, but that such an identity—e.g., pain is C-fibers firing—could not be necessary, given the possibility of real honest-to-goodness pain that has nothing to do with C-fibers firing.
Kripke also made interesting contributions to the study of the later Wittgenstein in lectures published as Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language, although his work here has been faulted for being not particularly true to the historical Wittgenstein.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/s/sa/saul_kripke.html   (419 words)

  
 " + title + "
Saul Kripke turned 65 in November, just a moment ago, existentially speaking, so earlier this week the philosophy program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York convened a two-day conference celebrating his birthday and work.
Kripke, who in 2001 was awarded the Schock Prize, philosophy's equivalent of the Nobel, is thought to be the world's greatest living philosopher, perhaps the greatest since Wittgenstein.
Kripke, a rabbi's son, grew up in Omaha, and by all accounts was a true prodigy, so brilliant and precocious that the so-called prodigies of today are by comparison mere shadows flickering on the wall of our collective cave.
www.cle.unicamp.br /seme_2005/kripke/NYT.HTM   (970 words)

  
 Saul Kripke at AllExperts
Saul Kripke is the oldest of three children born to Dorothy and Rabbi Myer Kripke.
Kripke married (and recently divorced) Margaret Gilbert whose brother Martin Gilbert is a well-known British historian.
As an alternative, Kripke adumbrated a causal theory of reference, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of a causal connection with the object as mediated through communities of speakers.
en.allexperts.com /e/s/sa/saul_kripke.htm   (1645 words)

  
 Kripke, Saul (1940–) | Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Saul Kripke is an American logician and philosopher born in New York in 1940.
Saul Kripke has worked in many branches of logic (higher recursion theory, set theory, models of arithmetic, and relevance logic), but the work best known to philosophers, and much cited in the literature of linguistic semantics, computer science, and other disciplines, is his development of Kripke models for modal and related logics.
Kripke was the first to publish proofs of completeness theorems to the effect that truth at all x in all models with R reflexive (and transitive) (and symmetric) coincides with provability in the modal logic T (respectively S4) (respectively S5), and he obtained similar results for other modal logics.
www.bookrags.com /research/kripke-saul-1940-eoph   (352 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Naming and Necessity: Books: Saul A. Kripke   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Kripke's quandry gets multiplied when he claims that even if in a possible world some of the descriptions didn't fit the object in question it would still be what it is (i.e.
CUNY's Saul Kripke is the premier logical mind of our time, and this book (rightly acclaimed as a classic of analytic philosophy) is a friendly introduction to considering the topic he made *intellectually* tractable: the role of modalities in thought.
Kripke's three lectures at Princeton have the clarity similar to actually being in one of his classes and the comedy is as...
www.amazon.ca /Naming-Necessity-Saul-Kripke/dp/0674598458   (2267 words)

  
 Saul Kripke « David W. Boles’ Urban Semiotic ™
Saul Kripke is a good Omaha boy who made fine use of his gifts for the world beyond the midlands.
Kripke may be prickly, but that’s the price we pay to touch the effervescence of things we do not comprehend.
Kripke fascinates me because he’s (one of the very few who’s) shown that you REALLY can get ontology from semantics: you (really) can get clear about what, in general, there is, from what is said.
urbansemiotic.com /2005/05/30/saul-kripke   (1075 words)

  
 Saul Kripke   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Kripke semantics for modal and related logics, published in several essays beginning while he was still in his teens.
Kripke's three lectures constitute an attack on the descriptivist (Fregean, Russellian) theory of reference with respect to proper names, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of the name's being associated with a description that the object in turn satisfies.
Kripke argued that the only way to defend this identity is as an a posteriori necessary identity, but that such an identity—e.g., pain is C-fibers firing—could not be necessary, given the possibility of pain that has nothing to do with C-fibers firing.
saul-kripke.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Saul_Kripke   (1866 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
According to Kripke, the main application of the description theory is to the case of baptism: generally the object on which a name is to be bestowed is picked out by description or ostension, which latter may be subsumable under the former.
Kripke sums up his views about true identities involving names in (Kripke 1971) as a trio of assertions: (a) Quine was right that such identities are a posteriori; (b) Marcus was right that such identities are necessary; (c) both were wrong in confusing necessity with epistemological notions.
Kripke maintains, however, that given she is the daughter of George Windsor, it is not counterfactually possible that Elizabeth Windsor is the daughter of anyone else.
www.princeton.edu /~jburgess/Kripke2.doc   (7348 words)

  
 Saul Kripke Summary
Many philosophers consider Saul Kripke to be among the most important contributors to the subject in the twentieth century.
Kripke, Saul(1940–) Saul Kripke is an American logician and philosopher born in New York in 1940.
Saul Aaron Kripke (born in November, 1940, Omaha, Nebraska) is an American philosopher and logician now emeritus from Princeton...
www.bookrags.com /Saul_Kripke   (222 words)

  
 Book review of Saul Kripke
In Kripke's semantics a property is necessary if it is true in all worlds, a property is possible if there is at least a world in which it is true.
Kripke (unlike Frege) carefully distinguishes the meaning of a designator and the way its reference is determined (which are both "sense" in Frege).
Kripke rejects the view that either proper or common nouns are associated with properties that serve to select their referents.
www.thymos.com /mind/kripke.html   (448 words)

  
 Amazon.de: Naming and Necessity: English Books: Saul A. Kripke   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Kripke's much celebrated work should be read by everyone who has a serious interest in philosophy of language.
Kripke does an incredible job of clearing up a mass of confusions that have surrounded the notion of necessity ever since the days of Hume and Kant.
Follow Kripke as he drives home the point that the philosophy of language is dead (not that it hasn't been important).
www.amazon.de /Naming-Necessity-Saul-Kripke/dp/0674598466   (1058 words)

  
 Saul Kripke
Kripke also raised the prospect of a posteriori necessities - facts that are necessarily true, though they can be known only through empirical investigation.
Kripke's book has also been faulted for not giving credit to other authors who interpreted Wittgenstein similarly (see e.g.
Kripke also published substantial novel work in formal logic - particularly in the semantics of modal logic - while in his teens.
www.philosophyprofessor.com /philosophers/saul-kripke.php   (361 words)

  
 Saul Kripke - Definition, explanation
Kripke married Margaret Gilbert whose brother Martin Gilbert is a well-known British historian.
Kripke's three lectures constitute an attack on the descriptivist (Fregean, Russellian) theory of reference with respect to proper names, according to which a name refers to an object by virtue of the name's being associated with a description that the object in turn satisfies.
In his 1975 article "Outline of a Theory of Truth", Kripke showed that a language can consistently contain its own truth predicate, which was deemed impossible by Alfred Tarski, a pioneer in the area of formal theories of truth.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/s/sa/saul_kripke.php   (1247 words)

  
 Harvard University Press: Naming and Necessity by Saul A. Kripke
But Kripke showed how to do it, and now philosophers are busily rewriting all of semantics (and a good deal of epistemology) in Kripkean terms.
Kripke's lectures constitute something of a landmark in the recent development of philosophy...
Saul Kripke, McCosh Professor of Philosophy,Princeton, is a philosopher of international reputation.
www.hup.harvard.edu /catalog/KRINAM.html?show=reviews   (268 words)

  
 Info on Saul Kripke
Saul Kripke was (see below) McCosh Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University.
The description of Kripke that I find most apt is that he is the Bobby Fischer of philosophy.
UPDATE: Kripke transferred to emeritus status for the 1997-98 school year.
krypton.mnsu.edu /~witt/kauthor.html   (201 words)

  
 Kripke Saul - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Kripke Saul - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Kripke, Saul (1940-), leading American philosopher whose work on modal or “possible-worldslogic has exerted great influence during the past two...
In the 1970s, Saul Kripke and Hilary Putnam were instrumental in the genesis of the theory of direct reference.
au.encarta.msn.com /Kripke_Saul.html   (77 words)

  
 Saul Kripke, “The Identity Thesis” (pp
Kripke claims that this flies in the face of our modal intuitions (our intuitions about what is necessarily the case or could possibly be the case).
Kripke accounts for these intuitions be appealing to the machinery of "possible worlds." [As an aside, Kripke first rose to philosophical prominence by showing how such machinery could be employed to systematize the semantics (or "logic") of modal statements.]
According to Kripke, names "rigidly" refer to their referents; they refer to this referent in every possible world that that individual exists.
www.unlv.edu /faculty/beisecker/Courses/Phi-405/KripkeNotes.html   (969 words)

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