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Topic: Sawfly


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  Southeast Alaska Forest Health; Hemlock Sawfly
Hemlock sawfly is a small wasp that feeds on the foliage of western hemlock throughout Southeast Alaska.
Sawflies are more numerous and outbreaks tend to be of longer duration south of Frederick Sound, especially along Clarence Strait, the most southern and warmest area in Southeast Alaska.
Depletion of host foliage is likewise known to impact sawfly populations resulting in starvation and poor nutrition of actively feeding larvae.
www.fs.fed.us /r10/spf/fhp/sefhp/sesawfly.htm   (382 words)

  
 Mountain Ash Sawfly
The mountain ash sawfly, Pristiphora geniculata (Hartig) is a common defoliator of mountain ash in the northeastern United States and Canada.
The egg laying device of the female sawfly is saw-like in shape; thus the common name for this insect group.
The young larvae of the mountain ash sawfly are greenish white with head and legs fl in color.
www.maine.gov /doc/mfs/mtnash.htm   (533 words)

  
  HortResearch Publication - A Guide to Willow Sawfly in New Zealand
As noted above, the sawfly was first discovered in February 1997 following heavy defoliation of tree willows, and was widely distributed in the Auckland isthmus.
By late summer/autumn 1997 the sawfly had been found in Rotorua, and possibly Tauranga and Gisborne (these last sightings were not positively identified).
Adult sawflies lay their eggs in willow leaves; emerging larvae feed on the leaves and then form cocoons either on the tree or in the soil under the tree.
www.hortnet.co.nz /publications/guides/willow_sawfly/wsawfly.htm   (1318 words)

  
  AllRefer.com - sawfly (Zoology: Invertebrates) - Encyclopedia
Sawflies are named for the two sawtoothed blades of the female's ovipositor that are used for slitting leaves or stems in order to deposit the eggs.
Both the sawfly and the closely related horntail, whose burrowing larvae are the hosts of the ichneumon fly, lack the characteristic constricted abdomen of other hymenopterans.
Sawfly larvae resemble caterpillars; some are leaf and stem borers, many feed on the surface of foliage, and others produce galls.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/S/sawfly.html   (249 words)

  
 Sawfly: pictures, information, classification and more
Female sawflies have ovipositors, or egg-laying organs, that are partially modified into sharp-toothed, sawlike instruments with which the insect incises leaves and plant stems to form a receptacle for eggs.
The largest of the common sawflies is about 2.5 cm (about 1 in) and has a wingspread of about 5 cm (about 2 in); the larvae of this species feed on the leaves of many trees, especially of willow.
The rose slug is classified as Cladius isomerus, the currant sawfly as Nematus ribesii, and the larch sawfly as Pristiphora erichsonii.
www.everythingabout.net /articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/sawfly/index.shtml   (297 words)

  
  sawfly - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Sawfly, common name applied to four-winged insects, widely distributed in temperate countries.
Raspberry, common name for certain plants of the rose family, and for their ripe, cap-shaped fruits, which separate from the floral stalk or...
Horntails, also called wood wasps, differ from sawflies chiefly in having a strong,...
ca.encarta.msn.com /sawfly.html   (100 words)

  
 Wheat Stem Insect Pests and Management Practices
Three insects, the wheat stem sawfly, wheat stem maggot, and the Hessian fly, are important pests of wheat in North Dakota.
The wheat stem sawfly is native to the hollow stemmed grasses of western North America.
Sawfly damage has been most severe in fields which are continuously cropped to hard red spring wheat and where stubble is left undisturbed.
www.ag.ndsu.edu /pubs/plantsci/smgrains/e680w.htm   (2971 words)

  
 Factsheet about gooseberry sawfly
It is the caterpillars of the sawfly that do the damage, feeding on the leaves of gooseberry, white and red currants.
Sawfly larvae are green with fl spots and a shiny fl head.
The sawfly overwinter as cocoons in the soil.
www.gardenorganic.org.uk /factsheets/pc3.php   (596 words)

  
 Pine Sawflies
Sawfly larvae resemble caterpillars, yet have at least six pairs of "stublike" prolegs behind the three pairs of true legs on the insect's abdomen (caterpillars never have more than five pairs of prolegs).
Redheaded pine sawfly: Adult females are 6 to 9.5 mm (1/4 to 3/8 inch) in length while males are 5 to 6.5 mm (1/5 to 1/4 inch) long.
The redheaded pine sawfly overwinters in the prepupal stage in its cocoon spun in the litter of the soil beneath the infested trees.
www.uri.edu /ce/factsheets/sheets/pinesawfly.html   (1179 words)

  
 Sheep Chomp and Stomp Sawfly
Hatfield and Blodgett plan to continue their studies to determine the mechanism of sawfly control, whether there is a yield improvement in the crop after sheep have fed on the previous crop's stubble, how sheep grazing affects fall and early spring-sprouting weeds like cheat grass, and how sheep dung contributes to soil nutrients.
In late spring, a female sawfly deposits eggs inside a wheat stem.
Notching weakens the stalk, increasing the likelihood of lodging.
www.montana.edu /wwwpb/ag/bugsheep.html   (698 words)

  
 Hort Answers - European Pine Sawfly
The European pine sawfly is found in large numbers and it often attacks the Mugo pine as well as many other pines in the home landscape.
Sawflies are non-stinging wasps that have their ovipositor serrated like a saw.
The sawfly larvae feed on the foliage in the spring.
www.urbanext.uiuc.edu /hortanswers/detailProblem.cfm?PathogenID=79   (551 words)

  
 pine sawflies - Neodiprion spp.
Trees of all ages are susceptible to sawfly defoliation (Barnard and Dixon 1983, Coppel and Benjamin 1965).
Mature sawfly larvae spin cocoons in the duff or pine litter, mineral soil, or under bark scales.
All southern pines, Pinus spp., are susceptible to sawfly infestation.
creatures.ifas.ufl.edu /trees/sawfly/pine_sawflies.htm   (901 words)

  
 sawfly - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Sawfly, common name applied to four-winged insects, widely distributed in temperate countries.
Raspberry, common name for certain plants of the rose family, and for their ripe, cap-shaped fruits, which separate from the floral stalk or...
Horntails, also called wood wasps, differ from sawflies chiefly in having a strong,...
encarta.msn.com /sawfly.html   (116 words)

  
 Redheaded Pine Sawfly
Sawfly larvae resemble caterpillars, yet have at least six pair of "stublike" prolegs behind the three pair of true legs on the insect's abdomen.
The redheaded pine sawfly overwinters in the prepupal stage in its cocoon spun in the litter of the soil beneath the infested trees.
Benjamin, D.M. The biology and ecology of the redheaded pine sawfly.
www.ext.vt.edu /departments/entomology/factsheets/redpisaw.html   (651 words)

  
 Sawflies of Trees and Shrubs   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sawflies are a group of insects related to wasps and bees.
If sawflies are full grown, treatment is not necessary since they are finishing or have finished feeding; most damage to the plant has already taken place by this time.
Finally, because sawflies often feed in groups, chemical applications should be directed only to the areas they are feeding on; entire tree sprays are unnecessary unless populations are wide-spread throughout the plant.
www.extension.umn.edu /distribution/horticulture/DG6703.html   (2387 words)

  
 The Larch Sawfly
Outbreaks of the larch sawfly became apparent in Alaska in 1993 when 12,000 acres of tamarack (eastern larch) defoliation was observed in interior Alaska.
In 1999, the larch sawfly was recorded from the Mat-Su valley and the Anchorage Bowl feeding on ornamental Siberian larch.
The purpose of this brochure is to describe the life history and life stages of the larch sawfly and to present the homeowner with some guidelines for minimizing damage to ornamental and native larch.
www.fs.fed.us /r10/spf/fhp/leaflets/Larsaw.htm   (1163 words)

  
 Sawfly
Some sawfly larvae are slug-like, appearing slimy, non-segmented and translucent, greenish to fl, while others appear wax-covered in some of their developmental stages.
Larvae of the flheaded ash sawfly, Tethida cordigera (Beauvois), and brownheaded ash sawfly, Tomostethus multicinctus (Rohwer), feed on red and white ash.
They are called sawflies because females of most species have a saw-like structure on the tip of their abdomens used to inject eggs into plant tissue.
insects.tamu.edu /fieldguide/cimg325.html   (451 words)

  
 Army Technology - Revision Eyewear - Ballistic Eyewear for Military and Security Applications
The Sawfly military eyewear system is the best ballistic spectacle available on the market; tough enough to withstand a shotgun blast from 16ft.
Sawfly is tough enough to withstand a shotgun blast from 16ft (five meters) away - see the evidence in the picture on the right!
Sawfly military eyewear — proven to be the top performing impact eyewear available.
www.army-technology.com /contractors/personal/revision   (763 words)

  
 University of Delaware Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Grass sawfly and true armyworm management in small grains
Sawfly larvae prefer to feed on the stems and are potentially more damaging than armyworms.
Although sawflies tend to be found earlier than armyworms, they are often found together.
Since sawflies feed during the day and can be found on the plants, sample plants by shaking the wheat stalks of two rows toward the innerspace between the rows.
www.udel.edu /IPM/facts/gsandtawfactsheet.htm   (704 words)

  
 Royal Horticultural Society - Gardening Advice: Gooseberry Sawfly
Other sawfly species and moth larvae may also occur on these plants.
The common gooseberry sawfly is the most troublesome pest of gooseberries.
Female sawflies lay eggs on the underside of leaves low down in the centre of the bush, so the young larvae go unnoticed until they have eaten their way upwards and outwards, devouring the leaves as they go.
www.rhs.org.uk /advice/profiles0601/gooseberry_sawfly.asp   (219 words)

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