Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Saxony


Related Topics

  
  CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Saxony
Saxony forever the possibility of extending its territory along the lower course of the Elbe, and confirmed the preponderance of Prussia.
Saxony is the fifth state of the German Empire in area and third in population; in 1905 the average population per square mile was 778.8.
The Vicariate Apostolic of Saxony, and the Prefecture Apostolic of Saxon Upper Lusatia.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13497b.htm   (7232 words)

  
  Saxony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Saxony borders, from the east and clockwise, on Poland, the Czech Republic and the German states of Bavaria, Thuringia, Saxony-Anhalt and Brandenburg.
In 1137 Saxony was passed to the Welfen dynasty, who were descendants (1) of Wulfhild Billung, eldest daughter of the last Billung duke, and (2) of the daughter of Lothar of Supplinburg.
After 1918 Saxony was a state in the Weimar Republic and was the scene of Gustav Stresemann's overthrow of the KPD/SPD led government in 1923, during the Nazi era and under Soviet occupation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Saxony   (1275 words)

  
 Saxony. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The land of the Saxons, Saxony was in Frankish times roughly the area in NW Germany between the Elbe and Ems rivers; it also included part of S Jutland.
The ducal title of Saxony went to Bernard of Anhalt, a younger son of Albert the Bear of Brandenburg and founder of the Ascanian line of Saxon dukes.
Duke Maurice of Saxony, a grandson of Albert and a Protestant, received the electoral title in the 16th cent.; it remained in the Albertine branch until the dissolution (1806) of the Holy Roman Empire.
www.bartleby.com /65/sa/Saxony.html   (1068 words)

  
 Lower Saxony - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lower Saxony borders on (from north and clockwise) the North Sea, the states of Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Brandenburg, Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia, and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.
The northwestern portion of Lower Saxony is a part of Frisia; it is called Ostfriesland (East Frisia) and lies on the coast of the North Sea.
Originally the region was simply called Saxony, but as the center of gravity of the Duchy of Saxony gradually moved up the Elbe, towards the present-day states of Saxony-Anhalt and Saxony, the region was given the name of Lower Saxony, which it bore as an Imperial Circle Estate from the late 15th century on.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lower_Saxony   (708 words)

  
 Saxony - Encyclopedia.com
In its current form, Saxony is a federal state of Germany, with its pre-World War II borders reinstated as of Oct., 1990.
The margraves of Meissen acquired (13th-14th cent.) the larger parts of Thuringia and of Lower Lusatia and the intervening territories, and in 1423 Margrave Frederick the Warlike added Electoral Saxony; he became (1425) Elector Frederick I.
Saxony - showcase model case for the east.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Saxony.html   (2058 words)

  
 The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition: Saxony @ HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The land of the Saxons, Saxony was in Frankish times roughly the area in NW Germany between the Elbe and Ems rivers; it also included part of S Jutland.
The ducal title of Saxony went to Bernard of Anhalt, a younger son of Albert the Bear of Brandenburg and founder of the Ascanian line of Saxon dukes.
Duke Maurice of Saxony, a grandson of Albert and a Protestant, received the electoral title in the 16th cent.; it remained in the Albertine branch until the dissolution (1806) of the Holy Roman Empire.
www.highbeam.com /library/doc0.asp?DOCID=1E1:Saxony&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf   (1073 words)

  
 Saxon people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The dukes of Saxony became kings (Henry I, the Fowler, 919) and later the first Emperors (Henry's son, Otto I, the Great) of Germany during the 10th century, but lost this position in 1024.
The region in southeastern Germany known as the Kingdom of Saxony between 1806 to 1918 and the Free State of Saxony after 1990, was not a traditional homeland of the Saxon peoples.
The label "Saxons" was generally applied to German settlers who migrated during the 13th century to south-eastern Transylvania in present-day Romania, where their descendants numbered a quarter of a million in the early decades of the 20th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Saxons   (1033 words)

  
 Saxony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From the mid-13th century, the duke of Saxony was recognized as an imperial elector (a prince with the right to participate in choosing the Holy Roman Emperor); a dispute over this right between the two branches was settled in favour of the Wittenberg branch in 1356.
Saxony's monarchy was abolished after Germany's defeat in World War I (1918), and Saxony adopted a republican constitution as a free state under the Weimar Republic (1919–33).
Saxony Land was re-created in 1990 in the process of the unification of East with West Germany.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/BritannicaPages/Saxony/Saxony.html   (683 words)

  
 Goethe-Institut D Saxony UK 2005
In 2005 the Free State of Saxony, one of the five states to join the Federal Republic of Germany after the fall of the wall, will present a series of projects in the UK.
Leading institutions from Britain and Saxony will collaborate on a range of projects and events from the realms of culture, science and industry.
D Saxony UK 2005 is a project by the Goethe-Institut in Co-operation with the Free State of Saxony and the Cultural Foundation of Saxony
www.goethe.de /dsaxonyuk   (113 words)

  
 Albert of Saxony (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
He was born at Rickensdorf, in the region of Helmstedt (Lower Saxony) in present-day Germany around 1316.
Albert of Saxony's teachings on logic and metaphysics were extremely influential.
Saxony, Albert of, by Pierre Duhem, in The Catholic Encyclopedia, Bd.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/albert-saxony   (3321 words)

  
 Encyclopedia topic: Saxony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The main axis of Saxony is the Elbe (A river in central Europe that arises in northwestern Czechoslovakia and flows northward through Germany to empty into the North Sea) river, crossing the state from southeast to northwest.
The portions in the east of Saxony are the southern parts of the historical region of Lusatia (additional info and facts about Lusatia) (Lausitz) and are called Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz); the minority of the Sorbs (Acid gritty-textured fruit) live in the region, which is bilingual today.
In 1137 Saxony was passed to the Welfen (additional info and facts about Welfen) dynasty, who were descendants (1) of Wulfhild Billung, eldest daughter of the last Billung duke, and (2) of the daughter of Lothar of Supplinburg.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/sa/saxony.htm   (1398 words)

  
 TIME: Silicon Saxony
Saxony, almost half the size of Switzerland and with 4.6 million inhabitants, was one of Germany's key industrial areas in the early 19th century, when the country's first machine tool industry took root in Chemnitz, southwest of Dresden.
In the first 40 years of this century, Saxony had the highest GDP in Europe, and before the collapse of communism, it produced 50% of East Germany's industrial output.
Saxony is a state which looks forward." The rest of Germany, east and west, would do well to follow the Saxon example.
www.time.com /time/magazine/1998/int/980427/europe.silicon_saxony.on14.html   (1419 words)

  
 Saxony today
Today, Saxony is the tenth largest of the German federal states with an area of just under 20,000 km² –; comparable in size to New Jersey, Kuwait, Slovenia or Wales.
By the beginning of the 21st century, Saxony boasted a GDP of nearly EUR 76 billion, roughly equivalent to EUR 17,400 per head of population.
Saxony is ruled by a State Parliament (Landtag) and directly represented in the German federal two-tier parliamentary system.
www.sab.sachsen.de /servlet/PB/menu/1033848_l2   (270 words)

  
 About Saxony Germany   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From 1871, Saxony was a part of the German regime and developed by 1914 into the most densely populated area of Europe.
Saxony is Bach, Mendelssohn, Schumann and Wagner, Gret Palucca, Ludwig Guttler, Stefanie Hertel and 'Die Prinzen'.
Saxony is a symbol of centuries of craftsmanship and inventive genius.
www.saxonytourism.com /aboutsaxony.htm   (895 words)

  
 Saxony: where life is in rhythm
Saxony's policy is to not disseminate or distribute to third parties not involved in the Saxony projects (the "Outside Third Parties"), whether by sale, license or other means, Personal Information.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, if Saxony believes in good faith that disclosure of Personal Information is required by law or to prevent the commission of a criminal act or harm or injury to third parties, Saxony may disclose the Personal Information.
As Saxony does not own or have control over any other Internet sites which may be linked to our website, you should review the privacy policy of any site which may be linked to our website and which you may view after you cease using the Saxony website.
www.saxony-indiana.com /privacy.php   (631 words)

  
 Saxony and Its History
After Henry the Lion, the powerful Duke of Saxony and Bavaria was defeated in 1176 by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa, the boundaries of the duchy were reduced and redrawn to centre it on the middle Elbe with its capital at Wittenberg.
At its centre a sarcophagus was erected in 1563 for Moritz, the Elector of Saxony.
Oberlausitz is the far eastern portion of Saxony, a hilly and mountainous region between the Elbe, the Bohemian border and the upper Neisse.
www.apex.net.au /~jgk/saxony/history.html   (11891 words)

  
 The History of Saxony Keep
Saxony Tower is said to have differed in appearance from the original only by the virtue of a great crystal which was set upon the uppermost parapet, whose light provided a guide to safe harbor for incoming vessels.
While it is true that no Saxony in that time was able to stand as close to the throne as one of the Five, the Saxony family had certainly redeemed its name in the eyes of the crown after the tragedy of YE 139.
Lady Pamilla Saxony was the wealthy widow of major Preston Garvey of the 4th Crown Guard and reputed to be one of the greatest beauties in all Evendarr.
www.marentha.com /saxony.html   (11193 words)

  
 Kingdom of Saxony   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A significant part of inhabitants of Saxony have always been the Slavonic Lusatians (or Wends) whose language is akin to Polish and Czech.
The eastern regions of Saxony are shown on the map of Silesia (at the left).
The territory of Saxony after 1815 is marked in green and the areas then lost to Brandenburg are marked in brown.
www.polishroots.org /genpoland/sax.htm   (209 words)

  
 Saxony Carpet - Flooring Directory & Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Saxony carpet, an underfoot favorite, is noted for its elegance and array of solid hues.
Many dealers call their smoother finished Saxony carpet "plushes." New generation Saxony carpet resist stains and are less susceptible to traffic wear.
Saxony carpet solid color styles have a rich appearance that is ideal for traditional or formal rooms.
www.floorbiz.com /carpet/carpet-buying-guide/carpet-construction/saxony-carpet.htm   (144 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Saxony-Anhalt
With an area of 20,447 km²; and a population of 2.6 million, Saxony-Anhalt (also spelled Saxony Anhalt; German: Sachsen-Anhalt) is one sixteen German Bundesländer (federal states.) The capital is Magdeburg.
Lying to the north-east of central Germany, it is eighth largest in area and (since 1996) tenth in population among the country's sixteen Bundesländer.
It borders on the states of Lower Saxony to the north-west, Brandenburg to the east, Saxony to the south-east and Thuringia to the south-west.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Saxony-Anhalt   (265 words)

  
 saxony
Son of Frederick II the Gentle, Elector of Saxony; on death of father (1464) succeeded to rule jointly with elder brother Ernest; on division of duchy (1485) received eastern and western portions; governor of Netherlands for Holy Roman emperors (1488-93); governor of Friesland (1498-1500).
Augustus II (1670-1733) `the Strong´ Elector of Saxony (1694-1733) and King of Poland (1697-1733).
Saxe was an illegitimate son of Frederick Augustus I, elector of Saxony (1694-1733) and, as Augustus II, king of Poland (1697-1733).
website.lineone.net /~johnbidmead/saxony.htm   (1914 words)

  
 Sorb People (Brandenburg and Saxony, Germany)
The Saxons came from [Lower] Saxony too — roughly the same area as is now Saxony-Anhalt and Lower Saxony in Germany, if I understand it correctly — present day Saxony on the other hand, was not Saxon land in those days.
The sequence of the colors and their official use are established in the constitutions of Saxony and Brandenburg, whereby the use of the flag is officially allowed.
After the collapse of the GDR the use of the Sorb flag is regulated by the constitutions of Brandenburg and Saxony.
www.fotw.net /flags/de_sorbs.html   (1395 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.