Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Schools of Buddhism


Related Topics

In the News (Mon 22 Apr 19)

  
  Buddhist Studies: Schools of Buddhism
The two major schools of Buddhism, Theravada and the Mahayana, are to be understood as different expressions of the same teaching of the historical Buddha.
This school admits the human characteristics of the Buddha, and is characterised by a psychological understanding of human nature; and emphasises a meditative approach to the transformation of consciousness.
The ideal of the Mahayana school, therefore, is that of the Bodhisattva, a person who delays his or her own enlightenment in order to compassionately assist all other beings and ultimately attains to the highest Bodhi.
www.buddhanet.net /e-learning/buddhistworld/schools2.htm   (976 words)

  
  Buddhism 101 - Schools of Buddhism and Further Developments - free Suite101 course
Buddhism is not a singular entity, but is composed of several schools.
The purpose of this exercise is not to champion an “orthodox” Buddhism, but to show that all religions are in flux, and that the idea of orthodoxy is never clear cut (and sometimes completely irrelevant).
Both schools insist that their form of Buddhism is a more accurate version of the teachings espoused by the Buddha – however, despite their disagreements, these two schools actually shared monasteries in the beginning of their existence.
www.suite101.com /lesson.cfm/19042/2658   (1006 words)

  
  Nara Buddhism
The six schools of Nara Buddhism, introduced into Japan during the seventh and eighth centuries CE were Hosso (= Mind-Only, Yogacara); Sanron (= Three Treatises, Madhyamika), Kegon (Flower-Garland, Avatamsaka); Ritsu (= Rules of Discipline, Vinaya); Jojitsu (= Establishment of truth, Satyasiddhi); and Kusha (study of the Abhidharma-kosha texts).
For example, the Sanron school was led in Nara by a Korean monk and took as its basic scriptures the same three Madhyamaka texts (Middle Treatise, Hundred Treatise, Twelve-Topic Treatise) as the 'Three Treatises' school in China and Korea of which it formed a part.
Nara Buddhism is symbolised by the rich assortment of classical temple buildings sponsored by the court, and by an exceptional legacy of Buddhist temple painting and sculpture, some of it deriving from the 'silk road' trade route with China.
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/easia/nara.html   (497 words)

  
 ideas ~ metaxu buddhism
Buddhism has many heavens, but they are not to be thought of as final resting places, but as symbols.
The Sakyapa lineage, one of the schools of Tibetan Buddhism.
The Buddhism of the country of Tibet, consisting of Mahayana Buddhism and elements of the old Bön relgion of Tibet, and of Tibetan Culture.
metaxu.to /buddhism/ideas.php   (5581 words)

  
 Chinese Buddhism
Buddhism entered China a few centuries after the passing away of the Buddha, at a time when Confucianism and Taoism were the predominant religions in a country that was as a big as a continent and rivaled India in historical antiquity and cultural pluralism.
These schools deviated from the original rules prescribed by the Buddha for monastic discipline among the brethren and emphasized the need for exploring the lighter side of life in the practice of Buddhism instead of sorrow and suffering.
The Avatamsaka school expounded a cosmic view of the universe containing the two principal aspects of the reality, namely li and shih, an approach which is in some ways resembles the concept of Purusha (spiritual) and Prakriti (physical) of Hinduism, adopted later on by the Tantric schools.
hinduwebsite.com /buddhism/chinese_buddhism.asp   (2985 words)

  
 Buddhism
Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama (Sanskrit; in Pāli, Siddhattha Gotama), who lived between approximately 563 and 483 BCE.
Theravada Buddhism: parts of India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar (where it is imposed as the state religion),Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, parts of Vietnam (along the Mekong Delta frontier with Cambodia, the so-called "Khmer Krom" region), and parts of China (in Yunnan, Guangxi, and Sichuan).
Tibetan Buddhism: found in Tibet (and adjacent areas of China), North India, Bhutan, Nepal, southwestern China, Mongolia and, various Constituent republic of Russia that are adjacent to the area, such as: Amur Oblast, Buryatia, Chita Oblast, Tuva Republic, and Khabarovsk Krai.
www.thaiexotictreasures.com /buddhism.html   (5803 words)

  
 Buddhism - Crystalinks
Buddhism is a religion and philosophy that developed from the teachings of the Buddha Gautama (or Gautama), who lived as early as the 6th century BC.
The historical origin of Vajrayana is unclear, except that it coincided with the spread of the mentalistic schools of Buddhism.
Buddhism and its founder must be considered on the basis of this social structure which is confirmed in the oldest texts as well as in the modern Oxford History of India.
www.crystalinks.com /buddhism.html   (2690 words)

  
 Buddhism
Buddhism, known as The Way, is not a religion in the Western meaning, but was the teaching of Siddartha Gautama of the Sakya clan, commonly known as Buddha or the Buddha.
Buddhism might have remained an insignificant Indian sect, live so many of it rivals, until it shattered itself apart, but in the third century BC Emperor Ashoka, distraught over the carnage of his latest war, rejected violence as a means of ruling and turned to Buddhism.
Meanwhile Buddhism became firmly established abroad, Buddhism was to grow vigorously in other soils, in a prolixity of philosophies, forms of mysticism, creative arts, literature, and doctrinal schools, some of which had great purity while others were heavily burdened with folklore, superstition, and magic.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/b/buddhism.html   (1276 words)

  
 Schools of Buddhism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Schools of Buddhism, Schools of Buddhism - Mahāyāna schools, Schools of Buddhism - Nikaya schools, Schools of Buddhism - Tantric schools, Schools of Buddhism - Theravada schools, Buddhism by region, Northern and Southern Buddhism
The different schools in Theravada often emphasize different aspects (or parts) of the Pali Canon and the later commentaries, or differ in the focus on (and recommended way of) practice.
Schools Of Buddhism is one of the topics in focus at Global Oneness.
www.globaloneness.com /a/Schools_of_Buddhism/id/303087   (462 words)

  
 Buddhism
Buddhism, like any other spiritual thought system, is such an extensive subject that we would not pretend to be able to offer complete information on it here.
Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future: it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.
Buddhism became so fragmented that barely one hundred years after the death of Siddhartha, a council of Buddhists was called to straighten out the differences.
www.iloveulove.com /spirituality/buddhist/buddhism.htm   (3638 words)

  
 Buddhism, Root Institute, Bodhgaya India
Thus there is a rich variety to be found within his teachings, ranging from the simple to the profound, and from this many different schools of Buddhism have evolved in various countries.
Buddhism is a spiritual path firmly grounded in reason and the practice of Buddhism can be defined as falling into two categories, that of Method, and that of Wisdom.
This philosophy is held by all schools and sub-schools of Buddhist thought, so that it can be said the underlying view of Buddhism is that of the interdependent nature of phenomena.
www.rootinstitute.com /buddhism/buddhism.html   (582 words)

  
 Buddhism - Shambhala
Buddhism thrived in India until the twelfth century, when it was wiped out in military incursions by subsequent waves of Turko-Afgani invaders.
Tibetan Buddhism is unique in its synthesis of all three approaches or "vehicles" as progressive stages on a comprehensive path of practice and study.
The founder of the Shambhala community, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, was a holder of both Kagyu and Nyingma lineages as the abbot and 11th descendent in the line of Trungpa tulkus (incarnate lama) of Surmang Monastery in eastern Tibet.
www.shambhala.org /buddhism.html   (1411 words)

  
 Three Main Buddhist Schools in Asia - Guide to Japanese Buddhism & Buddhist Sculpture
Although the Japanese court was quick to adopt Mahayana Buddhism, the teachings of the Theravada and the Vajrayana schools did not go unnoticed or unpracticed.
Sects from all three schools are still active in Japan today, but the dominant form is clearly Mahayana.
Buddhism as practiced today is still divided into these three schools -- (1) Theravada, meaning School of the Elders, but pejoratively known as Hinayana or Lesser Vehicle; (2) Mahayana, meaning Greater Vehicle; and (3) Vajrayana, meaning Diamond Vehicle; also known as Tantric or Esoteric Buddhism.
www.onmarkproductions.com /html/schools-three-vehicles.shtml   (305 words)

  
 History of Buddhism in India
The Sarvastivadin school is important in that it formed the basis for the later development of Mahayana.
The main scriptural source for this school is the Sutra Explaining the Thought (Samdhinirmochana-sutra), which consists of a series of questions put to the Buddha by a group of bodhisattvas.
The Yogachara school is commonly referred to in Tibet as "Mind Only" (sems tsam; Sanskrit: chitta-matra) because of an idea found in some Yogachara texts that all the phenomena of the world are "cognition-only" (vijnapti-matra), implying that everything we perceive is conditioned by consciousness.
buddhism.kalachakranet.org /india.html   (1715 words)

  
 VEDA - Vedas and Vedic Knowledge Online - Vedic Encyclopedia, Bhakti-yoga in vedas, Library
Therefore in his Vedanta-sutra (second adhyaya, pada two) he encapsulated a description and a refutation of each of the four main schools of Buddhist philosophy that would flourish in India after the Buddha departed the material world.
That which appears in CAPITALS is a summarization of Srila Baladeva Vidyabhusana's Govinda-bhasya commentary on the sutras dealing with Buddhism.
Actually a living entity is transcendental to material existence, but because of his mentality of lording it over material nature, his material existential condition does not cease, and just as in a dream, he is affected by all sorts of disadvantages.
www.veda.harekrsna.cz /encyclopedia/buddhism.htm   (3776 words)

  
 E-sangha, Buddhist Forum and Buddhism Forum -> Other Schools Of Buddhism?
The origins and development of the 18 early schools are highly complex and problematic: the number 18 is itself somewhat symbolic, and the names of the schools are not the same in all sources.
The Hinayana teachings:[/I] No school of Buddhism called itself by this derisive, divisive name, so it would be fair to say that there were and are no schools of Buddhism that could be correctly called hinayana.
That’s nice for you, but calling another school of Buddhism hinayana, calling it inferior, stating that it is selfish, of inferior insight and compassion is simply not justified.
www.lioncity.net /buddhism/index.php?showtopic=3219   (4572 words)

  
 Buddhism
Buddhism is a religion which does not have a God at its centre and was founded by an Indian prince, Siddartha Guatama, who became the Buddha, in the 6
Buddhism is based upon the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, an Indian prince born in approximately 563 BC.
In Tibet Buddhism became a form of government as well as a religion.The Dalai Lama is the Tibetan Buddhists' spiritual leader and is seen as a reincarnation of the spirit of Buddha.
www.world-faiths.com /Buddhism/BUDDHISM.HTM   (2291 words)

  
 Major Sects in Chinese Buddhism
Bodhidharma is thought to be the first patriarch in the Chinese school and the 28th patriarch of the Indian school.
The school's name is a Chinese rendering of the Sanskrit term dharma-laksana which means "marks of the dharmas." It is based on the writings of Asanga and Vasubandhu and corresponds to the Yogacara school of India.
This school believes that everthing that is experienced is "mind only" (chittamatra); things exist only as processes of knowing, not as objects; outside the knowing process they have no reality.
www.hsuyun.net /majorsects.html   (1055 words)

  
 JAPANESE BUDDHISM
This is a brief introduction to Buddhism in Japan focusing on the main schools in Japan and terms the student is likely to encounter in the course of readings for HUM 310 Japan.
Buddhism was brought to Japan from China at different periods by various individuals whose studies and practice differ widely.
The school venerates the three mysteries: the mandala (go-honzon), daimoku the title of the sutra itself and third the kaidan, a sacred shelf.
cla.calpoly.edu /~bmori/syll/Hum310japan/JBUDDHISM.html   (2034 words)

  
 insideBuddhism.com > Teachings > Mahayana Buddhism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Vajrayana Buddhism, also known as Tantric Buddhism and Esoteric Buddhism, is often viewed as the third major school of Buddhism, alongside the Theravada and Mahayana schools.
From this point of view the esoteric Vajrayana is the only Buddhist teaching which is not a compromise with the limited nature of the audience to which it is directed, since the teachings are said to be the Dharmakaya (the principle of enlightenment) in the form of Mahavairocana, engaging in a monologue with himself.
Tibetan Buddhism is still practiced as a folk religion in Mongolia today despite more than 80 years of state-sponsored communism.
www.insidebuddhism.com /teachings/types/Vajrayana   (1491 words)

  
 Primary Schools of Buddhism
Buddhism has evolved into different forms so that it can be relevant to the different cultures in which it exists.
The Arhat (or Arahant) is the ideal figure of this school, as is the bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism.
This school of Buddhism developed around the middle of the first millennium, out of the teachings of the Mahayana, and reached Tibet, China, and Japan from central Asia and India, along with the Mahayana.
members.tripod.com /~Neurotopia/Zen/schools   (1583 words)

  
 Chinese Buddhism
Chinese Buddhism Buddhism entered China a few centuries after the passing away of the Buddha, at a time when Confucianism and Taoism were the predominant religions in a country that was as a big as a continent and rivaled India in historical antiquity and cultural pluralism.
These schools deviated from the original rules prescribed by the Buddha for monastic discipline among the brethren and emphasized the need for exploring the lighter side of life in the practice of Buddhism instead of sorrow and suffering.
The Avatamsaka school expounded a cosmic view of the universe containing the two principal aspects of the reality, namely li and shih, an approach which is in some ways resembles the concept of Purusha (spiritual) and Prakriti (physical) of Hinduism, adopted later on by the Tantric schools.
www.purifymind.com /ChineseBuddhism.htm   (2929 words)

  
 Buddhism and Science   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Buddhism goes beyond modern science in its acceptance of a wider field of knowledge than is allowed by the scientific mind.
In contrast, Buddhism is inwardly directed and is concerned with the inner development of man. On the lower level, Buddhism teaches the individual how to adjust and cope with events and circumstances of daily life.
Buddhism has a complete system of mental culture concerned with gaining insight into the nature of things which leads to complete self-realisation of the Ultimate Truth - Nirvana.
www.serve.com /cmtan/buddhism/Misc/buddsc1.html   (410 words)

  
 Buddhist Schools
It's not surprising that meditation is a prime characteristic of this school of Buddhism.
Followers of the Gelug school are also sometimes referred to as 'the yellow hats' (in contrast to 'the red hats' of the Nyingma school).
The Dalai Lama heads the Gelug school and is regarded as the embodiment of Chenrezig, The Bodhisattva of Compassion (the equivalent of Avalokitesvara).
www.iloveulove.com /spirituality/buddhist/buddhistschools.htm   (1585 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.