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Topic: Scientific names


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In the News (Fri 31 Oct 14)

  
  ADW: What is in a Scientific Name?
Scientific names are also designed to tell you something about the animal's relationships with other animals.
The scientific name of each species is made up of a generic name (generic epithet) and a specific name (specific epithet).
The specific name, megalotis, means "big ears." Another example is yellow-headed flbirds, whose scientific name is Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus, which literally means "yellow-headed, yellow head." Scientific names also sometimes bear the names of people who were instrumental in discovering or describing the species.
animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu /site/animal_names/scientific_name.html   (800 words)

  
  BiologyBase: Scientific Names
The first of the pair of words in a scientific name is the name of the genus (plural genera) of the animal, and is intended to show a close relationship among those sharing the generic name.
The second of the pair of words in a scientific name is the specific epithet (species name) of the animal.
The generic name or initial is always capitalized, the specific epithet never is. This is the proper form for a scientific name.
www.interaktv.com /articles/scinames.htm   (1103 words)

  
 scientific names
Every serious naturalist is quickly immersed in a sea of scientific names as he or she graduates to more technical resources.
The names are authorized by widely accepted commissions or groups that evaluate the names and research on the relationships between species.
As a matter of form, scientific names are always in italics or underlined (rarely in bold type), and the first letter of the genus name is always capitalized.
www.wavecrestdiscoveries.com /articles/scientific_names.htm   (615 words)

  
 Scientific Plant Names, Oregon State Univ., LANDSCAPE PLANTS
A Latin binomial name (the "scientific name") is italicized or underlined, the genus is capitalized and the specific epithet is usually not capitalized.
from a vernacular name (e.g., Picea Omorika - the Balkan name for spruce), or
In this case, the cultivar name is sometimes considered a "nonsense" name in that it is rarely used in commerce.
oregonstate.edu /dept/ldplants/sci-names.htm   (1775 words)

  
 How animals are given scientific names   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
A subspecies scientific name consists of three components (ie a trinomen), the genus name, the species name and the subspecies name.
Names published before 1930 are more lenient on this point - one of the following ‘indications’ is enough to replace the description: in family group names, the genus name from which the family name is formed (e.g.
Names that have been made invalid as a result of a judgement that is a matter of opinion.
www.museums.org.za /bio/animal_nomenclature.htm   (3011 words)

  
 Successful Learning: Understanding and Learning Scientific Names of Species
Scientific names of species of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals are those which conform to one of the codes of nomenclature——rule books for composing names (e.g.
Scientific names are no longer the monopoly of the biologists; with the 21 st century becoming the century for biotechnology, life sciences or biology, these names are now frequently and regularly finding their way into newspapers, television and radio as well as everyday speech, so it's useful to know some of them.
Scientific names are etymology-based, meaning that both components of the name are Latin and/or Latinised words (which are derived from another language, such as Greek——the source of most non-Latin words).
www.cdtl.nus.edu.sg /success/sl43.htm   (847 words)

  
 Successful Learning: Understanding and Learning Scientific Names of Species
Scientific names of species of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals are those which conform to one of the codes of nomenclature——rule books for composing names (e.g.
Scientific names are no longer the monopoly of the biologists; with the 21 st century becoming the century for biotechnology, life sciences or biology, these names are now frequently and regularly finding their way into newspapers, television and radio as well as everyday speech, so it's useful to know some of them.
Scientific names are etymology-based, meaning that both components of the name are Latin and/or Latinised words (which are derived from another language, such as Greek——the source of most non-Latin words).
www.cdtl.nus.edu /success/sl43.htm   (847 words)

  
 Scientific and common names
The scientific name of a species is governed by internationally accepted rules that determine what the name is and insure that each species has only one.
Each scientific name of a species is two words (a binomen)—the first is the name of the genus to which the species is assigned, the second is the specific name.
Scientific names that were widely used for North American singing insects but have since been discarded because of provisions in the Code are listed in Synonyms.
buzz.ifas.ufl.edu /h00names.htm   (668 words)

  
 Growing with Phipps: Plant names can be scientific or common
The decision-makers for scientific names are made up of an international group of botanists who meet periodically to update the rules and standards that govern the usage of all botanical names.
Scientific names, on the other hand, are Latin-based and are not always the easiest to pronounce and retain.
The correct form for writing the scientific name for a hybrid is using an "x" between each of the parent plant names.
www.post-gazette.com /homes/20010707plantnames0707p7.asp   (832 words)

  
 Scientific Names   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Scientific names are used almost every day, and quite often by ordinary people.
In the scientific world, and also the world of the nursery business, plants are called by a binomial (animals are too), that is, "two names".
I have tried to include the common names in English for all plants listed, but remember that common names are confusing; almost all of the Pitcher Plants are called "Flycatchers", as is the Venus Fly Trap, and sometimes folks call Sundews this also.
webpages.charter.net /snetherton999/naming.html   (344 words)

  
 Scientific Names
Later we'll see that these names have a whole other dimension, but right now it's enough to know that the genus is "bigger" than the species.
The Tufted Titmouse's scientific name is Parus bicolor
The Yellow-shafted Flicker's name was chosen for both because it was published first.
www.backyardnature.net /namelatn.htm   (616 words)

  
 English Version Bourke's Parakeet, Site Navigation
Behind the binomial scientific name of a species (Greek or Latin) the abbreviation of the English name for the mutation factor is placed (in between parenthesis).
Example: The scientific name of the Bourke species is : "Neopsephotus bourkii" The scientific name of the lutino Bourke, one of the colour varieties of the Bourke, is: "Neopsephotus bourkii (M-t+)" The third part of the name looks like a letter code.
The scientific name of the opaline-fallow variety is: Neopsephotus bourkii (M-di, M-a) Because there is a rather restricted number of mutation factors (about 30) ithe whole sysystem is easey to manage.
www.bourkes-parakeet.nl /pg/E-version.html   (1534 words)

  
 Understanding Scientific Names
The scientific name is in Latin, which is the international language of science.
The second part of the scientific name is the specific epithet, an adjective describing members of a genus.
A cultivar name follows the species name and is enclosed within single quotation marks, not underlined or italicized, and each word begins with a capital letters.
www.ces.ncsu.edu /depts/hort/consumer/quickref/general/scientific_names.html   (511 words)

  
 Value of Scientific Names
This name is internationally agreed-upon according to rules laid down and moderated by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN), enabling scientists from every country to exchange information and - regardless of what other linguistic hurdles may be encountered - to be absolutely certain they are all discussing the same species.
Scientific names are never changed capriciously or maliciously; they are provoked by inconsistencies between old and new data and changed (often reluctantly) on the grounds of sound scientific reasoning.
Tom and others frustrated by the apparently perpetual game of 'scientific name catch-up' may take some comfort in the fact that - as criteria for defining species become more rigorous and tools for differentiating species and determining evolutionary relatedness become ever more refined - changes to scientific names will become increasingly rare.
www.elasmo-research.org /education/topics/ng_scientific_names.htm   (1602 words)

  
 Understanding Scientific Names For Fish
Scientific names are used to identify all living organisms.
Scientific names, based mainly on Latin, conform to a defined system, which seeks to group organisms into logical groups, depending on their similarity.
Names ending with "i" (pronounced "ee-eye" on the end, though often only the "eye" part is pronounced), denote that the discoverer was male, and those ending "ae" denote female.
www.thetropicaltank.co.uk /scinames.htm   (607 words)

  
 scientific names, binomial nomenclature, Linnaean taxonomy
Scientific names were first introduced in the sixteenth century by Jean and Gaspard Bauhin, Swiss brothers who were botanists.
One part of the name is shared by a related group of similar kinds of things, the second part of the name applies to individuals.
Scientific names are usually either simple descriptions or honour a person.
www.julianrocks.net /theory/taxonomy.htm   (449 words)

  
 Species Names
All are scientific names, all have the same specific epithet, but all are classified in different genera.
Scientific names, or the generic name, are written so readers can recognize these words as scientific names.
During your studies, you will have occasion to write scientific names (species names), genera names, species names that have been referred to earlier in the manuscript, scientific names, and species names followed by a variety name.
www.uwlax.edu /biology/communication/SpeciesNames.html   (595 words)

  
 uk.rec.birdwatching - Scientific bird names explained
Scientific names are normally written in italics: this isn’t actually a demand of the Code, but is required by most journals.
But regardless of their origin, generic names are required to have the form of a Latin noun, with a defined gender, and the specific names are required to decline according to the rules of Latin adjectives.
Here are translations of the scientific names of some of the European birds, together with my comments on their suitability, memorability or singular lack thereof.
www.xs4all.nl /~sbpoley/scinames.htm   (2839 words)

  
 Scientific and Common Names - Plant Management in Florida Waters
Scientific names are the same name for the same organism no matter where on the planet you are, no matter what language you speak.
Scientific names cannot be changed except by scientific agreement, such as when scientists convene specifically to debate and agree on plant and animal taxonomy.
A scientific name is a name used by botanists, growers, plant managers and other interested citizens to help avoid the confusion caused by the use of common plant names.
plants.ifas.ufl.edu /guide/scicom.html   (924 words)

  
 [Animals: Common and Scientific Names], UM Libraries
A checklist and reference to the standardized common names and recognized scientific names of all genera, species and subspecies of amphibians and reptiles native to the United States and Canada.
Each account gives the scientific name, type of species, type specimen(s) as well as the locality at which the type specimen was collected.
Includes scientific names of important species and genera of arthropods in the fields of agriculture, forestry, horticulture and human and veterinary medicine.Organized alphabetically.
www.lib.umd.edu /MCK/GUIDES/animal_names.html   (2548 words)

  
 [Plants: Common and Scientific Names], UM Libraries
Scientific names are used; cross references are given for common names.
Common names are cross-indexed, with the exception of fruits and vegetables which are listed and described by their common names.
The Plant Names project is a joint project between The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, The Harvard University Herbaria, and the Australian National Herbarium to develop a comprehensive authority file for the names of all seed plants as the International Plant Names Index (IPNI).
www.lib.umd.edu /UMCP/MCK/GUIDES/plant_names.html   (2584 words)

  
 Scientific Names List for Butterfly Species of North America   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The annotated "Scientific Names List for Butterfly Species of North America, North of Mexico" by P.A. Opler and A.D. Warren has just been published (2002) in the Contributions of the Gillette Museum of Arthropod Biodiversity.
This is the first list of scientific names of North American butterfly species prepared and reviewed by systematists since that of C.D. Ferris (1989).
Annotations with literature citations are given for many of the names as explanation for their current usage.
www.texasento.net /scinames.htm   (280 words)

  
 Article - Understanding Scientific Names and Words by Arthur Lee Jacobson
But in cases of misapplied names, to omit the authority names is often irresponsible --their inclusion hurts no one and yet helps many researchers.
Alas, scientific judgement has been, is, and shall be divided, so one expert's species can be another's subspecies; one scholar's concept of "valid publication" may fail to meet the criteria of another.
The approach adopted in selecting names for this volume has been conservative --to defer to consensus where it exists; otherwise, to usually accept the nomenclature preferred by contemporary generic specialists, regardless whether such specialists are termed "lumpers" or "splitters." However, recognition of apomictic microspecies (as in Rubus, Hieracium and Taraxacum), is not adopted.
www.arthurleej.com /a-scientific.html   (1471 words)

  
 ZO 402 Guide to Scientific Names
Scientific names for higher taxonomic levels sometimes vary according to schools of thought.
Scientific names are said to be "anglicized" when the endings are changed to English format.
The author's name is supposed to be attached to the species name in every scientific publication the first time it is used, in the text or a table, but this rule is often ignored in non-taxonomic articles.
www.cals.ncsu.edu /course/zo403/scinames.html   (1107 words)

  
 Scientific Names   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The two names that are right next to the plant or animal's common name are called "scientific names".
The reason these names sound funny is because they are a written language called Latin that nobody speaks anymore.
The first name in a scientific name is kind of like your last name.
www.watersheds.org /nature/scientific.htm   (534 words)

  
 Help With Scientific Names
Learning the scientific name of an organism will help you find more information on that group and attach your media file or treehouse page to the right place on the Tree of Life.
The scientific name of an organism is written in Latin and in some ways reflects the relationship of that species with other Life on Earth.
By using scientific names, a scientist in Ethiopia studying different types of mud turtles can communicate with a scientist in Russia, and both scientists will know exactly what species the other person is talking about.
tolweb.org /tree/learn/TreebuilderTools/BuildingGuide/SciNames.html   (1274 words)

  
 Greek Pronounciation and Spelling of Scientific names
There is a lot of debate about the correct pronunciation and spelling of the scientific names of fishes, due to their origins which are mainly the ancient Greek language and Latin.
Many of these names, after passing from language to language, have either lost their correct spelling (according to the grammar of the language from which they are coming from), or are very difficult for people, except (probably) the Greeks, to be pronounced accurately.
Although the origins of many scientific names (incorrectly called Latin names) are in Greek and/or Latin, the current words are in a language all of their own.
www.malawicichlidhomepage.com /aquainfo/greek_pronounce.html   (3929 words)

  
 Scientific Names - How they Work
Binomial (genus/species) names are followed by the name(s) of the describer(s) and by the year of publication of the scientifc description.
If another name and year appears afterwards in brackets, this means the fish has been previously described with a different name: i.e.
Type population is the variety that holds the name of the geographical place where the type of a species belongs to.
www.malawicichlidhomepage.com /aquainfo/scientific_names.html   (750 words)

  
 Scientific Names of sharks
Carl von Linne’s name was latinized to Carolus Linnaeus.
As an example, the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, both of the scientific names are Greek; an approximate meaning would be: equal tailed with a sharp snout.
Sometimes the changes to scientific names are minor, like changing the spelling of one of the latinized words, such as changing the Genus spelling of the whale shark, from Rhiniodon typus to Rhincodon typus; or changing the species designation spelling of the tiger from Galeocerdo cuvieri, to Galeocerdo cuvier.
www.newenglandsharks.com /Com.-Scient%20names.htm   (2439 words)

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