Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Scottish Lowlands


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Mountains and hills of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault.
The Scottish Lowlands, although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or GÃ idhealtachd), that is, everywhere due south and east of a line (the Highland Boundary Fault) between Stonehaven and...
Scottish Borders (Crìochan na h-Alba in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Mountains-and-hills-of-Scotland   (1445 words)

  
  Scottish Lowlands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Selkirkshire, the Lothians, Berwickshire, Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfriesshire, Peeblesshire, Roxburghshire and Ayrshire.
Orkney and Shetland are sometimes called "lowland", mainly because of their current language, but have a separate identity derived from the Norse to the point of some islanders not considering themselves Scottish.
The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to the Lowland Scots, Scottish history and the Scottish clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Scottish_lowlands   (276 words)

  
 Central Lowlands - Search Results - MSN Encarta
To the south of the Highlands lie the Central Lowlands, a low-lying belt of fertile valleys with an average elevation of 150 m (500 ft).
The Central Lowlands are a broad area of low-lying and heavily populated land in southern Scotland.
The Central Lowlands Province of western Ohio is underlain by limestone and dolomite, with some shale beds, mostly of Silurian age, but with a significant portion of bedrock of Ordovician age in the...
encarta.msn.com /Central_Lowlands.html   (256 words)

  
 the Mail online | Special Promotion - Discover Britain
East Dunbartonshire is perfect for cyclists and walkers, with a number of walkways and hidden natural attractions such as the shaded glens and waterfalls in the Campsie hills.
Venturing towards the Scottish borders, Ayrshire and Arran, situated on the beautiful Clyde Coast, offers a wide range of activities and a captivating landscape of ancient castles, impressive country parks and gardens, pretty villages and market towns.
Further east, the Scottish Borders represent some of the richest and gentlest areas of Scotland's breathtaking landscape, with gentle valleys and rich agricultural plains, to rocky coastline and picturesque villages.
www.dailymail.co.uk /pages/discoverbritain/scottishlow.html   (467 words)

  
 Scotland >> Crafts >> Bagpipes
Scottish bagpipes are of two main kinds: Great, or Highland, pipes (in Gaelic, a Phìob or Piob Mhór) and bellows-blown pipes, of which there are several varieties.
In the Scottish Lowlands, a number of different bagpipes were played, smaller and quieter than the Highland pipes and powered by bellows pumped by the player's elbow.
In centuries past, many Scottish border towns employed a town piper to play in the streets early in the morning and sound the curfew at night.
www.folklife.si.edu /resources/Festival2003/scot_bagpipes.htm   (509 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Scottish Lowlands
The Scottish Lowlands, although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands, that is, everywhere due south and east of a line roughly drawn between the Stonehaven, Kincardineshire and the Firth of Clyde.
It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Peeblesshire, the Lothians, Berwickshire, Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfriesshire, Selkirkshire, and Roxburghshire.
Traditional Scottish counties which include both Highland and Lowland sections include Perthshire, Aberdeenshire, Banffshire, Morayshire, Kincardineshire, and Ayrshire (the isle of Arran).
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Scottish_Lowlands   (211 words)

  
 Scottish Origins, Ch. 4 - Scotland Under MacBeth Successors
Scottish ties (Lowland)to England would grow deeper and deeper with every passing generation of Lowland Scot's, and it was from the Lowlands, that the Scots Kings would rule.
This is the beginning of the separation of Lowland Scotland from the Highlands and the Isles of Scotland.
The Lowlands, already a mix of Scots, Strathclyde Britons, Angles, and Saxons, went on to be known as Scots.
members.aol.com /skyewrites/origins4.html   (1699 words)

  
 Scottish Background
Not only were they opposed to Scottish devolution, they also acquired a reputation for favouring English interests and ignoring Scotland, with the result that the Tories rapidly lost support in Scotland, until in the British General Election of 1997 not one Conservative was elected as an MP for a Scottish constituency.
Early claims that Scottish politics would be new and different, avoiding party squabbling, have not always been fulfilled, and the parliament is dogged by the scandal of the huge cost of its new building in Edinburgh, not likely to be ready to use for many years yet.
The Scottish Parliament faces its second general election in 2002, when it will be interesting to see how the Scots vote, and in what numbers, having watched their politicians in operation.
www.st-andrews.ac.uk /~www_se/personal/cjmm/Scotback.html   (3429 words)

  
 Scottish Independence Guide: History: A short guide to Scottish History
Her influence in Church politics, pressed the Scottish Church to move away from some of its unique Celtic traditions towards greater conformity with the rites of the Church in the rest of Western Europe.
Despite the English fears of a Scottish invasion at the union, Scotland appeared, to the new King, to be less the coloniser than the colonised.
His romantic portrayals of Scottish life in centuries past still continue to have a disproportionate effect on the public perception of "authentic Scottish culture," and the pageantry he organised for the Visit of King George IV to Scotland made tartan and kilts into national symbols.
www.scottishindependence.com /history.htm   (8777 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Orkney and Shetland are sometimes called 'lowland', mainly because of their current language, but have a separate identity derived from the Norse to the point of some islanders not considering themselves Scottish.
Many descendants of the Scots-Irish, as they are known in the United States, or Ulster-Scots, originated from the lowlands and borders region before having migrated to the Ulster Plantation in the 17th century and later the American frontier, many prior to the American Revoultion.
The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to the Lowland Scots, Scottish history and the Scottish clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Scottish_lowlands   (315 words)

  
 Lowlands - History - Scottish - tongue - Discover UK - About the UK - British Council - china   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
Their settlement was supported by the Scottish king and followed by additional settlement from the South.
Gradually, their language spread through the whole lowland area, with Gaelic remaining beyond the Highland line.
The resemblance of the two tongues was yet not forgotten, although the northern one eventually began to be called "Scottish".
www.britishcouncil.org /china-aboutuk-scotland-history-scottish-tongue-lowlands.htm   (304 words)

  
 [No title]
The farmers of Fife and the Lowlands, the artisans of the towns, the dwellers in the coast districts north of Tay, became, by the end of the thirteenth century, stout Northumbrian Englishmen.
The Scottish nobility began to find its true place at the English Court; the Scottish adventurer was irresistibly drawn to London; the Scottish Presbyterian found the English Puritan his brother in the Lord; and the Scottish Episcopalian joined forces with the English Cavalier.
Scottish historians have not failed to point out that the value of the homage, for whatever it was given, is sufficiently indicated by Malcolm's dealings with Gospatric of Northumberland, whom William dismissed as a traitor and rebel.
www2.cddc.vt.edu /gutenberg/1/6/6/4/16647/16647-8.txt   (20040 words)

  
 Scottish Lowlands - Definition, explanation
The Scottish Lowlands, although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands, that is, everywhere due south and east of a line roughly drawn between the Stonehaven, Kincardineshire and the Firth of Clyde.
It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Peeblesshire, the Lothians, Berwickshire, Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfriesshire, Selkirkshire, and Roxburghshire.
The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to Scottish history and the Scottish clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/s/sc/scottish_lowlands.php   (340 words)

  
 The Project Gutenberg eBook of Outline of the Relations between England and Scotland (500-1707), by ROBERT S. RAIT
That the Scottish Lowlanders (among whom we include the inhabitants of the coast districts from the Tay to the Moray Firth) were, in the end of the thirteenth century, "English in speech and manners" (as Mr.
In 1249, the Scottish king died, and his son and successor,[40] Alexander III, was knighted by Henry of England, and, in 1251, married Margaret, Henry's eldest daughter.
It promised the restoration of all the symbols of Scottish independence which Edward I had removed, and it arranged a marriage between Prince David, the heir to the Scottish throne, and Joanna, the sister of the young king of England.
www2.cddc.vt.edu /gutenberg/1/6/6/4/16647/16647-h/16647-h.htm   (18250 words)

  
 Scottish
Scottish and Scots used was originally used for the dwellers of Ireland.
In the eighth century Scottish and Scots included the inhabitants of Northern Britain, who were of Irish descent and lived along the west coast of Alban, beyond the Firth of Clyde (south-west of Glasgow).
The borders between Scotland and England were continually shifting and the Scottish population was a mix of Scots, Picts (inhabitants of the east side as far south as the Firth of Forth, just north of Edinburgh), Strathclyde Britons, Norsemen (Norwegians) and Anglo-Saxons.
www.eng.umu.se /city/Fredrik/city/scottish.htm   (2248 words)

  
 Bambooweb: Scottish Lowlands
The Scottish Lowlands, although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands, that is, everywhere due south and east of a line roughly drawn between the Moray Firth and the Clyde estuary.
It therefore includes the traditional Scottish counties of Ayrshire, Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Peeblesshire, the Lothians, Berwickshire, Wigtownshire, Kirkcudbrightshire, Dumfriesshire, Selkirkshire, Roxburghshire and Kincardineshire.
The term Scottish Lowlands is generally used mostly with reference to Scottish history and the clan system, as well as in family history and genealogy.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/S/c/Scottish_Lowlands.html   (167 words)

  
 Reconstructing History — Scottish Historical Clothing Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
The Scottish Highlands were considered a backwater of Europe, and not worth much attention, and consequently there are few descriptions or drawings of what people wore.
"They [the Scottish soliders] were recognized among the Irish Soldiers by the distinction of their arms and clothing, their habits and language, for their exterior dress was mottled cloaks of many colours (breacbhrait ioldathacha) with a fringe to their shins and calves, their belts over their loins outside their cloaks.
Clan tartans are a relatively recent innovation, due to renewed interest in Scottish heritage in the early 1800s, when the laws against the wearing of kilts and tartans were lifted.
www.reconstructinghistory.com /scottish/medievalscot.html   (2143 words)

  
 Haunted Scotland. Haunted Edinburgh. Scottish Ghosts. Scotland. Edinburgh.
So it was that the Scottish nobles turned to Edward 1st of England and asked him to mediate in the contest.
When the great seal of Scotland, that most precious emblem of Scottish Sovereignty, was presented to Edward, he cast it contemptuously aside observing facetiously “a man does good business when he rids himself of a turd”.
When the Scottish Bishop’s gave their blessing to the rebellion it became both a national and moral crusade.
www.haunted-britain.com /Haunted_Scotland_Lowlands.htm   (3825 words)

  
 Children of the Mist: The Story of the Scottish Highlanders!
The Lowland border with the Highlands begins in the west at Dumbarton (on the north bank of the River Clyde) and progresses northwards and eastwards to embrace an eastern plain which stretches from Fife.
When the earnest Lowlanders, bent on giving surnames to Highlanders who had no surnames and spoke little English, realized the difficulty of their task, they must soon have discovered that the way to find out the 'name' of a Highlander was to question him about his chief.
Scottish poet and author Sir Walter Scot called them "The Children of the Mist." This was a fitting name for a people who from 1488 to 1775 were stripped of all rights as Scottish citizens, and had to avoid all areas of population.
www.hope-of-israel.org /i000066a.htm   (14528 words)

  
 Fraser, Frasier, Frazer, Frazier, Philorth, Saltoun, Aberdeen, Lowlands, Scotland, Scottish, Teutonic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-16)
After the Restoration in 1660, he sat in the Scottish Parliament although he was still prominent enough in court circles to feature in the diaries of Samuel Pepys.
Thorough study of the different characteristics of Highland (Gaelic) and Lowland (Teutonic) history and culture in Scotland, raises some questions regarding this, as it reveals that Aberdeenshire Frasers had never been considered, nor thought of themselves as a Clan.
Though being the senior line of the South Country Lowland family doesn't necessarily make a Clan, as bearing the manner of Gaelic people, historically, is required, it is our privilege to have the Frasers of Philorth, now Saltoun as the senior line of our world family, in any event.
www.fraserclan-cal.net /philorth.html   (1388 words)

  
 Best Scottish Books and Books About Scotland.
He is regarded as a truly inspirational captain whose achievements speak for themselves; numerous Scottish Championships and Cups, captain of the successful European Cup Winners' Cup side of 1972 and the only player to play in three Treble-winning sides.
From the bestselling author of The Lightouse Stevensons, a gripping history of the drama and danger of wrecking since the eighteenth century, and the often grisly ingenuity of Scottish and British wreckers, scavengers of the sea.
It is not generally known that John Logie Baird, the Scottish genius who not only invented television but went on to develop colour and 3D versions of it, wrote his own life story.
www.visitdunkeld.com /best-scottish-books.htm   (2896 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.