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Topic: Scoville scale


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In the News (Thu 25 Apr 19)

  
  Hot Sauce, Chili sauce, Chile Seeds, Chili peppers and lots more.
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper.
Thus a sweet pepper, that contains no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero (no heat detectable even undiluted); whereas the hottest peppers of all, such as habaneross have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
Scoville ratings may vary considerably within a species—easily by a factor of 10 or more—depending on seed lineage, climate and even soil.
www.chilefarm.co.uk /scoville.html   (370 words)

  
  The Scoville Scale
If all known peppers were measured using this technique, their scale of pungency would range from 0 Scoville units, for the bell pepper, to 350,000 units, for the Mexican habanero (Saaristo, 2002).
Naysayers argued that the tongue is too subjective to base an entire scale on, but Scoville replied that the tongue is senstive to less than a millionth of a grain, which certainly has its advantages (Saaristo, 2002).
Scoville also ran into trouble with the number of tests his panelists could perform per day because human tongues temporairly get used to certain levels of pungency and have to be given a rest (Saaristo, 2002).
www.nsac.ns.ca /envsci/staff/jhoyle/students/cw2/scale.html   (496 words)

  
  Scoville scale
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chile.
Thus a sweet pepper, that contains no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero (no heat detectable even undiluted); whereas the hottest chiles, such as habaneros, have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
Scoville ratings may vary considerably within a species—easily by a factor of 10 or more—depending on seed lineage, climate and even soil.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/s/sc/scoville_scale.html   (257 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Scoville scale
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper.
Thus a sweet pepper, that contains no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero (no heat detectable even undiluted); whereas the hottest peppers of all, such as habaneros have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
N.B. Scoville ratings may vary considerably within a species—easily by a factor of 10 or more—depending on seed lineage, climate and even soil.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/sc/Scoville_scale   (211 words)

  
 Scoville scale - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As originally devised, a solution of the pepper extract is diluted in sugar water until the 'heat' is no longer detectable to a panel of (usually five) tasters; the degree of dilution gives its measure on the Scoville scale.
Conversely, the hottest chiles, such as habaneros, have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
Later developments such as high pressure liquid chromatography (also known as the "Gillett Method") have now enabled the Scoville rating to be determined by direct measurement of capsaicin rather than sensory methods.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Scoville_scale   (272 words)

  
 Hotness Ratings
The Scoville Scale The Scoville scale refers to the number of times that extracts of chillies dissolved in alcohol can be diluted with sugar water before the capsaicin can no longer be tasted.
Scoville had been studying the pharmacological uses for the pepper, but became frustrated with the many variables.
Although the American Spice Trade Association is a strong proponent of the machine, Scoville's name is so well established that the association has had about as much success in making people adopt their scale as the US government has had in adopting the metric system.
www.innvista.com /health/foods/vegetables/hotrate.htm   (1039 words)

  
 Wilbur Scoville & Pepper Chemistry
It was in 1912 whilst working for the Parke Davis pharmaceutical company that one of their chemists, Wilbur Scoville, developed a method to measure the heat level of a chile pepper.
In the original test, Scoville blended pure ground chiles with a sugar-water solution and a panel of testers then sipped the concoctions, in increasingly diluted concentrations, until they reached the point at which the liquid no longer burned the mouth.
The pungency of chile peppers is measured in multiples of 100 units, from the bell pepper at zero Scoville units to the incendiary Habanero at 300,000 Scoville units!
www.g6csy.net /chile/scoville.html   (604 words)

  
 Scoville Heat Units - Types of Chile Peppers (a.k.a. Chiles, Chili Peppers or Chilli Peppers)
Relatively mild (3 on a scale of 10), it is the chile of choice for chiles rellenos, and along with the guajillo, and the pasilla, one of the chiles used to make mole sauce; ancho also is used to flavor salsas and dips.
Birdseye: From Africa, the tiny, thin-fleshed birdseye chile is one of the hottest—9 on a scale of 10.
At 577,000 Scoville units, it was the record holder as world’s hottest chile until the discovery of the Bhut Jolokia (typical habañeros range from 200,000 to 300,000 SHUs).
www.thenibble.com /reviews/main/salts/scoville.asp   (4233 words)

  
 Dinning and Food / Koh Samui Thailand
Chile aficionados will brag that their favorite chilies are the hottest, with a scorching 300,000 on the Scoville scale, while that jalapeño you've just learned to love only measures a wimpy 4,000.
Scoville devised a formal test in which exact weights of chilies were dissolved in alcohol and then added to sweetened water in precise measures.
Scoville's test was used for the next six decades, yet it wasn't totally reliable, given the fact that human testers' palates are different and easily fatigued by repeated tasting of hot food.
www.samui.org /dining/food/chilies.htm   (2293 words)

  
 Some like it hot
In the process, he developed the Scoville Organoleptic Test (1912), a psychophysical procedure that identifies the dilution threshold --the amount of stimulus that is just detectable.
Scoville's original test consisted of soaking a specific amount of a chile in alcohol (ethanol) for a specific amount of time.
But the Scoville scale is so popular that on most packages of chile peppers the ASTA units are translated into good old Scoville units.
people.brandeis.edu /~sekuler/SensoryProcessesMaterial/scovilleScale.html   (1089 words)

  
 Ask Mr. Broussard, the TABASCO® Historian: How do scoville units work?
In fact, if all known peppers were measured using this technique, their scale of pungency would range from 0 Scoville units, for the bell pepper, to 350,000 units, for the Mexican habanero.
Scoville tried first to measure pungency by studying how pepper extract reacted with other chemicals but concluded that none was sensitive enough to offer readings with any degree of precision.
Scoville's name has since become closely associated with the measure of pungency, but the oral test is now being slowly replaced by a modern machine (High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph) that is as sensitive as the human tongue.
www.tabasco.com /info_booth/faq/scoville_how.cfm   (703 words)

  
 Scoville Heat Units (SHU)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Scoville Heat Units (SHU) are the standard scale for measuring the heat of chiles (also called chilis in the US or chillis in the UK).
The SHU scale was developed in 1912 by Wilbur Scoville, a chemist with the Parke-Davis pharmaceutical company.
A recent variation of the Scoville rating is the "Official Chile Pepper Heat Scale" which maps SHU values to a number between 0 and 10.
www.garlic-central.com /chiles/scoville.html   (291 words)

  
 All about Chillies Chilies Chillys
Chile aficionados will brag that their favorite chiles are the hottest, with a scorching 300,000 on the Scoville scale, while that jalapeño you've just learned to love only measures a wimpy 4,000.
Scoville devised a formal test in which exact weights of chiles were dissolved in alcohol and then added to sweetened water in precise measures.
Further down on the scale of concentration are the seeds and then the chile's flesh, which has the least amount of capsaicin.
asiarecipe.com /chilies.html   (1624 words)

  
 The Scoville Scale
A scale developed by Wilbur Scoville in 1912, to measure the heat level in chillies.
The greater the number of Scoville units, the hotter the pepper.
The original Scoville test asked a panel of tasters to state when an increasingly dilute solution of the pepper no longer burned the mouth.
www.tlchm.bris.ac.uk /webprojects2000/mbellringer/scoville.htm   (137 words)

  
 Salt-N-Peppers Plus.com- Scoville Scale
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chile.
As originally devised, a solution of the pepper extract is diluted in sugar water until the 'heat' is no longer detectable to a panel of (usually five) tasters; the degree of dilution gives its measure on the Scoville scale.
Thus a sweet pepper, that contains no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero (no heat detectable even undiluted); whereas the hottest chiles, such as habaneros, have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
www.saltnpeppersplus.com /scoville.asp   (358 words)

  
 Scoville Units
The Scoville scale measures how hot a chile pepper is. It does this by measuring the amount of capsaicin in a chile.
It's a myth that the heat is in the seeds: the seeds absorb heat from the ribs.
The scale measured the amount of sugar water required for a taster to no longer be able to detect the heat.
www.practicallyedible.com /edible.nsf/pages/scovilleunits!opendocument   (350 words)

  
 Tom Saaristo The Scoville Scale
Scoville tried first to measure pungency by studying how pepper extract reacted
He thus rated the Japan chiles 20,000 to 30,000 Scoville Heat Units.
Scoville's name has since become closely associated with the measure of pungency,
www.tomsaaristo.com /scoville.html   (687 words)

  
 The Scoville Scale, Scoville Heat Scale, Scoville Heat Index, How Hot Are Peppers?
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a
The greatest weakness of the Scoville Organoleptic Test is its imprecision, because it relies on human subjectivity.
Scoville ratings may vary considerably within a species—easily by a factor of 10 or more—depending on seed
www.chilipepper.com /TheScovilleScale/tabid/59/Default.aspx   (262 words)

  
 Scoville Scale
The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chile pepper (hot pepper).
As originally devised, a solution of the pepper extract is diluted in sugar water until the 'heat' is no longer detectable to a panel of (usually five) tasters; the degree of dilution gives its measure on the Scoville scale.
Conversely, the hottest chiles, such as habaneros, have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable.
www.tropicalhotsauce.com /scovillescale.html   (194 words)

  
 Food › Tabasco Hot Sauce
A pharmacist named Wilbur Scoville invented the Scoville Scale in 1912 to measure the heat of peppers.
A "Scoville Unit" is actually a measure of capsaicin (the chemical in hot peppers that is responsible for their heat).
Scoville's test was a comparative taste test that is considered subjective by today's standards.
www.thatsthespirit.com /en/food/Tabasco/peppers.asp   (318 words)

  
 Articles, What Are Scoville Units?
The Scoville Unit is derived from a series of tests using a solution of water and sugar.
Scoville wrote The Art of Compounding which was first published in 1895 and has gone through at least 8 editions.
Scoville died in 1942 but his name will forever go on with the Scoville Heat Unit and in the lives of chili lovers everywhere.
www.nexwebsites.com /Articles/6252.html   (532 words)

  
 The ChilliWorld guide to Chilli Heat - Measuring Chilli Heat, how hot is that chile or that sauce...
The Scoville scale is a measure of the 'hotness' of a chilli pepper or anything derived from chilli peppers, i.e.
The scale is actually a measure of the concentration of the chemical compound capsaicin which is the active component that produces the heat sensation for humans.
The Scoville rating or 'hotness' of fresh chillies is obviously dependent upon the variety of pepper but even within one particular variety the hotness can vary greatly, this is particularly so of the habaneros where a 10 fold variation is not uncommon.
www.chilliworld.com /FactFile/Measuring_Chilli_Heat.asp   (774 words)

  
 KENNYS GARDEN SPOT- Scoville Scale
It is mostly concentrated in the veins of the pepper, although to a
Scale." This is still the most common system used today to rate the heat
This is why you see a range of scoville units listed beside each pepper species.
www.angelfire.com /pe/kennys/p14.html   (730 words)

  
 The Scoville Scale
There are other methods, but the Scoville Scale remains the most widely used and respected.
The greater the number of Scoville units, the hotter the pepper.
The original Scoville test asked a panel of tasters to state when an increasingly dilute solution of the pepper no longer burned the mouth.
www.chm.bris.ac.uk /motm/chilli/scoville.htm   (137 words)

  
 Scoville Units
The Scoville Organoleptic Test is still used, however it has mostly been replaced by a process called high performance liquid chromatography.
The bell pepper essentially has a rating of zero Scoville Units, thus it acts as the lowest level of heat on the Scoville scale.
Scoville died in 1942 but his name will forever go on with the Scoville Heat Unit and in the lives of chili lovers everywhere.
www.great-salsa.com /scovilleunits.html   (576 words)

  
 Growing Hot Peppers
Scoville developed a scale to rate the various peppers’ ‘fire.’ It goes up from 0 in increments of 100 units, called Scovilles or Scoville units.
Based on this scale you can make more sense of the catalog descriptions and choose peppers that will suit your taste.
Since the capsaicin is produced by glands in those four ribs that divide the cell of the pepper, scraping the inside and removing the seeds will remove the source of the heat and a lot of the pain.
www.emmitsburg.net /gardens/articles/adams/2004/hot_peppers.htm   (841 words)

  
 Science: Did You Know?- The heat of chili peppers actually has its own scale of measurement. Find out more about the ...
In 1912, a man named Wilbur Scoville invented a scale to measure the heat level of chili peppers.
Scoville units measure how hot certain peppers are.
The hottest peppers are the habaneros (they have the highest concentration of capsaicin), which can range from 80,000-more than 300,000 Scoville units.
reference.aol.com /mf_science/_a/the-heat-of-chili-peppers-actually-has/20050126182309990012   (337 words)

  
 Foodie's Corner
The Scoville Organoleptic Test is a test which used a panel of five human heat samplers who tasted and analyzed a solution made from exact weights of chile peppers dissolved in alcohol and then diluted with sugar water.
The ratio of dilution is the Scoville Unit.
The Scoville scale is the food industry unit of measurement for the pungency of hot peppers.
groups.msn.com /FoodiesCorner/scovillescale.msnw   (416 words)

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