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Topic: Scullabogue Barn massacre


  
  Scullabogue Barn massacre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Scullabogue massacre was an atrocity committed on June 5, 1798, during the Irish Rebellion of 1798.
Prior to the battle of New Ross (1798) a farm and out-buildings in the townland of Scullabogue were used as a staging post for rebel forces.
While the memory of this gruesome massacre was regularly summoned to create sectarian divisions in later years, about a dozen of the murdered were Catholic and a proportion of the attackers were Protestant.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Scullabogue_Barn_Massacre   (272 words)

  
 SCULLABOGUE MASSACRE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Scullabogue Massacre In the Irish rebellion of 1798 Scullabogue House, Wexford, was seized by the rebels and used for a prison.
Some thirty or forty prisoners confined in it were brought out and shot in cold blood, when the news of a repulse of the rebels at New Ross arrived (5th June, '98).
The barn at the back of the house was filled with prisoners and set on fire, and Taylor, in his history, written at the time and almost on the spot, puts the number of victims at 184, and he gives the names of several of them.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/SCULLABOGUE+MASSACRE   (248 words)

  
 Battle of New Ross (1798) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
No effort to pursue withdrawing rebels was made but when the town had been secured, a fearful massacre of prisoners, trapped rebels and civilians alike began which continued for days, some of whom were burned alive when rebel casualty station was torched by victorious troops.
Reports of such atrocities brought by escaping rebels are believed to have influenced the retaliatory murder of over 100 loyalists in the flames of Scullabogue Barn.
Casualties in the Battle of New Ross are estimated at 2,500 rebels and 200 Garrison dead.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battle_of_New_Ross_%281798%29   (560 words)

  
 The 1798 Rebellion [Free Republic]
Loyalist historians are also guilty of ignoring or minimising the causes of most of the massacres, the far larger massacres by British army and loyalist forces of civilians, rebel prisoners and wounded.
The scale of this massacre can only be guessed at, but after the battle 3, 400 rebels were buried, 62 cart loads of rebel bodies were thrown in the river and many others (particularly wounded) were burned in the houses of the town.
At Scullabogue around 100 were murdered, 74 were burned alive in a barn, (nine of whom were women and 8 of whom were Catholic) and 21 men were killed on the front lawn.
www.freerepublic.com /forum/a39595df35c10.htm   (8507 words)

  
 Ulster-Scots & Irish Unionist Resource - The Scullabogue Massacre 1798   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The massacre occurred in a farmstead that was located at the foot of Carrickbyrne Hill, the main campsite of the southern division of the Wexford rebel army in the early days of the insurrection.
Efforts to reconstruct the circumstances surrounding the massacre and to detail the killings themselves are hampered by lack of evidence.
All nine were accused of having shot or stabbed prisoners at the doors of the barn and three, Furlong, Leary and Murphy, were identified as having set the straw roof of the barn on fire.
www.ulster-scots.co.uk /docs/articles/historical/scullabogue.htm   (2634 words)

  
 Joyce 1916- 1798 Rebellion
This Wexford rising was not the result of premeditation or of any concert with the Dublin directory of the United Irishmen; for the society had not made much headway among the quiet industrious peasants of that county, who were chiefly descendants of the English colonists.
Then setting fire to a barn in which the others were locked up- between one and two hundred - they burned them all to death.
No recognised leader was present at this barbarous massacre; it was the work of an irresponsible rabble.
www.celticcousins.net /ireland/joycerebellionof1798.htm   (2380 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Scullabogue Barn Massacre   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining.
The Battle of New Ross took place in county Wexford in south-eastern Ireland, during the Irish Rebellion of 1798.
Jump to: navigation, search New Ross (Ros Mhic Thriúin in Irish) is a town in southwest County Wexford, Republic of Ireland, in the southeast of Ireland.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Scullabogue-Barn-Massacre   (433 words)

  
 Barn   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The units for cross-sections were christened Barns, (10^-24 cm^2) and the book containing cross-sections has a picture of a barn on the cover.
A barn is an agricultural building used for storage and as a covered workplace.
"Barn" is suggested in spellcheckers for the following: aarn, aborn, Abrdn, arn, Baarh, bahn, Bahru, bann, banre, barc, baren, barin, barne, Barni, Barnt, barny, barp, barq, baru, barx, Batn, batrun, baun, bayn, benr, Beorn, berno, berny, birn, Bjarne, blarn, bornn, brana, brano, brj, Gbargna, jarn, narn, varn.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /ID/De/ba/barn.html   (2669 words)

  
 Networking and Network Security   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Scullabogue Massacre was an atrocity committed on June 5th 1798, during the
Following the disasterous defeat at New Ross, fleeing and panicked surviving rebels brought news of military atrocities, including the incineration of rebel wounded in their makeshift hospital, which incensed elements of the rebel forces stationed at Scullabogue.
While the memory of this gruesome massacre was regularly summoned to create sectarian divisions in later years, a large proportion of the murdered were Catholic and many of the attackers were
www.subnetworking.com /wiki/Scullabogue_Barn_Massacre   (249 words)

  
 Barn   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Although not an official SI unit, it is widely used by nuclear physicists as it is considered to be "as big as a barn" compared to the typical cross sections for nuclear reactions.
Cot, cabin, hut, chalet, croft, shed, booth, stall, hovel, bothy, shanty, dugout, wigwam; pen; (inclosure); barn, bawn; kennel, sty, doghold, cote, coop, hutch, byre; cow house, cow shed; stable, dovecote, columbary, columbarium; shippen; igloo, iglu, jacal; lacustrine dwelling, lacuslake dwelling, lacuspile dwelling; log cabin, log house; shack, shebang, tepee, topek.
Cage, terrarium, doghouse; pen, aviary; barn, stall; zoo.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /Ba/Barn.html   (2669 words)

  
 Contesting History - Module Four Key Terms - Department of Modern History - Trinity College Dublin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The most infamous incident was the burning to death by rebels of nearly 200 Protestants (and some Catholics) in a barn in Scullabogue on 5 June.
The massacre seems to have been precipitated by news from retreating rebels from New Ross that the government had triumphed and rumours of mass executions after the battle.
The massacre, which was roundly condemned by the Wexford United Irish leadership, served to heighten Protestant fears that the rebellion was merely an excuse for their persecution and slaughter.
www.tcd.ie /Modern_History/Contesting/Module4/key_terms.php   (753 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
On their March northward from Vinegar Hill to Arklow in Co. Wicklow, they plundered and burnt all the houses and fields belonging to the Protestants.
There have been unproven stories that a Hollingsworth - direct ancestor of the editor - died in the awful massacre of over 200 Protestant men, women and babies, (none of them Military personnel) in "Scullabogue House & Barn" near New Ross on June 5, 1798.
Whether or not this is true, those who lost any property were obliged to put in Compensation Claims for it, and its value.
homepages.rootsweb.com /~jayken/hollingsworth/hr/650103119.htm   (310 words)

  
 The Lilliput Press   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
These, he argues, failed to properly educate a community about the harrowing truths of its own past - with leading historians complicit in a sanitized and politically correct version of what were actually profoundly brutal and divisive events.
Confronting this amnesia and denial head-on, Dunne focuses on a single bloody day, 5 June 1798, which saw a crushing defeat for the United Irishmen in the battle of New Ross and the massacre by rebels of 150 non-combatant Protestant men, women and children in a barn at Scullabogue.
Here Dunne here fuses the personal - a well-remembered ancestor of his died heroically at New Ross - with the professional, tracing historical accounts of this day across two centuries reassembling the 'shards of memory' into a subversive exposition of how ideology distorts memory.
www.lilliputpress.ie /listbook.html?oid=9312623   (363 words)

  
 The Other View - Issue 4 - Page 11
Although revisionists would have it otherwise, it is exceedingly difficult to view the rebellion in south Leinster as being other than largely sectarian rather than political in character with theological fanaticism playing a significant part.
The massacre of between one hundred and two hundred Protestants (and some Roman Catholic servants) in a barn at Scullabogue, Co. Wexford, cannot easily be conjured away.
Protestants were few in Connaught and Humbert imposed strict discipline on his followers, so although the trappings of sectarianism were in evidence, there were no sectarian massacres.
www.theotherview.net /pg11-4.html   (1237 words)

  
 Playing Handball Against a Haystack: A Response to Brian Hanley's Defence of Peter Hart - Cork Miscellaneous - ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A useful comparison here is with the Scullabogue massacre of 1798 which is also often presented as a sectarian attack.
But in that case number among the 100 victims were 8 catholics which suggest the motivation for that massacre was political (the victims were loyalists) rather than sectarian.
The memory of this massacre was indeed regularly used to forment sectarian division.
www.indymedia.ie /newswire.php?story_id=70063&search_text=Peter+Hart   (6581 words)

  
 Scullabogue Massacre   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
They were placed in a house and adjoining barn on property owned by a British loayalist who had fled in an area called Scullabogue with 200 other Protestants or suspected sympathizers of the British.
The Protestant surviving families of those who were murdered at Scullabogue could petition the government for property losses in the taking of the hostages, as things were stolen or destroyed.
This the Scullabogue main house as it is in 1998, but which housed the some prisoners and their rebel keepers in 1798
www.monck.com /Scullabogue.html   (711 words)

  
 [No title]
The massacre of St. Bartholomew had taken place in France; Philip II had ordered a _Te Deum_ to be sung at Madrid, and the Pope had had a medal struck to commemorate the glorious event.
The lowest computation of those put to death for heresy in the Netherlands by Charles V was 50,000; and his successor had, at the instigation of the Holy Office, issued a proclamation sentencing to death the whole population--men, women and children--with the exception of a few persons specially named.
The stories told of the actual outbreak of the rebellion are interesting as an illustration of the universal habit of exaggeration about Irish affairs, to which I have already alluded.
www.gutenberg.org /dirs/1/3/1/5/13157/13157.txt   (16833 words)

  
 RootsWeb: GENIRE-L Re: Scullabogue Massacre -Keatings
"In the Irish rebellion of 1798 Scullabogue House, Wexford,
Re: Scullabogue Keatings by "O, Nameless One" < >
Re: Scullabogue Massacre -Keatings by "O, Nameless One" < >
archiver.rootsweb.com /th/read/GENIRE/2002-06/1024012593   (149 words)

  
 Is Ulster Right?, August 2004
The massacre of St. Bartholomew had taken place in France; Philip II had ordered a Te Deum to be sung at Madrid, and the Pope had had a medal struck to commemorate the glorious event.
The lowest computation of those put to death for heresy in the Netherlands by Charles V was 50,000; and his successor had, at the instigation of the Holy Office, issued a proclamation sentencing to death the whole population-men, women and children-with the exception of a few persons specially named.
The Irish Protestants saw with alarm that amongst the soldiers who came from France to aid King James were some who had taken an active part in the dragonnades organized by Louis XIV in order to carry out his edict.
www.gutenberg.org /files/13157/13157-h/13157-h.htm   (16187 words)

  
 Contesting History - Module Four Page 5 - Department of Modern History - Trinity College Dublin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In this section Musgrave provides a description of the most infamous example of sectarian violence in the Wexford rebellion, the burning to death of some 200 Protestant prisoners in a barn in Scullabogue.
I contemplate with horror, and relate with reluctance, an occurrence which took place on the day of the battle of [New] Ross [5 June 1798], which will remain a lasting disgrace to human nature, and an indelible stain on the county of Wexford.
During the encampment of the rebels on Carrickbyrne hill, a party of them was posted at Scullabogue, within half a mile of the camp, where a barn was converted into a prison for the confinement of Protestant prisoners.
www.tcd.ie /Modern_History/Contesting/Module4/page5.php   (488 words)

  
 RootsWeb: GENIRE-L Re: Vinegar Hill
> windmill stood on top of the hill and a barn at the foot.
> windmill was filled from the barn, and the barn from the surrounding
> their massacre, signed by a priest, they were brought out one by one and
archiver.rootsweb.com /th/read/GENIRE/1998-01/0886048305   (573 words)

  
 [No title]
The commanding general of the army and the department commander were sent to the Indian Territory, and nearly one-fourth of the army was concentrated in that department to prevent a serious outbreak, endangering the peace of Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas, by the same Indians who are now in a threatening condition.
Again, take the Sioux nation that committed the terrible massacre of 62 in Minnesota, in which it was authoritatively stated that one thousand lives were lost, and a very large military force was employed to bring them under control.
In 1867 the Sioux were again in a condition of hostility, and the Fetterman massacre occurred, the Indians being led by the same man (Red Cloud) who is said recently to have been instrumental in causing dissatisfaction among the different tribes.
lcweb2.loc.gov /ndlpcoop/nicmoas/nora/nora0152.sgm   (17703 words)

  
 Triskelle - Irish History - Rebellion of 1798
Later in his life General Lake would look back on this battle and conclude that the rebels made a tolerable good fight of it.
After the massacre at Vinegar Hill the contending parties resorted to an uncoordinated and undisciplined rage of bloodlust.
While one the run the rebels killed about 100 loyalists in a barn in Scullabogue and 70 Protestant prisoners were piked on a bridge at Wexford town.
www.vincentpeters.nl /triskelle/history/rebellionof1798.php?index=060.050.020   (1425 words)

  
 [No title]
The rebellion in Leinster was broken by the government forces at the Battle of Vinegar Hill.
However, the massacre of between one hundred and two hundred Protestants (and some Roman Catholic servants) in a barn at Scullabogue, Co. Wexford, coloured Protestant and Presbyterian perceptions of the rebellion and, indeed, continues to do so, occupying a place of greater prominence than the Battle of Antrim or the Battle of Ballynahinch.
The final act of the 1798 rebellion was played out in October when Wolfe Tone arrived belatedly with a French squadron which was defeated off the coast of Donegal.
www.ulsterscotsagency.com /siteFiles/resources/the1798rebellioninulster.doc   (1972 words)

  
 RTE Online - Television - The View
His new book, 'Rebellions - Memoir, Memory and 1798' is not what you'd call a typical history book.
Although it contains a historical analysis of the events in Wexford in 1798, particularly the rebel's defeat at the battle of New Ross and the massacre of over 100 innocent Protestants by rebels in a barn at Scullabogue, it begins with a very personal memoir about its author's family and childhood.
This shows how far the author has moved from the nationalist version of events his mother, and others, once held dear but, as the blurb on the cover makes clear, it is also a polemic.
www.rte.ie /arts/2004/0217/theview.html   (694 words)

  
 Is Ulster Right? by Anonymous - Full Text Free Book (Part 2/4)
massacre are sung at Nationalist gatherings; and W. Redmond, speaking
at Enniscorthy (close to the scene of the massacre) on the 110th
barn at Scullabogue or piked the Protestants on Wexford Bridge."
www.fullbooks.com /Is-Ulster-Right-2.html   (17575 words)

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