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Topic: Second Opium War


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  China opium war - Interactivist Info Exchange | Yoshie Furuhashi, "A New Opium War"
Opium War The Opium War (1840-1842), also called the Anglo-Chinese War, was the most humiliating defeat China ever suffered.
The British defeated the Chinese in the Opium Wars from 1839 to 1842.
The British and Dutch in Asia to 1830; the Middle East to 1830; Britain in India and Afghanistan to 1850; China and the Opium War; the Crimean War.
basebase.info /smyj/china-opium-war.html   (1381 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Second Opium War
The Second Opium War or Arrow War began in 1856 and ended in 1860.
The Chinese boarded the Arrow, a Chinese-owned ship registered in Hong Kong flying the British flag and suspected of piracy, smuggling and of being engaged in illegal opium trade.
In June 1858 the first part of the war ended with the Treaties of Tianjin[?], to which France, Russia, and the United States were party.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/se/Second_Opium_War   (335 words)

  
 Drug Policy Alliance: Opium and the British Indian Empire
To support its general conclusion that opium was not harmful in the Indian context, the Commission relied heavily upon an analysis of the evidence developed in a separate memorandum by Sir William Roberts.
The respondents agreed that opium use was widespread and generally moderate; that long-term users tended to find a tolerable dosage level and to maintain that without change; that moderate opium use rarely led to excessive consumption; and that its medical value to the population of India very great.
Opium is amazingly cheap, duty included; it prolongs life after a certain age, and it can be asserted with all the force of truth and seriousness that its substitution in place of alcohol,… will bring back happiness to thousands of families in Great Britain and Ireland where there is no happiness now.
www.drugpolicy.org /library/opium_india.cfm   (5846 words)

  
  Opium Wars - MSN Encarta
The wars are so named because they centered on the trade of opium, a powerful narcotic that British merchants were smuggling into China in vast quantities.
The importation and cultivation of opium were outlawed in China in 1796, reflecting the inroads that Indian opium had made there, but the ban was ineffective.
The breakup of the EEIC monopoly was the immediate cause of the First Opium War, both because it led to a huge increase in opium traffic and because, without the EEIC to serve as a buffer, the British government now found itself obliged to intervene more frequently in China.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761553669/Opium_Wars.html   (1161 words)

  
 Opium Abuse Treatment
Opium is the milky latex fluid contained in the un-ripened seed pod of the opium poppy.
Opium is grown mainly in Myanmar (formerly Burma) and Afghanistan.
A second conference, held in The Hague in 1913, was equally unsuccessful in effectuating the convention and it was only at the third conference in The Hague in 1914 that a protocol was signed allowing the convention to take effect without the signatures of all the participating countries.
www.drug-abuse-treatment.org /opium.htm   (2496 words)

  
 Opium Wars - MSN Encarta
The Second Opium War was in many ways an inevitable sequel to the first.
The Arrow Incident of 1856 was the spark that ignited the Second Opium War.
The wars, and the unequal treaties forced on the Chinese by the West, compromised China’s sovereignty and weakened the country’s political institutions during a crucial period in its history.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761553669_2/Opium_Wars.html   (589 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Second Opium War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Second Opium War or Arrow War was a war of the United Kingdom and France against the Qing Dynasty of China from 1856 to 1860.
The war may be viewed as a continuation of the First Opium War (1839-1842), thus the title of the Second Opium War.
Opium use, was not regarded as a problem, until it became apparent that the working-classes were clearly abusing the substance.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Second-Opium-War   (5276 words)

  
 Karl Marx in New York Daily Tribune
Besides its negative result, the first opium-war succeeded in stimulating the opium trade at the expense of legitimate commerce, and so will this second opium-war do if England be not forced by the general pressure of the civilized world to abandon the compulsory opium cultivation in India and the armed opium propaganda to China.
Opium was legally admitted in China on the payment of a duty of about $3 per chest, as a medicine; the Portuguese, who brought it from Turkey, being its almost exclusive importers into the Celestial Empire.
The opium monopoly was established in India; while the Company's own ships were hypocritically forbidden from trafficking in the drug, the licences it granted for private ships trading to China containing a provision which attached a penalty to them if freighted with opium of other than the Company's own make.
www.marxists.org /archive/marx/works/1858/09/20.htm   (910 words)

  
 First Opium War
The First Opium War was a trade-inspired war between the United Kingdom and China from 1839 to 1842.
However, the next month two British sailors murdered a Chinese man, and were tried under the principle of extraterritoriality: the sailors were brought to justice in a British court in Canton (modern-day Guangzhou).
The war finally ended in August 1842, with the Treaty of Nanking.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/fi/First_Opium_War.html   (447 words)

  
 Second Opium War   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The war may be viewed as a continuation of the First Opium War (1839 - 1842), thus the name of Second Opium War.
In June 1858 the first part of the war ended with the Treaty of Tientsin, to which France, Russia, and the United States were party.
Co-curated by Barbara Hodgson (author of Opium: A Portrait of the Heavenly Demon), the exhibit "traces opium from ancient cultures to the shores of North America, revealing on the way, both the miraculous and devastating effects of opium and its derivatives".
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Second_Opium_War.html   (1299 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Second Opium War - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Second Opium War or Arrow War was a war of the United Kingdom and France against the Qing Dynasty of China from 1856 to 1860.
The war may be viewed as a continuation of the First Opium War (1839-1842), thus the title of the Second Opium War.
The opium trade was legalized and Christians were granted full civil rights, including the right to own property, and the right to evangelize.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Second_Opium_War   (1871 words)

  
 opiumwar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Opium Wars would end up having lasting effects on China that are evident even in the present day.
Opium was forbidden in China except for medicinal use.
This war (and the second Opium War) were fought to determine the relations between China and the West, and as a result China was forced to reevaluate her position as the center of the world.
www.mcps.k12.md.us /departments/isa/ninvest/imperial/opiumwar.htm   (471 words)

  
 war and social upheaval : Opium War
The Opium War was a war between the United Kingdom and Imperial China.
The War ended in 1842 with the Treaty of Nanking which opened specified Chinese ports to foreign trade and the cession by China of the island of Hong Kong to the British.
The war was a humiliating defeat for the Imperial Government and descredited it in the eyes of the Chinese people, especially the rising generation.
histclo.com /essay/war/war-ow.html   (2336 words)

  
 The opium war and decision to learn from the west
The opium war and the treaty of Nanking (nanjing)
It was followed by a series of military defeats of China in the rest of the 19th century: the Second Opium War (1858-60); the Sino-French War (1884-85); the Sino-Japanese War (1894-95), and finally, the retaliation of the Eight Allied Forces against China (1900-01).
The Opium War was started by the British over Chinese banning of opium trade: the British merchants petitioned the British parliament to send troops to retaliate against the Chinese government because it banned British opium, grown in India, to be sold in China.
www.iun.edu /~hisdcl/h207_2002/opiumwar.htm   (464 words)

  
 the opium wars
Opium is a preparation made from the juice of poppy seedpods, and used to produce heroin.
In the 15th century, when opium was first introduced to China, it was used as medicine to treat diseases such as dysentery, cholera, as well as diarrhea.
The British merchants’ incentive for importing opium from India to China was to balance out their tea trade with China, and to stop the silver and gold from draining in what could have been a one-sided trade.
bosp.kcc.hawaii.edu /Horizons/Horizons2002/The_Opium_Wars.html   (1254 words)

  
 Ch'ing China: The Opium Wars
His express purpose was to cut off the opium trade at its source by rooting out corrupt officials and cracking down on British trade in the drug.
He was first to see that the war was about technological superiority; his influence, however, had dwindled to nothing, so his admonitions fell on deaf ears.
The most ignominious of the provisions in these treaties was the complete legalization of opium and the humiliating provision that allowed for the free and unrestricted propagation of Christianity in all regions of China.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/CHING/OPIUM.HTM   (1237 words)

  
 A Short History of the Opium Wars
Most opium came from Turkey or India, and in 1800 its import was forbidden by the imperial government.
In the spring of 1839 Chinese authorities at Canton confiscated and burned the opium.
In the war that followed, the Chinese could not match the technological and tactical superiority of the British forces.
mojo.calyx.net /~schaffer/heroin/opiwar1.html   (692 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Opium Wars (), or the Anglo-Chinese Wars were two wars fought in the mid-1800s that were the climax of a long dispute between China and Britain.
The Opium Wars and the unequal treaties signed afterwards led in part to the downfall of the Qing Empire, as many countries followed Britain and forced unequal terms of trade with China.
In March of 1839, a new commissioner, Lin Zexu was appointed by the emperor to control the opium trade at the port of Canton.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Opium_War   (1298 words)

  
 Women of the American Civil War Era
The war does not go well for the South, and when the North's cannons destroy the city, George is horrified.
During the Civil War, Mary Adams wants to do more than work at the aid society so she sets out for the front lines, where she cleans the wounds of Lynn Rhodes and then conceals the fact that Lynn is female.
Her widowed mother made it clear that 14-year-old James was now in charge of the running of the plantation and the protection of the rest of the family.
www.americancivilwar.com /women/women.html   (1589 words)

  
 Short History of the Opium Wars   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Most opium came from India, and in 1800 its import was forbidden by the imperial Chinese government.
Opium smuggling tiled the balance of trade in favor of the West and hurt China's economy.
The British and French defeated China in a second opium war in 1856.
home.comcast.net /~glennwatson550/worksheets/opium.html   (562 words)

  
 [2] Boodle Boys
Opium was the tool of the capitalist classes in transforming the peasantry and in monetizing their subsistence lifestyles.
The Greeks looked to opium as both a medicine and a magical talisman within their mythos—a "sacred plant to which were consecrated altars and priests." Then circa 600 B.C. the Greek culture began transforming from one of magic and myth to one encouraging reason and the study of knowledge.
The opium trade sparked when the smoking of opium was "introduced." Sailors in the tropics—some for a medicinal benefit against tropical maladies—began to mix opium with their tobacco in their pipes in the late 1500s.
www.ctrl.org /boodleboys/boddlesboys2.html   (4200 words)

  
 The War in Afghanistan: Drugs, Money Laundering and the Banking System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Second Opium War was fought with the Treaty of Nanjing as its justification and led to further subjection of China by foreign and colonial powers, including the stationing of foreign troops in the Chinese capital, the ceding of Hong Kong and Macau, and the loss of Chinese territory.
The legacy of opium in Afghanistan is a result of the both the historic drug trade sponsored by the British and the devastation of Afghanistan during the American-Pakistani initiated Soviet-Afghan War.
It is during the Soviet-Afghan war that the large scale commercial cultivation of opium was launch in Afghanistan, supported and protected by Pakistani and U.S. intelligence.
www.globalresearch.ca /index.php?context=viewArticle&code=NAZ20061017&articleId=3516   (4611 words)

  
 Opium Wars
Two wars, the First Opium War (1839–42) and the Second Opium War (1856–60), waged by Britain against China to enforce the opening of Chinese ports to trade in opium.
The First Opium War resulted in the cession of Hong Kong to Britain and the opening of five treaty ports.
The Second Opium War followed, with Britain and France in alliance against China, when there was further Chinese resistance to the opium trade.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0011448.html   (288 words)

  
 A Short History of the Opium Wars
Most opium came from Turkey or India, and in 1800 its import was forbidden by the imperial government.
In the spring of 1839 Chinese authorities at Canton confiscated and burned the opium.
In the war that followed, the Chinese could not match the technological and tactical superiority of the British forces.
www.druglibrary.org /schaffer/heroin/opiwar1.htm   (706 words)

  
 Second Opium War - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In June 1858 the first part of the war ended with the Treaty of Tientsin, to which France, Russia, and the United States were party.
After the Xianfeng emperor and his entourage fled Peking, the June 1858 Treaty of Tientsin was finally ratified by the emperor's brother Prince Gong in the Convention of Peking on October 18, 1860, bringing The Second Opium War to an end.
The opium trade was legalized and Christians were granted full civil rights, including the right to own property, and the right to evangalize.
www.tvwiki.tv /wiki/Second_Opium_War   (1337 words)

  
 How China got rid of opium
But because opium was relatively rare and therefore expensive, it affected only the well-to-do, primarily young men of wealthy families, among whom it was regarded as a status symbol.
Opium presently became so widespread that by 1838, officials in Guangdong and Fujian were notifying the Imperial government that nine people out of ten in these provinces were addicts.
A second Opium War (fought from 1856 to 1858) removed the final restraint on drug traffic, and by 1880, China was importing more than 6,500 tons of opium a year.
sacu.org /opium.html   (1360 words)

  
 The Taiping Rebellion and Second Opium War
Settlement of the First Opium War in 1842 Treaty of Nanjing) had been viewed by the Chinese as unfair, and the British were unhappy because profits were not what they had hoped they would be and because they believed that the Chinese were slow in implementing the Nanjing agreements involving trade.
Opium, meanwhile, continued to be smuggled into China, which contributed to Chinese officials and others resenting foreigners.
It favored chastity and an end to foot-binding for women and was opposed to opium smoking.
www.fsmitha.com /h3/h38china.htm   (857 words)

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