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Topic: Sedition


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  Legal Definition of Sedition
SEDITION - Conduct which is directed against a government and which tends toward insurrection but does not amount to treason.
The distinction between sedition and treason consists in this, that though its ultimate object is a violation of the public peace, or at least such a course of measures as evidently engenders it, yet it does not aim at direct and open violence against the laws, or the subversion of the Constitution.
Verbal is inferred from the uttering of words tending to create discord between the king and his people; real sedition is generally committed by convocating together any considerable number of people, without lawful authority, under the pretence of redressing some public grievance, to the disturbing of the public peace.
www.lectlaw.com /def2/s020.htm   (227 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Sedition usually involves actually conspiring to disrupt the legal operation of the government and is beyond expression of an opinion or protesting government policy.
Sedition is a lesser crime than "treason," which requires actual betrayal of the government, or "espionage." Espionage involves spying on the government, trading state secrets (particularly military) to another country (even a friendly nation), or sabotaging governmental facilities, equipment or suppliers of the government, like an aircraft factory.
During U.S. participation in World War II (1941-1945) several leaders of the German-American Bund, a pro-Nazi organization, were tried and convicted of sedition for actively interfering with the war effort.
dictionary.law.com /definition2.asp?selected=1903&bold=||||   (163 words)

  
  sedition - Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
sedition, in law, acts or words tending to upset the authority of a government.
The Sedition Act of 1798 generated so much opposition (see Alien and Sedition Acts) that similar statutes were not enacted until the 20th cent.
The war on sedition: "Anglosphere" allies crack down on speech in the name of fighting terror.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-sedition.html   (571 words)

  
 : Sedition Law in Australia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The definition of ‘sedition’ and ‘seditious intention’ is central to the debate surrounding recent reforms to the old sedition laws in Australia.
Those who are critical of the changes argue that the term ‘sedition’ in the reformed legislation is a misnomer, as some of the key reforms do not fall within the classic definition of ‘sedition’ at all.
In 2005 the Federal Government argued that the reasons for revitalising the sedition offences were to: (i) prevent terrorism; (ii) protect the integrity of the electoral process; (iii) protect public order from threats posed by inter-group violence; and (iv) prevent seditious or treasonous speech in the classic sense.
www.artslaw.com.au /LegalInformation/Sedition/default.asp   (1422 words)

  
 ALRC sedition review
As the sedition offences are a threat to freedom and they serve an objective already adequately addressed in legislation, the Australian Press Council recommends that those sections of the legislation that deal with sedition offences be removed from the Criminal Code.
Some commentators who have expressed views on the sedition legislation have emphasised that journalists, artists and others who seek legitimately to exercise their right to freedom of expression are unlikely to be prosecuted under the legislation and even less likely to be convicted.
It is apparent that, while the relevant legislation refers to "sedition", the activity that the legislation seeks to prohibit is the incitement of terrorism.
www.presscouncil.org.au /pcsite/fop/fop_subs/sedition_alrc.html   (1340 words)

  
 In Good Faith : Sedition Law in Australia
Appendix B shows the seditions provisions in the Crimes Act immediately before their repeal, while Appendix C shows the current provisions in the Criminal Code and the Crimes Act.
When introducing the sedition law amendments on 3 November 2005, the Attorney-General announced that they would be reviewed by the Government in 2006.
In most democracies, sedition laws are rarely used, but in other countries they continue to be used to suppress the media and there have been several recent incidents of prosecutions.
www.aph.gov.au /library/intguide/law/sedition.htm   (5525 words)

  
 The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 | Early America's Milestone Historic Documents
Known collectively as the Alien and Sedition Acts, the legislation sponsored by the Federalists was also intended to quell any political opposition from the Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson.
The last of the laws, the Sedition Act, passed on July 14 declared that any treasonable activity, including the publication of "any false, scandalous and malicious writing," was a high misdemeanor, punishable by fine and imprisonment.
Indeed, public opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts was so great that they were in part responsible for the election of Thomas Jefferson, a Republican, to the presidency in 1800.
earlyamerica.com /earlyamerica/milestones/sedition   (322 words)

  
 Our Documents - Alien and Sedition Acts (1798)
Passed in preparation for an anticipated war with France, the Alien and Sedition Acts tightened restrictions on foreign-born Americans and limited speech critical of the Government.
These laws raised the residency requirements for citizenship from 5 to 14 years, authorized the President to deport aliens, and permitted their arrest, imprisonment, and deportation during wartime.
Sedition Act trials, along with the Senate’s use of its contempt powers to suppress dissent, set off a firestorm of criticism against the Federalists and contributed to their defeat in the election of 1800, after which the acts were repealed or allowed to expire.
www.ourdocuments.gov /doc.php?flash=true&doc=16   (311 words)

  
 The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 | Early America's Milestone Historic Documents
Known collectively as the Alien and Sedition Acts, the legislation sponsored by the Federalists was also intended to quell any political opposition from the Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson.
The last of the laws, the Sedition Act, passed on July 14 declared that any treasonable activity, including the publication of "any false, scandalous and malicious writing," was a high misdemeanor, punishable by fine and imprisonment.
Indeed, public opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts was so great that they were in part responsible for the election of Thomas Jefferson, a Republican, to the presidency in 1800.
www.earlyamerica.com /earlyamerica/milestones/sedition   (322 words)

  
 VA Nurse Investigated for “Sedition” for Criticizing Bush | The Progressive
Worry not about "sedition" on the part of a VA employee who exercises her First Amendment Right to free speech, worry instead about the blatant deception of those members of the National Security Council who purposely disregarded Presidential Directives issued during NSC meetings, during wartime.
The Sedition Act of 1918 was an amendment to the Espionage Act of 1917.
The Sedition Act was the most recent attempt by the United States government to limit “freedom of speech,” in-so-much-as that “freedom of speech” related to the criticism of the government, or, more applicably, the political policies of the presidential administration or congressional majority.
www.progressive.org /mag_mc020806   (5988 words)

  
  VA Nurse Investigated for “Sedition” for Criticizing Bush | The Progressive
Sedition usually involves actually conspiring to disrupt the legal operation of the government and is beyond expression of an opinion or protesting government policy.
Sedition is a lesser crime than "treason," which requires actual betrayal of the government, or "espionage." Espionage involves spying on the government, trading state secrets (particularly military) to another country (even a friendly nation), or sabotaging governmental facilities, equipment or suppliers of the government, like an aircraft factory.
The Sedition Act was the most recent attempt by the United States government to limit “freedom of speech,” in-so-much-as that “freedom of speech” related to the criticism of the government, or, more applicably, the political policies of the presidential administration or congressional majority.
progressive.org /mag_mc020806   (5655 words)

  
  Sedition - LoveToKnow 1911
A very large number of acts of the Scottish parliament dealt with sedition, beginning as early as 1184 with the assize of William the Lion, c.
A soldier joining any sedition or who, being present at any sedition, does not use his utmost endeavour to suppress the same, is punishable with death or such other punishment as a court-martial shall direct (U.S. Rev. Stats.
Sedition is also dealt with by the state laws mostly in a very liberal spirit.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Sedition   (895 words)

  
 SUMMA THEOLOGICA: Sedition (Secunda Secundae Partis, Q. 42)
Therefore, seemingly, the sin of sedition is not distinct from that of schism.
A seditious man is one who incites others to sedition, and since sedition denotes a kind of discord, it follows that a seditious man is one who creates discord, not of any kind, but between the parts of a multitude.
ecclesiastical unity, whereas sedition is contrary to the temporal or secular unity of the multitude, for instance of a city or kingdom.
www.newadvent.org /summa/3042.htm   (962 words)

  
 Alien and Sedition Acts: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
The Alien and Sedition Acts provoked the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions and did much to unify the Republican party and to foster Republican victory in the election of 1800.
The Sedition Trial was a farce...ended: The mass sedition trial has seemingly...commission of unlawful acts, hence the irrelevancy...evidence of any acts in violation of the...organizations behind the Sedition Trial was the Bnai...
Sedition Act of 1798 generated so much opposition (see Alien and Sedition Acts) that similar statutes were not enacted until the...During World War I the Espionage Act (1917) and the Sedition Act (1918) punished speeches and writings that interfered...
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/alien_and_sedition_acts.jsp   (1821 words)

  
 Alien and Sedition Acts at AllExperts
The Alien and Sedition Acts were acts of Congress passed during the administration of President John Adams; his signature made them into law on July 14, 1798.
For example, the Republicans and a number of moderate Federalists successfully added language to the Sedition Act that by its terms required "a false, scandalous and malicious writing", pointing to the trial of John Peter Zenger that established that colonial courts might treat truth as a defense to libel.
The Alien and Sedition Acts were not appealed to the Supreme Court for review, though individual Supreme Court Justices, sitting in circuit, heard many of the cases prosecuting opponents of the Federalists.
en.allexperts.com /e/a/al/alien_and_sedition_acts.htm   (1321 words)

  
 Sedition   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Sedition usually involves actually conspiring to disrupt the legal operation of the government and is beyond expression of an opinion or protesting government policy.
Sedition is a lesser crime than "treason," which requires actual betrayal of the government, or "espionage." Espionage involves spying on the government, trading state secrets (particularly military) to another country (even a friendly nation), or sabotaging governmental facilities, equipment or suppliers of the government, like an aircraft factory.
During U.S. participation in World War II (1941-1945) several leaders of the German-American Bund, a pro-Nazi organization, were tried and convicted of sedition for actively interfering with the war effort.
www.thelawencyclopedia.com /term/sedition   (214 words)

  
 Sedition Act of 1918 at AllExperts
The Sedition Act of 1918 was an amendment to the Espionage Act of 1917 passed at the urging of President Woodrow Wilson, who was concerned any widespread dissent in time of war constituted a real threat to an American victory.
The Sedition Act forbade Americans to use "disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language" about the United States government, flag, or armed forces during war.
The Sedition Act was an attempt by the United States government to limit "freedom of speech," in-so-much-as that "freedom of speech" related to the criticism of the government during war.
en.allexperts.com /e/s/se/sedition_act_of_1918.htm   (463 words)

  
 Alien and Sedition Acts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Sedition Law failed to coincide with this amendment in that it criminalized the exercise of free speech, and possibly of the press.
This is a clear violation of the Constitution, and to uphold it would, as the Sedition Law would, undermine the very foundation of the government.
Since the Alien and Sedition Acts greatly threatened the authority of the Bill of Rights and therefore the fundamental government, it is surprising to consider that some of the opposition's responses proposed similar threats to central government.
www.usahistory.com /essays/essay009.htm   (898 words)

  
 Sedition and Treason: Overview
This note considers sedition and treason law, including government responses to seditious content on the net and prohibitions on membership of or support for particular organisations.
Historically the legal codes of most nations have featured explicit restrictions on sedition, ie against advocacy of overthrowing those in power or merely disrespect for their persons and status.
Notions of treason, sedition and revolt in early modern western states centred on the monarch, encompassing offences such as taking up arms against the king, refusing to recognise the monarch's authority (eg refusing to pay taxes, respect magistrates or disperse when ordered) and sleeping with the king's wife.
www.caslon.com.au /seditionnote.htm   (1755 words)

  
 The Sedition Act: Repressive Laws - Post-Election Repression in Malaysia (UMNO / Anwar Ibrahim /Human Rights Watch / ...
In addition, although numerous police reports alleging acts of sedition were filed against ruling party officials and allies during the same period, only opposition figures were arrested.
The Court upheld his sentence of two concurrent eighteen-month prison terms for sedition and malicious publishing of false news in connection with statements he made and published in 1995 accusing the Malaysia's Attorney General of mishandling allegations of statutory rape of a schoolgirl made against the Chief Minister of Malacca.
Because of his conviction, Lim Guan Eng was disqualified from being a member of parliament or holding elective office, was prohibited from holding any position in a political party for five years, and was barred from pursuing his profession as an accountant.
www.hrw.org /campaigns/malaysia/2000/laws-sedition.htm   (597 words)

  
 John Shields: Sedition
Sedition is a word that evokes an emotional response in almost everyone.
Sedition is defined as a resistance to, or insurrection against, lawful authority.
Durbin's statements are an act of sedition because they are now being used against our troops since Al-Jazeera is using his words on a daily basis as part of their TV broadcasts.
www.military.com /Opinions/0,,Shields_071405,00.html   (1046 words)

  
 Sedition: our cross to bear? - General - In Depth - theage.com.au
Sedition had to be deliberate, although this is not the case under the Government's counter-terrorism proposals.
Peter Lalor and his followers at the Eureka Stockade were charged with sedition and the editor of the Ballarat Times was found guilty of sedition for praising the revolt and spent three months in prison.
Sedition charges were even laid in Queensland against anti-Vietnam War demonstrators in the 1960s.
www.theage.com.au /news/general/sedition-our-cross-to-bear/2005/11/04/1130823401332.html?oneclick=true   (1018 words)

  
 Alien and Sedition Acts, Lesson Plans, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson
The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798 challenged the Bill of Rights, but ultimately led to a new American definition of freedom of speech and the press.
The U.S. Sedition Act first outlawed conspiracies "to oppose any measure or measures of the government." Going further, the act made it illegal for anyone to express "any false, scandalous and malicious writing" against Congress or the president.
One Republican was convicted of sedition for publishing a pro-Jefferson campaign pamphlet that accused President Adams of appointing corrupt judges and ambassadors.
www.crf-usa.org /terror/alien_sedition_acts.htm   (2092 words)

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