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Topic: Semitic Empire of Sargon of Akkad


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  Akkad - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
Akkad (or Agade) was a city and its region of northern Mesopotamia, situated on the left bank of the Euphrates, between Sippar and Kish (located in present-day Iraq, ca.
Akkad gave its name to the Akkadian language, reflecting use of akkadû ("in the language of Akkad") in the Old Babylonian period to denote the Semitic version of a Sumerian text.
While Sargon is traditionally cited as the first ruler of a combined empire of Akkad and Sumer, more recent work suggests that a Sumerian expansion began under a previous king, Lugal-Zage-Si of Uruk.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/a/k/k/Akkadians.html   (486 words)

  
  Akkad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Akkad (or Agade) was a city and its region of northern Mesopotamia, situated on the left bank of the Euphrates, between Sippar and Kish (located in present-day Iraq, ca.
Akkad gave its name to the Akkadian language, reflecting use of akkadû ("in the language of Akkad") in the Old Babylonian period to denote the Semitic version of a Sumerian text.
While Sargon is traditionally cited as the first ruler of a combined empire of Akkad and Sumer, more recent work suggests that a Sumerian expansion began under a previous king, Lugal-Zage-Si of Uruk.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Akkad   (483 words)

  
 [No title]
The rise of Sargon's empire was doubtless the cause of this extension of the name of Akkad; from henceforward, in the imperial title," Sumer and Akkad " denoted the whole of Babylonia.
Another Semitic ruler of Kis of the same period was Alusarsid (or Urumus) who " subdued Elam and Barahse." But the fame of these early establishers of Semitic supremacy was far eclipsed by that of Sargon of Akkad and his son, Naram-Sin.
The empire was bound together by roads, along which there was a regular postal service; and clay seals, which took the place of stamps, are now in the Louvre bearing the names of Sargon and his son.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /correction/edit?content_id=6145&locale=en   (13373 words)

  
 Akkadian Empire
Another Semitic ruler of Kis of the same period was Alusarsid (or Urumus) who "subdued Elam and Barahs." But the fame of these early establishers of Semitic supremacy was far eclipsed by that of Sargon of Akkad and his son, Nararn-Sin.
Sargon was the son of Itti-Bel, and a legend related how he had been born in concealment and set adrift in an ark of bulrushes on the waters of the Euphrates.
The empire was bound together by roads, along which there was a regular postal service; and clay seals, which took the place of stamps, are now in the Louvre bearing the names of Sargon and his son.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/akkadian_empire   (1421 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Semitic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Semitic is a linguistic term referring to a subdivision of largely Middle Eastern Afro-Asiatic languages, cultures, and ethnicities.
The word "Semitic" is an adjective derived from the Greek Σημ (Sēm), of Shem, one of the three sons of Noah in the Bible (Genesis 5.32, 6.10, 10.21); the noun form referring to a person is Semite.
Semitic languages today are also spoken in Malta (where an Italian-influenced dialect of North African Arabic is spoken) and on the island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean between Yemen and Somalia, where a dying vestige of South Arabian is spoken in the form of Soqotri.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Semitic   (4107 words)

  
 Sargon and the Vanishing Sumerians
A dynasty of Semitic kings came to rule the city of Kish.
It was said that Sargon's mother had abandoned him in a cradle of reeds, that she had placed the cradle on one of Mesopotamia's great rivers and that Sargon had been found and adopted by Sumerians - a story similar to one which would emerge centuries later about a man called Moses.
After the fall of Sargon's empire, war erupted between the Sumerians and Gutians, and the Sumerians exterminated or evicted the Gutieans.
www.fsmitha.com /h1/ch03.htm   (909 words)

  
 info: Akkadian_Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Sargon was the son of La'ibum or Itti-Bel, and one legend related how he had been born in concealment and set adrift in an ark of bulrushes on the waters of the Euphrates.
Sargon's two sons and successors, Rimush and Manishtushu, were not so illustrious, and both were assassinated; but his grandson, Naram-Sin, followed up the earlier successes by marching into Magan, whose king he took captive.
However, the Akkadian Empire was already starting to crumble during Shar-kali-sharri's reign, the son of Naram-Sin, and by the end of Shar-kali-sharri's reign, the Akkadian Empire collapsed outright from the invasion of barbarians of the Zagros known as 'Gutians'.
www.info-assicurazione.com /Akkadian_Empire.html   (1160 words)

  
 Sargon of Akkad -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Sargon (2334 BC - 2279 BC (Click link for more info and facts about short chronology) short chronology) was the first person in recorded history to create an (The domain ruled by an emperor or empress) empire, or multi-ethnic state.
Sargon of Akkad was probably the same person as the first Sargon of (An ancient kingdom in northern Mesopotamia which is in present-day Iraq) Assyria (also known as Sharrukin or Sharru-kin meaning "The true king" in (An ancient branch of the Semitic languages) Akkadian).
Sargon has a dream in which he is favoured by the goddess (Consort of Dumuzi (Tammuz)) Inanna, who drowns Ur-Zababa in a river of blood.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/sa/sargon_of_akkad.htm   (437 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The eighth campaign of Sargon against Urartu in 714 BC is well known from a letter from Sargon to the god Ashur (found in the town of Assur, now in the Louvre) and the bas-reliefs in the palace of Dur-Sharrukin.
Sargon plundered the fertile lands at the southern and western shore of Lake Urmia, felling orchards and burning the harvest.
After the capture of Marduk-apla-iddin, Babylon yielded to Sargon and he was proclaimed king of Babylonia in 710, thus restoring the dual monarchy of Babylonia and Assyria.
stron.frm.pl /wiki.php?title=Sargon_II   (1403 words)

  
 Sargon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Sargon, the king of Agade, the King of the Land, laid waste the city Uruk, destroyed its wall; fought with the men of Uruk, conquered them; fought with Lugalzaggesi, the king of Uruk, took him prisoner and brought him in a neck stock to [Nippur].
Sargon and his successors, of whom Naram-Sin was the most notable, controlled by military force an area which reached from Tell Brak, on the headwaters of the Habur river, down to Elam, where they held the local princes subject.
Sargon, the form in which it has reached us, possibly represents the Akkadian
cornellia.fws1.com /sargon.htm   (858 words)

  
 Sargon of Akkad (c. 2334-2279 B.C.)
Sargon is known almost entirely from the legends and tales that followed his reputation through 2,000 years of cuneiform Mesopotamian history, and not from documents that were written during his lifetime.
During Sargon's rule Akkadian became adapted to the script that previously had been used in the Sumerian language, and the new spirit of calligraphy that is visible upon the clay tablets of this dynasty is also clearly seen on contemporary cylinder seals, with their beautifully arranged and executed scenes of mythology and festive life.
The empire did not collapse totally, for Sargon's successors were able to control their legacy, and later generations thought of him as being perhaps the greatest name in their history.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/sargon.html   (830 words)

  
 Akkad   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Akkad (or Agade) was a city and its region of northern Mesopotamia, (located in present-day Iraq) between Assyria to the northwest and Sumer to the south.
The site of Akkad has not been identified, though texts from as late as the 6th century BCE mention it, and its ruined buildings.
The city of Akkad is mentioned once in the Old Testament (Genesis 10:10).
hallencyclopedia.com /Akkad   (699 words)

  
 Akkadians
Sargon based his empire in the city of Akkad, which became the basis of the name of his people.
This great capital of the largest empire humans had ever seen up until that point later became the city of Babylon, which was the commercial and cultural center of the middle east for almost two thousand years.
   The Akkadians were Semites, that is, they spoke a language drawn from a family of languages called Semitic languages (the term "Semite" is a modern designation taken from the Hebrew Scriptures; Shem was a son of Noah and the nations descended from Shem are the Semites).
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/MESO/AKKAD.HTM   (202 words)

  
 Search Encyclopedia.com
Akkad Akkadă´kăd, ä´käd, ancient region of Mesopotamia, occupying the northern part of later Babylonia.
Sargon of Assyria put down the allies of Merodach-baladan in Syria and Palestine and eventually drove (c.710) the usurper from Babylon.
Semite Semitesĕm´īt, sē´mīt, originally one of a people believed to be descended from Shem, son of Noah.
www.encyclopedia.com /searchpool.asp?target=Sargon+of+Akkad   (522 words)

  
 M104 F2004/King Sargon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
To begin with, Sargon controlled a standing army, which is aptly detailed by Saggs when he says, “Sargon was the first ruler to have a permanent professional army, and spoke of 5400 soldiers who ‘daily took their meals in his presence’” (Nardo 23-24).
Sargon was able to build a centralized government because he chose to focus on political allegiance and military presence rather than cultural assimilation.
Sargon was able to consolidate an empire and he ruled over it for 56 years until the year 2279 B.C. In the midst of consolidation, however, Sargon was faced with sporadic uprising in various cities that required him to reconstitute his influence by smashing these uprisings.
cdli.ucla.edu /staff/englund/m104websubmissions/sargon/sargon.html   (1742 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Akkad   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Akkadian was a language of the Semitic family spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians.
Sargon (2334 BC - 2279 BC short chronology) was the first person in recorded history to create an empire, or multi-ethnic state.
Ishtar is the Akkadian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess `Ashtart.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Akkad   (2364 words)

  
 Akkadian Empire
The driving force of that empire was the Akkadians, so called after the city of Akkad, which Sargon chose for his capital (it has not yet been identified but was presumably located on the Euphrates between Sippar and Kish).
Semites [whether Akkadians or a Semitic language group that had settled before them] may have had a part in the urbanization that took place at the end of the 4th millennium.
Aside from the 34 battles fought in the south, Sargon also tells of conquests in northern Mesopotamia: Mari, Tuttul on the Balikh, where he venerated the god Dagan (Dagon), Ebla (Tall Mardikh in Syria), the "cedar forest" (Amanus or Lebanon), and the "silver mountains"; battles in Elam and the foothills of the Zagros are mentioned.
www.angelfire.com /nt/Gilgamesh/akkadian.html   (1367 words)

  
 sargon of akkad
Sargon of Akkad was probably the same person as the first Sargon of Assyria (also known as Sharrukin or Sharru-kin).
Sargon has a dream in which he is favoured by the goddess Inanna, who drowns Ur-Zababa in a river of blood.
Sargon is the successor to Lugal-zage-si and is the founder of a new dynasty: his son is Rimuc.
www.fact-library.com /sargon_of_akkad.html   (287 words)

  
 Sargon of Agade Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Sargon was born, according to legend, in the city of Saffron on the banks of the Euphrates.
He founded Agade, or Akkad (the site of which is not known), as his new capital and, by defeating the paramount ruler of the Sumerian city-states, became master of all Mesopotamia.
Whether or not Sargon went as far as the Salt Lake (Tuz Lake, or Tuz Gölü), he undoubtedly reached the Mediterranean and could with right claim territories "from the Lower Sea [the Persian Gulf] to the Upper Sea" and from the rising to the setting sun.
www.bookrags.com /biography/sargon-of-agade   (401 words)

  
 Semitic languages
The Semitic languages are a family of languages spoken by more than 250 million people across much of the Middle East, where they originated, and North and East Africa.
Semitic languages were among the earliest to attain a written form, with Akkadian writing beginning in the middle of the third millennium BC.
The term "Semitic" for these languages, after Shem son of Noah, is etymologically a misnomer in some ways (see Semitic), but is nonetheless standard.
www.kiwipedia.com /en/semitic-languages.html   (145 words)

  
 All Empires History Forum: A History of Sargon of Akkad
Sargon the Great (of Akkad) lived 2334-2279 B.C.E. and turned out to be the first great ruler, the first great military tactician and stratetician, and is still amongst the greatest men ever born on this green Earth.
Sargon was left by his mother in a basket floating on a river, and was found a poor Summerian worker who trained the young boy to be the palace gardener.
Sargon's legacy was one of trade and one of forming the standing army which later rulers would use to spread their own havoc.
www.allempires.com /forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=1529&PN=1   (1564 words)

  
 akkad
The Akkadians were a Semitic people that occupied central Mesopotamia, the area that later came to be called Babylonia.
Akkad was the first Semitic empire to attain power.
The city is called Akkad in the Bible, hence the name of the empire and the language.
www.geocities.com /garyweb65/akkad.html   (1029 words)

  
 Essay 5   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
This was the first true form of empire, unlike the partial trade empire of Uruk in the 4th millennium or the shifting and conflicting dynasties of Sumer during the first half of the 3rd millennium, the Akkadian Empire was all-encompassing.
Nevertheless, rebellions internal rebellions were often and when Sargon died around 2279 BCE his shaky empire was handed over to his son, Rimush (12, p.97).
Who held far-flung expeditions to expand the empire in Anshan and Sherihum, Susa east in Iran, and north with the conquests of Ashur and Nineveh (this is proven by the fact that all these cities host statues of him)(12, p.97-98).
www.usc.edu /dept/LAS/religion/arcproj/war/EssayFive.html   (2008 words)

  
 Ancient Akkad in Mesopotamia (NorthEast Iraq)
Akkad is an ancient region of Mesopotamia occupying the northern part of what was later called Babylonian.
Akkad flourished after Sargon began circa 2334 BC to spread wide his conquests which ranged from his capital Agade (never found) to the Mediterranean shores.
Sargon appointed one of his daughters priestess of the moon god in Ur.
ancientneareast.tripod.com /Akkad.html   (328 words)

  
 Akkad and the Akkadians of Mesopotamia (Ancient Akkad)
The Akkadians were Semites, that is, they spoke a language drawn from a family of languages called Semitic languages (the term "Semite" is a modern designation taken from the Hebrew Scriptures; Shem was a son of Noah and the nations descended from Shem are the Semites).
Akkad from 2350 to 2000 BC There are several reasons for taking the year 2350 as a turning point in the history of Mesopotamia.
The original inscriptions of the kings of Akkad that have come down to posterity are brief, and their geographic distribution generally is more informative than is their content.
iraq.iraq.ir /history/akkadians.htm   (2241 words)

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