Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Semitic languages


Related Topics

In the News (Thu 19 Oct 17)

  
  Proto-Semitic Language and Culture. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. 2000
The Appendix of Semitic Roots (Appendix II) that follows this essay is designed to allow the reader to trace English words derived from Semitic languages back to their fundamental components in Proto-Semitic, the parent language of all ancient and modern Semitic languages.
Central Semitic is further subdivided into the South Arabian inscriptional languages; classical, medieval, and modern forms of Arabic; and the Northwest Semitic languages, which include Hebrew and Aramaic.
A distinctive characteristic of the Semitic languages is the formation of words by the combination of a “root” of consonants in a fixed order, usually three, and a “pattern” of vowels and, sometimes, affixes before and after the root.
www.bartleby.com /61/10.html   (3655 words)

  
 History of the Arabic
Semitic languages have a recorded history going back thousands of years, one of the most extensive continuous archives of documents belonging to any human language group.
While the origins of the Semitic language family are currently in dispute among scholars, there is agreement that they flourished in the Mediterranean Basin area, especially in the Tigris-Euphrates river basin and in the coastal areas of the Levant.
The Semitic language family is a descendant of proto-Semitic, an ancient language that was exclusively spoken and has no written record.
www.arabic-language.org /arabic/history.asp   (858 words)

  
  Semitic Languages Branch of the Afro-Asiatic Language Family
As the language of the Qur'an and as a lingua franca of the region, it is widely studied in the Moslem world.
Akkadian is an extinct Semitic language that was spoken in Mesopotamia from the 3rd to the 1st millennium BC.
It was influenced by the surrounding Berber languages.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/august/SemiticLanguages.html   (1238 words)

  
  Semitic Languages - MSN Encarta
Semitic Languages, one of the seven subfamilies or branches of the Afro-Asiatic or Hamito-Semitic language family.
Of the Semitic languages, Arabic was carried beyond its original home in the Arab Peninsula throughout the Arab Empire and is spoken across North Africa to the Atlantic coast, and Arabic and Hebrew are used by Muslims and Jews in other parts of the world.
The other Semitic languages are centred in a region bounded on the west by Ethiopia and on the north by Syria and extending south-east through Iraq and the Arab Peninsula, with some “islands” of Semitic speech farther east in Iran.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761569639/Semitic_Languages.html   (682 words)

  
  Semitic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As language studies are interwoven with cultural studies, the term also came to describe the extended cultures and ethnicities, as well as the history of these varied peoples as associated by close geographic and linguistic distribution.
Wildly successful as second languages far beyond their numbers of contemporary first-language speakers, a few Semitic languages today are the base of the sacred literature of some of the world's great religions, including Islam (Arabic), Judaism (Hebrew and Aramaic), and Orthodox Christianity (Aramaic and Ge'ez).
Semitic languages today are also spoken in Malta (where an Italian-influenced dialect of North African Arabic is spoken) and on the island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean between Yemen and Somalia, where a dying vestige of South Arabian is spoken in the form of Soqotri.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Semitic   (1264 words)

  
 Semitic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Semitic languages were among the earliest to attain a written form, with Akkadian writing beginning in the middle of the third millennium BC.
Semitic daughter languages spread outwards from its heartland in the Arabian Peninsula and the southern Levant.
All Semitic languages exhibit a unique pattern of stems consisting of "triliteral" or consonantal roots (normally consisting of three consonants), from which nouns, adjectives, and verbs are formed by inserting vowels with, potentially, prefixes, suffixes, or infixes (consonants inserted within the original root).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Semitic_languages   (2281 words)

  
 Semitic Languages - ninemsn Encarta
Semitic Languages, one of the seven subfamilies or branches of the Afro-Asiatic or Hamito-Semitic language family.
Of the Semitic languages, Arabic was carried beyond its original home in the Arab Peninsula throughout the Arab Empire and is spoken across North Africa to the Atlantic coast, and Arabic and Hebrew are used by Muslims and Jews in other parts of the world.
The other Semitic languages are centred in a region bounded on the west by Ethiopia and on the north by Syria and extending south-east through Iraq and the Arab Peninsula, with some “islands” of Semitic speech farther east in Iran.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761569639/Semitic_Languages.html   (682 words)

  
 Semitic Languages - LoveToKnow 1911
After scholars had given up the notion (which, however, was not the fruit of scientific research) that all Semitic languages, and indeed all the languages in the world, were descendants of Hebrew or of Aramaic, it was long the fashion to maintain that Arabic bore a close resemblance to the primitive Semitic language.
And, though it is said, not without reason, that the Semites possess but little talent for political and military organization on a large scale, yet we have in the Phoenicians, especially the Carthaginians, in Hamilcar and in Hannibal, a proof that under altered conditions the Semites are not incapable of distinguishing themselves in these domains.
This language lived on, in a sense, through the whole of the middle ages, owing chiefly to the fact that it was intended for educated persons in general and not only for the learned, whereas the poetical schools strove to preserve exactly the grammar and the lexicon of the long extinct language of the Bedouins.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Semitic_Languages   (18262 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - SEMITIC LANGUAGES:   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Semitic languages betray their relationship one to another not only by similarity of articulation and grammatical foundation, but by identity of roots and word-forms; while the Hamitic languages reveal their kinship merely by a similarity in morphology and of the forms of their roots, less often in the material of the roots (comp.
It is characteristic of all the Semitic languages that the peculiarities of the gutturals, the weakness of "w" and "y," and the tendency of a vowelless "n" to assimilate with the following letter, create "weak" or irregular verbs and cause anomalous noun-forms.
The chief distinguishing characteristic of the Canaanitish languages is the construction known as "waw consecutive," in which a peculiarly vocalized conjunction connecting two verbs in a narrative enables a discourse begun in the imperfect state to be continued in the perfect, and vice versa.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=466&letter=S   (3938 words)

  
 Semitic Languages (and the Phoenician language)
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these many Middle Easter countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
Ancient languages spoken by non-Arab population of these countries continue to survive in the dialects/languages of everyday life and the roots of the older languages of the Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Assyrian, Coptic...etc. are still evident.
It diverged from the South Arabian languages around the beginning of the Christian era, reaching its greatest extension in the 4th century AD, when it was spoken especially in the kingdom of Aksum on either side of the present-day border of Ethiopia and Eritrea.
phoenicia.org /semlang.html   (2749 words)

  
 Semitic languages
Language group that includes the languages Arabic, Hebrew in the Middle East region.
Semitic languages are characterized by roots of 3 consonants, from which a large body of verbs and nouns can be derived.
Semitic writings are divided into 3 groups: The cuneiform signs of Assyria and Babylonia, and secondly the alphabet of the North Semitic.
lexicorient.com /e.o/semit_l.htm   (164 words)

  
 Behind the Name: Languages Referenced by this Site
A Semitic language that was spoken in the ancient kingdom of Mesopotamia.
The Semitic language that was formerly spoken in Ethiopia.
The Gaelic language of the Celts of Ireland.
surnames.behindthename.com /languages.php   (1157 words)

  
 SEMITIC LANGUAGES - Online Information article about SEMITIC LANGUAGES
The question which of the known Semitic dialects most resembles the primitive Semitic language is less important than one might at first suppose, since the question is one not of absolute but only of relative priority.
Only when a Semitic language has been strongly influenced not only in vocabulary but also in grammar by some non-Semitic speech, as is the case with Amharic, can such a doubt be for a moment entertained.
The Arabs are also supposed to display the Semitic character in its purest form, and their language is, on the whole, nearer the original Semitic than are the languages of the cognate races.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /SCY_SHA/SEMITIC_LANGUAGES.html   (5039 words)

  
 Imperial Ethiopia - Ethiopian Languages
In Ethiopia, this language is Amharic, a Semitic tongue.
Ethiopia's Semitic languages are written in a unique script of two hundred characters which represent syllables and compound sounds rather than individual letters.
In multi-ethnic nations such as Ethiopia, the use of an "official" language is sometimes criticised on the basis of its representing only a certain part of the population, with the minority populations reacting against the dominance of a foreign tongue.
www.imperialethiopia.org /languages.htm   (344 words)

  
 Twins Biblical Tours - Semitic
Semitic is an adjective referring to the peoples who have traditionally spoken Semitic languages or to things pertaining to them.
At the height of the Carthaginian empire, Semitic languages would have been widely spoken all the way along the southern Mediterranean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean as Carthage was originally a Phoenician colony.
In a religious context, the term Semitic can refer to the religions associated with the speakers of these languages: thus Judaism, Christianity and Islam are often described as "Semitic religions," though the term Abrahamic religions is more commonly used today.
www.twinstours.com /semitic.htm   (291 words)

  
 Arabic Languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Languages of the South Semitic group of the Semitic subdivision of the Hamite-Semitic family of languages.
The Arabic languages comprise North Arabic (or simply Arabic), which represents the Southwest branch of the South Semitic tongues, and South Arabic (or Himyaritic), which belongs to the Southeast branch of the South Semitic group; South Arabic differs sufficiently from North Arabic to be considered a separate language.
Ancient South Arabic had its own South Semitic alphabet, the origin of which is still not clear, although it is generally thought to have had the same source as the North Semitic writing.
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/A/Arabic_Languages.html   (612 words)

  
 SEMITIC LANGUAGES,
Of the Semitic languages, Arabic was carried beyond its original home in the Arabian Peninsula and spread throughout the Arabian Empire and is spoken across North Africa to the Atlantic coast, and Arabic and Hebrew are used by Muslims and Jews in other parts of the world.
The other Semitic languages are centered in a region bounded on the west by Ethiopia and on the north by Syria and extending southeast through Iraq and the Arab Peninsula, with some “islands” of Semitic speech farther east in Iran.
The oldest attested Semitic language, with the oldest Semitic literature, Akkadian was spoken in Mesopotamia between about 3000 bc and 600–400 bc and used as a literary language until the 1st century ad.
www.history.com /encyclopedia/article.jsp?link=FWNE.fw..se079700.a   (944 words)

  
 biblical, hebrew, modern, ancient, aramaic, semitic
The Holy Name and His Torah were revealed to the Children of Israel in their Language, which was Hebrew, akin to Akkadian, Aramaic, Arabic and Geez.
Our language section holds a large selection of books and audio that will assist you to learn and and master the Ancient Semitic languages of The Bible, including Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic.
Lectures on the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages
www.holynameresources.com /page/846874   (363 words)

  
 Codicil
If a character is in conversation with someone who speaks a language in the same language family as one the PC is proficient in, but not the exact language of the PC, conversation is possible with a successful Intelligence check by the PC (DC 13).
The most glaring inaccuracy is the classification of “Canaanite”; languages as a family distinct from the Semitic languages.
Languages grouped in table 2 in the “Isolates” column are languages featured in Testament that are not closely related to other Testament languages and should not be eligible for cross-conversation as described in the Testament rule quoted above.
www.heardworld.com /codicil/play/languages.htm   (1038 words)

  
 Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Students interested primarily in the ancient world are encouraged to study the later languages and literatures as well, and students of the later period may choose to study the older languages.
Language courses above the 500 level may be repeated, provided that their contents have changed in accord with the needs and progress of the students.
"The Language of the Samaria Papyri," Maarav 5-6 (1990) 169-87.
arts-sciences.cua.edu /semitics   (2656 words)

  
 Sembase
Geographically, the Semitic languages were spoken in the Middle East (the Fertile Crescent, Mesopotamia and the Arabian Peninsula).
Attempts even to identify the language of a short inscription may depend on where it was found, and the style of the script, as much as the linguistic content, if the text does not happen to contain a clear identifying trait.
In any case, the "age" of a language is not the same as the "age" of the traits that may have persisted in it.
www.sembase.org   (1908 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - allRefer Reference - Hamito-Semitic languages (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
The most satisfactory explanation is that the Hamitic and Semitic groups, despite their divergences, are subfamilies of a single Hamito-Semitic linguistic family, as evidenced by their marked grammatical, lexical, and phonological resemblances.
Another theory holds that the Hamito-Semitic, or Afroasiatic, language family came into being in Africa, for only in Africa are all its members found, aside from some Semitic languages encountered in W Asia.
The existence of the Semitic languages in W Asia is explained by assuming that the Semites of Africa migrated from E Africa to W Asia in very ancient times.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/H/HamitoSe.html   (385 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.