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Topic: Septennial Act


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  Septennial Act 1715 information - Search.com
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of England to 1600
The Septennial Act 1715 was an Act of the Parliament of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1715, to increase the maximum length of a Parliament (and hence between general elections) from 3 years to 7 years.
The Act was amended in 1911 by the Parliament Act 1911 to change the limit to five years, and then again during the Second World War to extend the Parliament elected in the 1935 general election until the European war had ended in 1945.
www.search.com /reference/Septennial_Act_1715?redir=1   (309 words)

  
  Parliament Act -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The first Act, the Parliament Act 1911, limited the powers of the (The upper house of the British parliament) House of Lords to block (The lower house of the British parliament) House of Commons legislation, asserting the supremacy of the Commons.
In the end, the amended Parliament Act was never used for the intended purposes in the (The decade from 1940 to 1949) 1940s or (The decade from 1950 to 1959) 1950s, possibly because the mere threat of it was enough.
Since the 1949 Act was passed, doubts had been raised by legal (An educator who works at a college or university) academics as to whether the use of the 1911 Act to pass the 1949 Act, amending the 1911 Act itself, was valid.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Pa/Parliament_Act.htm   (1986 words)

  
 Septennial Act - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Septennial Act   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Act 1716 extending the term of a parliament from three to seven years.
It was designed to bolster the Whig government, by postponing the election due 1718 to 1722, but in the long term it led to greater stability but also increased the opportunities for corruption.
The Parliament Act 1911, reduced the life of a parliament five years.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Septennial+Act   (119 words)

  
 Septennial Act 1715 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Septennial Act 1715 was an Act of the Parliament of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1715, to increase the maximum length of a Parliament (and hence between general elections) from 3 years to 7 years.
The ostensible aim of the Act was to reduce election expenses, but it also had the effect of keeping the Whig party, who had won the 1715 general election, in power for longer - and they won the eventual 1722 general election.
The Act was amended in 1911 by the Parliament Act 1911 to change the limit to five years, and then again during the Second World War to extend the Parliament elected in the 1935 general election until the European war had ended in 1945.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Septennial_Act   (246 words)

  
 Parliament Act - The Encyclopedia
The Act was a reaction to the clash between the Liberal government and the House of Lords, culminating in the so-called "People's Budget" of the Chancellor of the Exchequer David Lloyd George in 1909, which proposed the introduction of a land tax based on the ideas of the American tax reformer Henry George.
Since the 1949 Act was passed, doubts had been raised by legal academics as to whether the use of the 1911 Act to pass the 1949 Act, amending the 1911 Act itself, was valid.
After this, the 1949 Act, and the validity of Acts made under it, remained unchallenged until after the Parliament Acts were used to force through the Hunting Act 2004, when the Countryside Alliance raised the question of the validity of the 1949 Act.
www.the-encyclopedia.com /description/Parliament_Act   (2253 words)

  
 Parliament of the United Kingdom - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The Sovereign's role, however, is merely ceremonial; in practice, he or she always acts on the advice of the Prime Minister and other ministers, who are in turn accountable to the two Houses of Parliament.
As the frequent elections were deemed inconvenient, the Septennial Act 1716 extended the maximum duration to seven years, but the Parliament Act 1911 reduced it to five years.
For example, although the Act of Union 1800 states that the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland are to be united "forever," Parliament permitted Southern Ireland to separate into a distinct nation, the Irish Free State, in 1922.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /british_parliament.htm   (6144 words)

  
 Literary Encyclopedia: Septennial Act
The Septennial Act replaced the Triennial Act of 1694 by allowing a Parliament to continue seven years before submitting itself to an election.
The Act reduced the intensity of party political opposition between the Whigs and Tories, and facilitated the Whig supremacy and Robert Walpole’s long domination of Parliament (to 1742).
The Act would remain in effect until the Parliament Act of 1911 reduced the maximum length of a Parliament to five years.
www.litencyc.com /php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1005   (152 words)

  
 Parliament Act biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The first Act, the Parliament Act 1911, cut the powers of the House of Lords to interfere with and retard House of Commons legislation, asserting the supremacy of the Commons.
The act was a reaction to the clash between the Liberal government and the Lords, culminating in the so-called "People's Budget" of the Chancellor of the Exchequer David Lloyd George in 1909, which proposed the introduction of a land tax based on the ideas of the American tax reformer Henry George.
Because the Parliament Acts cannot be used to force through legislation that starts the parliamentary process in the House of Lords they could not have been used to enact laws such as the Civil Partnerships Act 2004.
parliament-act.biography.ms   (1079 words)

  
 Greene, Provincial Governor in the English Colonies of North America. Ch. VIII
Finally, however, the home government interfered: the acts of assembly creating electoral districts were disallowed, and the principle was laid down that the right to elect members ought to be conferred only by the crown, a principle which was carried out in the form of proclamations issued in the king’s name by the governor.
It was believed that such acts tended to weaken the dependence of the colonial legislature upon the governor, and therefore its dependence upon the crown, whose representative he was.
Soon afterwards an act was passed disqualifying sheriffs and ordinary-keepers (who received their licenses from the governor); and three years later the assembly enforced its view by throwing out all sheriffs who had been elected members.
www.dinsdoc.com /greene-2-8.htm   (6112 words)

  
 Parliament Act
This bill was a reaction to the clash between the Liberal government and the Lords, culminating in the so-called "People's Budget" of the Chancellor of the Exchequer David Lloyd George in 1909, which proposed the introduction of a land tax based on the ideas of the American tax reformer Henry George.
In the event, the Parliament Acts were not used to force through the Criminal Justice (Mode of Trial) (No 2) Bill 2000 (which would have given magistrates, not defendants, the choice of where an "either way" offence would be tried).
The Parliament Acts may be invoked in autumn 2004 to pass the Hunting Bill 2004, which would prohibit hare coursing and (subject to some exceptions) all hunting of wild mammals (particularly foxes) with dogs with effect from 2006.
www.askfactmaster.com /Parliament_Act   (964 words)

  
 Erskine May, Chapter VI, pp. 431-48
It was not in nomination boroughs, or in boroughs sold in gross, that bribery had flourished; but it had been the vice of places where a small [432] body of electors,—exercising the same privilege as proprietors,—sold the seats which, by their individual votes, they had the power of conferring.
To obviate this cause of failure, the act of 1841,—inverting the order of proceeding,—required committees to receive evidence generally upon the charges of bribery, without prior investigation of agency; and thus proofs or implications of agency were elicited from the general evidence.
But under the act which authorised these inquiries, voters giving evidence were entitled to claim an indemnity; and it was now successfully contended that they were protected from disfranchisement, as one of the penalties of their offence.
home.freeuk.net /don-aitken/emay431.html   (3555 words)

  
 [No title]
When Bolingbroke in 1733 says that the Septennial Act would have seemed "monstrous" to the Whigs of the Revolution, it is in reaction against the arbitrariness of the growing notion of the omnipotence of parliament.
In contrasting the "monstrous" theory of the Septennial Act with that of the original Whig instigators of the Revolution, Bolingbroke implies that the latter, in the Convention Parliament, were acting not as a body with inherent, arbitrary, sovereign authority; but merely as the voice of the whole people.
The Bill of Rights of 1689, the Triennial Act of 1694, and the Act of Settlement of 1701, which embody nearly the whole of the revolution settlement which obtained the sanction of law, were enacted in the form of ordinary statutes.
www.constitution.org /cmt/mcilw/mcilw.txt   (13902 words)

  
 Lord John Russell's "finality" speech: 20 November 1837
As was customary on the accession of a new monarch, there had been a general election: this was one of a succession of general elections while the Whigs held office.
Thomas Wakley, the MP for Finsbury, had proposed that the Reform Act of 1832 should be amended to include a further extension of the franchise, the introduction of a secret ballot and the repeal of the Septennial Act that required a general election to be held every seven years.
But these are questions upon which I consider Parliament should always feel bound to be alive and attentive to see that the Act suffers no essential injury, and that any errors in the details which might be made in the commencement might be afterwards remedied.
www.victorianweb.org /history/polspeech/final.html   (717 words)

  
 JOHN CARTERET, EARL GRANVILLE - LoveToKnow Article on JOHN CARTERET, EARL GRANVILLE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
He was a friend of the Whig leaders Stanhope and Sunderland, took a share in defeating the Jacobite conspiracy of Bolingbroke on the death of Queen Anne, and supported the passing of the Septennial Act.
His last act was to listen while on his death-bed to the reading of the preliminaries of the treaty of Paris.
He was so weak that the under-secretary, Robert Wood, author of an essay on The Original Genius of Homer, would have postponed the business, but Granville said that it could not prolong his life to neglect his duty, and quoted the speech of Sarpedon from Iliad xii.
98.1911encyclopedia.org /G/GR/GRANVILLE_JOHN_CARTERET_EARL.htm   (1397 words)

  
 QUIZTIME REFERENCE FILES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The Septennial Act of Britain leads to greater electoral corruption — general elections now to be held once every 7 years instead of every 3 (until 1911).
March: Chesterfield's Act passed — royal assent to the bill was given on 22 May 1751 — decision to adopt Gregorian Calendar in 1752.
Gilbert's Act establishes outdoor poor relief — the way of life of the poor beginning to alter due to industrialisation — New factories in rapidly expanding towns required a workforce that would adjust to new work patterns.
forum.hotplugins.com /cgi-bin/showreply.cgi?tpid=52164   (1647 words)

  
 Article 1, The Constitution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
That Act of Congress was in disregard of an early congressional interpretation of the Constitutional clause cited and of the practice which had been sanctioned through the administrations of sixteen Presidents.
Thus a currency act of Congress which, to meet expenses, put a tax on notes of banking associations in circulation was held by the Supreme Court not to be a revenue bill which should have originated in the House of Representatives.
In an opinion written by him (upon fuller study, as he explained) the Act (and one of 1863) was held (1869) beyond the constitutional power of Congress, the chief ground being that the power of Congress can not be implied, and that the acts of Congress could not apply to debts contracted before their passage.
www.theawaregroup.com /article1.htm   (16863 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The two chief items of the ministerial parliamentary programme were the extension of the new Education Act to London and Mr Wyndham's Irish Land Purchase Act, by which the British exchequer should advance the capital for enabling the tenants in Ireland to buy out the landlords.
Another opportunity for making political capital was provided by the publication of the report of the royal commission on the Boer War under Lord Elgin's chairmanship, which horrified the country by its disclosures (August 26) as to the political and military muddling which had gone on, and the want of any efficient system of organization.
The heavy taxation of the war years was still retained, to the disgust especially of the income-tax payers; and new issues arose over the Education Act, labour questions, and the introduction of Chinese labour into South Africa (in 1904), which were successfully used against the government in the constituencies.
www.informationgenius.com /encyclopedia/a/ar/arthur_balfour.html   (4011 words)

  
 Section européenne - History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
By extending the length of Parliaments to 7 years, this Act gave stability to 18th Century political system, but tended to increase electoral corruption.
Catholic Emancipation Act repealed most civil disabilities,included prohibition of sitting in the House.
Prompted by the House of Lords' rejection of the People's Budget, this Act removed the right of veto from the Lords except on bills to extend the life of Parliament.
apella.ac-limoges.fr /lyc-perrier-tulle/europ/history/dochist/text/seconde/housecommons.htm   (664 words)

  
 Law in a Box Newswire
In fact, there are two Parliament Acts, one of 1911 and the other enacted in 1949, although in reality the second only amends the first by reducing the period for which the House of Lords can delay a Bill from two years o one.
As can be seen from the 1911 Act, this provides a statutory means of controlling the power of the Lords to veto measures democratically introduced by the Commons, possibly under what might be called their Manifesto promises.
An Act to make provision with respect to the powers of the House of Lords in relation to those of the House of Commons, and to limit the duration of Parliament.
www.lawinabox.net /lbnewswire10g.html   (1566 words)

  
 Thomas Pelham Holles, Duke of Newcastle (1693-1768
Newcastle was very much in favour of the 1716 Septennial Act because triennial elections were very expensive for him.
The Septennial Act specified that general elections had to take place every seven years instead of every three years as previously.
In October 1762, the Duke of Devonshire was dismissed from his post as Lord Chamberlain because the king believed that he was acting under Newcastle's influence.
www.victorianweb.org /history/pms/newcastle.html   (803 words)

  
 A John Wesley Timeline
The Act of Settlement settles the Royal Succession on the Protestant descendants of Sophia of Hanover.
January 16: The Act of Union unites the kingdoms of England and Scotland and transfers the seat of Scottish Government to London
May 1: The English and Scottish Parliaments are united by an Act of the English Parliament.
dissertation.toph.de /timeline   (1372 words)

  
 Vote Bundle Text (990226-04)
'(1) The Secretary of State shall establish an Independent Commission to investigate the effect of section 1 of this Act on the ability of the House of Lords to scrutinise statutory instruments that are meant to meet a European Community obligation of the United Kingdom.
'(1) The Secretary of State shall establish an Independent Commission to investigate the effect of section 1 of this Act on the consideration by Parliament of any bill that would amend the provisions, or suspend the operation, of the Septennial Act 1715.
'.— Nothing in this Act shall question the right of the House of Lords to scrutinise statutory instruments that are meant to meet a European Community obligation of the United Kingdom.'.
www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk /pa/cm199899/cmbills/034/amend/90226a04.htm   (1062 words)

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