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Topic: Shape note


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  Shaped Notes
But this "sacred harp" shape note method only finds use in singing conventions whose main purpose is to preserve the use of this four shape method.
This method, here called the “eight note” method for lack of a better description, does not introduce into the picture anything new that a vocal student would not already be aware of except the seven shapes themselves, one for each tone of the scale.
Shape notes (and here there is a distinction between Sacred Harp) use a different note head shape for each of the tones of the scale.
www.paperlesshymnal.com /shapnote/shaped.htm   (1402 words)

  
  Handbook of Texas Online: GOSPEL MUSIC
The seven shape note tradition is a nineteenth century evolution from the original fasola, or four note solmization, which was imported from the British Isles and proved popular in colonial America.
The seven shape note tradition in contrast became a dynamic vehicle for gospel songwriters in the late nineteenth century and attracted a growing body of new compositions that demonstrated greater musical sophistication than their fasola cousins.
Seven shape note songbooks exhibit the musical versatility that appealed to young attendees at singing schools and was responsible, therefore, for the growing popularity of the seven shape note tradition.
www.tsha.utexas.edu /handbook/online/articles/view/GG/xbg2.html   (2040 words)

  
 Shape Note Singing from the "Sacred Harp"
Shape note singing is an American folk tradition of singing hymns and gospel songs from books using shaped noteheads to indicate position in the scale.
Shape note singing is a participatory event, not a performance, although visitors are welcome to come and listen.
The high point of shape note singings are singing conventions (Warren Steel tells more about those here) held usually on a weekend with several hours of singing and a pot-luck "dinner on the grounds".
www.freude.com /mnfasola   (691 words)

  
 The Mountain Times
She had heard her grandfather singing shape note songs during her childhood, but she had never heard the diverse beauty of shape note singers’ voices rising together.
Shape note songs are old tunes such as Aunt Rhody, Blue Bells of Scotland, I Were Young Maggie and many other familiar old hymn tunes.
Songbooks using the simplified notion of shape notes, where pitch is indicated by shapes rather than position of musical staff, originated in New England in the early 1700s and peaked in popularity from 1770 to 1800.
www.mountaintimes.com /mtweekly/2003/0313/shape_note.php3   (527 words)

  
 The Middletown Press - Shape note singing empowers music lovers
In shape note singing, the goal is to empower many with the ability to follow written songs, and thus provide communities with their own chorals and choruses.
The singing of shape note music is a participatory event, and while folks are certainly permitted to sit and just listen, they will not be hearing the full impact without participating.
The term "shape note" refers to the actual shapes used to signify the notes and the notes differ from what many imagine when picturing a written score.
www.zwire.com /site/news.cfm?newsid=12729172&BRD=1645&PAG=461&dept_id=10856&rfi=8   (1023 words)

  
 Shape Note Music, Jesse Pearlman Karlsberg
Shape note music is a form of participatory unaccompanied group singing that has been continuously practiced in the United States for over 200 years.
I encountered shape note music through Neely Bruce, a teacher of mine at Wesleyan University, and a major player in the revival of shape note singing in the Northeastern United States.
I have also begun to integrate shape note singing with my practice as a sound artist, producing sound installations featuring recorded shape note music, and organizing participatory singings of original music in the shape note style as a way of telling a story.
shapenote.silversand.org   (286 words)

  
 UVa Music Library: Services
Tunebooks used by the singing school masters were oblong in shape - twice as wide as high, often began with "an easy introduction to the rudiments of music", and contained a variety of secular glees and odes as well as sacred song.
The purpose of the shapes is to simplify learning music reading, apparently successfully so, if judged by the wide adoption of the system by other tunebook compilers.
During the middle decades, interest in shape note sings seemed to narrow geographically to the Deep South, but recent scholarship and spreading grass roots participation in "sings" seems to indicate a resurgence of interest in this uniquely American music [A discussion of the current oral tradition of shape-note singing is in Buell E. Cobb, Jr.
www.lib.virginia.edu /MusicLib/guides/shape.html   (3801 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The shapes of limbs and terminators are the principal source of shape information, but where images overlap the model may be refined by correcting for parallax between surface features and the shape model.
Note: where shape models are not provided, the data are insufficient to constrain the shape beyond a rough ellipsoidal model.
Note on asteroid shapes: shapes of radar-imaged asteroids are by Scott Hudson.
publish.uwo.ca /~pjstooke/plancart.htm   (265 words)

  
 Dolmetsch Online - Music Theory Online - Staffs, Clefs & Pitch Notation
The note we call middle C and which lies in the middle of the alto clef (for clarity, we have shown it in red), lies one line below the five lines of the treble clef and lies one line above the five lines of the bass clef.
The Fasola tradition, which uses shape note notation, is one of unaccompanied singing, that is, without any assistance by instruments.Thus when singing shape-note hymns it is the practice first to "sing the notes", that is, to sing the fa-sol-la syllables corresponding to the shapes in the music before singing the text.
Curwen's note names are actually no more than an anglicised form of Guido d'Arezzo's nomenclature with 'doh' replacing 'ut' and the addition of 'te' for the seventh note of the scale which is otherwise absent because d'Arezzo names only the six notes of the hexachord.
www.dolmetsch.com /musictheory1.htm   (4118 words)

  
 Kaw Valley Shape Note Singing Association
Shape note singing is a very community-oriented, inclusive form of singing.
Traditionally the first time through a song, we "sing the shapes", singing the fa, sol, la, and mi syllables that go with the four shapes of notes (triangle, oval, rectangle, and diamond) printed in shape note music.
It starts with one person giving pitching the tune, since shape note tunes are pitched wherever convenient for the range of those present at a sing.
www.kansasfolk.org /shapenote   (638 words)

  
 Shape Software
Note that you must have a software driver for your particular graphics card - nVidia supplies these for their cards, and drivers for other cards may be supplied by the glasses vendors.
SHAPE is a program for drawing the external morphology (faces) of crystals and quasi-crystals, and also for drawing sections of crystals.
SHAPE comes with an auxilliary program for generating the Cartesian symmetry matrices for any point symmetry group - the matrices for pentagonal and icosahedral groups are provided already.
www.shapesoftware.com   (2183 words)

  
 Ishmael on Shape Notes
Shape-note tunebooks, of which the Original Sacred Harp is a later example, are a development of the New England singing schools and their use of the fa-sol-la (hence Fasola) solmization to teach part-music to otherwise musically untrained folk.
By reading the shapes one need not be too concerned about the sharps and flats in the key signature and how to decipher where the half and whole steps lie on the staff.
It is traditional, and still practiced, that people who gather together to sing this music first "sing the notes", that is, singing the fa-sol-la syllables from the notation, which sets the tune in memory for then singing it complete with the words.
www.mit.edu /people/ijs/shapenote.html   (578 words)

  
 [No title]
This code uses the shapes developed by Joseph Funk for his _Harmonia Sacra_, even though the Aiken system is more widely employed, because the Funk shapes are easier to program: the note heads in the other systems do not all attach to their stems at the same point.
However, the user must supply that information when there are additional notes on the stem (in a shape note context these represent alternatives for the voice): \stemuptrue\zq{h}\qu{e} \stemupfalse\zh{e}\hl{l} * Whole notes, too, can now appear differently depending on whether they occur at the top or at the bottom of the staff.
Note that if octaviation is used at all within that staff within that \notes...
mirrors.ibiblio.org /pub/mirrors/CTAN/support/snote/snreadme.txt   (607 words)

  
 Sacred Harp, Lexington KY
Shape note is an early American form of notation for untrained church choirs.
Each note is written not only on ordinary staff lines (for those who can read them) but also with a shape that indicates its position in the scale.
If you are interested in shape note, you should certainly visit the fasola home page and a compilation of shape-note resources.
www.cs.uky.edu /~raphael/fasola.html   (1207 words)

  
 Shape Note Singing
Music, therefore, was rendered a capella and a system of “shape notes” was developed to make it easier for people to sing according to a uniform standard.
Shape note tune books appeared, singing schools sprang up with some organized with the song books in mind.
The real story of shape note singing is not in the details of how it is done, the source of the tunes, the dates that the tunes were written, or even of the organizers.
www.nchgs.org /traditions/sharpnote   (1078 words)

  
 Shapenote
While the circles were slowly walking and droning their note, the group of seven singers in the center sang.
The music written in these books is comprised of four different shaped note heads, which indicate their position in the musical scale.
Shape note singing remained only in rural areas of Georgia and Alabama until the 1930s when it began to spread into the northern and the Midwestern United States.
www.greenlightwrite.com /shapenote.htm   (1352 words)

  
 KnittingHelp.com :: An Online Guide to Knitting Techniques from Simple to Advanced
The four shapes are used to represent the 7 notes in an octave.
Before singing the lyrics of a song, the group literally "sings the shapes," singing the names of the shaped notes, as if they were lyrics to the tune.
You learn the names of the notes, which are fun to sing like the lyrics, and you don't really pay much attention to them, until, some time later, someone leads a song you've never sung before, and you realize you know what many of those fa, so, la, mi combinations are supposed to sound like.
www.knittinghelp.com /content/personal/shape-note/index.php   (939 words)

  
 Shape Note Singing
Music, therefore, was rendered a capella and a system of “shape notes” was developed to make it easier for people to sing according to a uniform standard.
Shape note tune books appeared, singing schools sprang up with some organized with the song books in mind.
The real story of shape note singing is not in the details of how it is done, the source of the tunes, the dates that the tunes were written, or even of the organizers.
nchgs.org /traditions/sharpnote   (1078 words)

  
 FolkStreams » Sweet Is the Day » Shape Note Singing
The term "shape notes" commonly refers to the system of music notation introduced during the nineteenth century as an aid in vocal music instruction.
In their heyday, shape notes dominated the American music publishing industry and were familiar among the public.
The main function of the shapes was to easily convey the relationship of the printed notes to the degrees of the diatonic scale.
www.folkstreams.net /context,58   (521 words)

  
 Solfege, Solfeggio, Fasola or Shape Note Singing Introduction at Vocalist
Solfege, Solfeggio, Sol-fa, Fasola, Shape Note Singing and sight singing are all terms used to describe a system that was developed to provide the singer with a visual clue for which note to sing.
This is achieved either with hand signals or sheet music which uses notes that instead of being oval in shape, are designated with shapes like triangle, square, diamond, etc., or a combination of both hand signals and written music.
Shape note singing has undergone many changes with each adoptive country adapting symbols and systems to suit their preferred methods of teaching and vocal styles.
www.vocalist.org.uk /solfege.html   (1579 words)

  
 Gregorio - Use of GregorioXML
The convention is to say that the note of the key is in the second octave.
There are two possible signs on the right of the note: punctum mora is a dot after the note, and augmentum duplex is composed of two dots aligned vertically, after the notes.
The pes quadratum is a new shape invented by a monk of the abbey Sainte-Madeleine du Barroux to determine precisely the translation of the podatus from ancient notation to square notation.
home.gna.org /gregorio/gregorioxml/details   (2636 words)

  
 [No title]
In the 1790's a new method of printing the music was invented which printed a different shape of note head for each of the four syllables.
During the first half of the 1800's shape note singing schools became popular in the frontier regions, especially the south and central states.
They utilized the shape note singing school method, publishing their books taller than wide, and their hymns on only two staffs (the older shape note books had been oblong with three parts written on three staffs).
shapenote.tripod.com /history.html   (550 words)

  
 Mountain Grown Music - Shape Note Singing
The method of reading music with shaped notes flourished in the United States at a time when a young nation yearned to become musically literate.
But according to Linda Greene, local shaped note singer and secretary with the World Methodist Council at Lake Junaluska, many publishing companies tried set their own spin on the history of shaped-note singing through their own published books.
In Walker's songbook, the notes and their shapes are as follows: Doe is a trapezoid, ray is a crescent moon, mee is a diamond, faw is a right triangle, sole is an oval, law is a square, see is a triangle tilted on its side and doe is a trapezoid again.
mountaingrownmusic.org /shape-notes.html   (913 words)

  
 Fiddle Tunes at Centrum: Shape Note Singing: A Community Music Tradition
Soul stirring, rafter rattling "shape note music" is one of America's deepest community music traditions, and it's alive and kicking.
Shape note's flagship tunebook "the Sacred Harp" has been in print in the American southland for over 160 years, longer than any book but the Bible.
Here is a nice NPR feature on a shape note gathering, with audio.
www.centrum.org /fiddle/2007/09/shape-note-si-1.html   (266 words)

  
 Mobtown Blues: Shape Note Singing
It's either the Handel Choir of Baltimore or shape note singing, and you just can't stand all the melismas in 'O Thou That Tellest Good Tidings to Zion,' so Sacred Harp it is.
Those familiar with the shape note singing tradition know that a disproportionate number of songs in tunebooks like 'The Sacred Harp,' 'The Southern Harmony,' 'The Missouri Harmony,' and so on are named after places, in many cases the birthplaces of the composers.
A number of other shape note hymns take their titles from people's names, as in the case of 'Amanda Ray' (#493 in the 1991 Sacred Harp), which S. Whitt Denson named for a female relative.
mobtownblues.typepad.com /mobtownblues/shape_note_singing/index.html   (5254 words)

  
 Ishmael on Shape Notes
Shape-note tunebooks, of which the Original Sacred Harp is a later example, are a development of the New England singing schools and their use of the fa-sol-la (hence Fasola) solmization to teach part-music to otherwise musically untrained folk.
By reading the shapes one need not be too concerned about the sharps and flats in the key signature and how to decipher where the half and whole steps lie on the staff.
It is traditional, and still practiced, that people who gather together to sing this music first "sing the notes", that is, singing the fa-sol-la syllables from the notation, which sets the tune in memory for then singing it complete with the words.
web.mit.edu /user/i/j/ijs/www/shapenote.html   (578 words)

  
 Ottawa Shape Note Chorus Recordings
The following field recordings of the Ottawa Shape Note Chorus were made on June 16, 2001 at the Carsonby Hall in Ottawa.
As is traditional for shape note singing (see also here) the singers were seated in a square, facing inward, altos across from tenors, and basses across from sopranos.
One note of caution: this method worked well for me, but I don't guarantee this is the best or safest way to suspend these microphones.
www.orange-carb.org /~cmh/SacredHarp/recordings.html   (823 words)

  
 The Sacred Harp recordings - Shape note singing - Fasola music CDs
This album of Sacred Harp ("shape note") singing presents a cross section of a tradition which was born centuries ago in the British Isles, crossed the Atlantic with the early colonists, took on the colors of the eighteenth-century singing school, and, after the Revolution, spread into the remotest parts of the Southeast.
This system, and the Shape Note singing books such as the Sacred Harp (which was originally published in 1844), were ubiquitous, particularly in the South, in the 18th and 19th centuries.
The polyphony of the shape note is characterized by lively chordal movement, and dyadic harmony based on fourths and fifths, often in parallel.
www.singers.com /shapenote.html   (1828 words)

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