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Topic: Shtokavian


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Shtokavian dialect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Shtokavian or Štokavian (Serbo-Croatian: štokavski/штокавски) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system: Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian language.
The Štokavian dialect is spoken in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and the greater part of Croatia.
Also called jekavian šćakavian, it has jekavian prounanciation in the vast majority of local forms and it is spoken by the majority of Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) living in area that include bigger Bosnian cities Sarajevo, Tuzla and Zenica, and by most of Croats and Serbs that live in that area.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Shtokavian   (2737 words)

  
 Kajkavian dialect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The dialect is spoken in the northwestern parts of Croatia, including Zagreb, as well as in a few Croatian language islands in Austria, Hungary and Romania.
The Kajkavian dialect area is bordered on the east and south by Shtokavian dialects roughly along a line that was the former division between Civil Croatia and the Habsburg Military Frontier.
Kajkavian is not only a folk dialect, but has, in the course of history of Croatian language, been the written language (along with the corpus written in Chakavian and Shtokavian).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Kajkavian_dialect   (1165 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Serbo-Croatian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
These have nothing to do with various standard[?] versions, which are all based on the Shtokavian dialect.
The Shtokavian dialect is spoken in Serbia, Bosnia, Montenegro and the greater part of Croatia.
The Eastern or ekavian variant of Shtokavian, spoken in most of Serbia and far Eastern Croatia, renders the Proto-Slavic[?] jat sound as "e".
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/se/Serbo-Croatian_language   (496 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Bunjevci
Shtokavian (Štokavian, štokavski) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian.
The Serbian language is one of the standard versions of the Å tokavian dialect (former standard was known as Serbo-Croatian language).
Shtokavian (Å tokavian, Å¡tokavski) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian, Zlatiborian, and Croatian.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bunjevci   (2932 words)

  
 Edge Translation
Spoken in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Bosnian language is one of the standard versions of the central south Slavic dialect based on the Shtokavian dialect primarily used in the region of Sandzak.
Standard Bosnian, based on the Shtokavian and Ijekavian pronunciation, is the official language, along with Serbian and Croatian, of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
It is based on the western variant of the Shtokavian dialect and uses both Cyrillic and Latin Alphabets, as Bosnians and Croats in Bosnia and Herzegovina prefer the Latin alphabet, while Cyrillic is preferred by Bosnian Serbs.
www.edgetranslation.net /bosnian1.htm   (322 words)

  
 Torlakian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Torlakian is the name used for the Slavic dialects spoken in Southern and Eastern Serbia, Northwest Republic of Macedonia (Kratovo-Kumanovo) and Northwest Bulgaria (Vidin-Bregovo).
Some linguists classified it as the fourth dialect of Serbo-Croatian language (with Shtokavian, Chakavian and Kaykavian) and today as the second Serbian language macro-dialect (with Shtokavian).
Some linguists in Bulgaria (Stoyko Stoykov, Rangel Bozhkov) classify Torlakian as a "Belogradchik-Trn" dialects of Bulgarian language and also claim that Torlakian should be classified outside of shtokavian area.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Torlakian   (1432 words)

  
 Prizren - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
It is the administrative capital of Prizreni District, which has an estimated population of about 178,000 and is located on the slopes of the Šar mountain in the south-western part of the country, close to the Albanian border.
The original Prizren dialect of Serbo-Croatian is an archaic variant of shtokavian - and a member of the Balkan sprachbund.
The city of Prizren has existed for at least a thousand years, becoming the seat of a bishopric under the Byzantine Empire in 1019.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Prizren   (921 words)

  
 Ljudevit Gaj - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It was a big progress in realising the idea of marking the Croatian literature as unique.
The "Novine Horvatske" were printed in Kajkavian dialect until the end of that year, while "Danica" was printed in Shtokavian dialect along with Kajkavian.
In early 1836 the publications' names were changed to Ilirske narodne novine ("The Illyrian People's News") and Danica ilirska ("The Illyrian Morning Star") respectively.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ljudevit_Gaj   (433 words)

  
 Montenegrin language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Montenegrins speak subdialects of Shtokavian dialect of Serbo-Croatian language:
Unlike other shtokavian dialects, the iotation affects sounds [s] and [z] to a much greater extent, yielding /ʃʲ/ or /ç/ for /sj/, and /ʒʲ/ or /ʝ/ for /zj/
Most mainstream politicians and other proponents of Montenegrin language simply state that the issue is chiefly one of self-determination and the people's right to call the language as they want, rather than an attempt to artificially create a new language when there is none.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Montenegrin_language   (1421 words)

  
 Differences in standard Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In general, Shtokavian dialect has four types of accent (short falling, ı̏, short rising ì, long falling î, and long rising, í).
In addition, a distinct characteristics of Bosnian dialects is stress shift to enclitics (e.g.
Most Serbian dialects also preserve the four-accent system, but the unstressed lengths have been shortened or disappeared; accent shifts also survived (although not with all speakers in the same extent).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Differences_in_official_languages_in_Serbia%2C_Croatia_and_Bosnia   (3052 words)

  
 Dalmatian language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Major influences on the language were the Rhaeto-Romance languages, then Venetian as Venice's commercial influence grew.
The Chakavian dialect and Dubrovnik Shtokavian dialect in Croatia, which was spoken outside the cities since the Slavs migrated, gained importance in the cities by the 16th century, and it eventually completely replaced Dalmatian as a day-to-day language.
An analytic trend can be observed in Dalmatian: nouns and adjectives began losing their gender and number inflections, the noun declension disappeared completely and the verb conjugations began to follow the same path; however, the verb kept genders (masculine and feminine) and numbers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dalmatian_language   (1325 words)

  
 Croatian
Shtokavian has three varieties, based on three different present-day pronunciations of the vowels that replaced the Common Slavic long vowel [æ], known as jat'.
Standard Croatian based on the Shtokavian and Ikavian pronunciation, is the official language of Croatia.
It is spoken by 4.8 million people in Croatia in all areas of public and private life.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/december/croatian.html   (1218 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Bosnian language
In linguistics, a diasystem is a term used in structural dialectology, to refer to a single genetic language which has two or more standard forms.
Shtokavian (Štokavian, štokavski/штокавски) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian.
There are very few or no other articles that link to this one.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bosnian-language   (4666 words)

  
 Dalmatian Latin - Language of Illyricum!!! - Message Board - ezboard.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Shtokavian dialect had got its current form 3 or 4 centuries ago.
Foreign influences in coastal Shtokavian dialect come from the same languages as above; in inner Shtokavian dialect those influences came in smaller amount, but there are words that come from Turkish language.
Chakavians mostly live on coastal and island areas, and Shtokavians live in bigger coastal cities,in coastal areas southern from river Cetina and mostly in innerland.
pub18.ezboard.com /fbalkansillyriaforum.showMessage?topicID=333.topic   (6537 words)

  
 Croatia Communicating with Croatians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The structures and vocabularies of Serbian, Croatian and Bosnian are so similar that speakers of any one of them can easily understand one another; consequently, outside of Croatia, the three languages are usually referred to as one, called Serbo-Croat.
roatian also has three regional dialects: Kajkavian, Chakavian and Shtokavian, the last of which is considered standard Croatian.
Many Croatian words contain no vowels; although spellings appear intimidating, each word is spoken as it is written, with every letter pronounced.
www.cp-pc.ca /english/croatia/commun.html   (285 words)

  
 Croatian language xmpg.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Croatian is based on the Shtokavian dialect (with some influence from Chakavian dialect and Kajkavian dialect) and written with the Croatian alphabet.
The modern Croatian standard language is a continuous outgrowth of more than nine hundred years of literature written in a mixture of Croatian Church Slavonic and the vernacular language.
The Shtokavian dialect literature, based almost exclusively on Čakavian original texts of religious provenance (missals, breviaries, prayer books) appeared almost a century later.
croatian.language.en.xmpg.org   (3479 words)

  
 Serbo-Croatian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The written language in Serbia was a local variant of Church Slavonic until the end of the 17th century, when Russian Church Slavonic was adopted and the compromise style of writing known as Slavono-Serbian began to develop.
The modern literary languages are based on the Central dialect, also known as the Shtokavian dialect because the form of the interrogative pronoun “what?” in this dialect is shto (što).
It was used in the writings of Vuk Stefanovic Karadzic (1787–1864), who is also responsible for adapting the Cyrillic alphabet to the sound system of the Serbo-Croatian language.
www.rkp-montreal.org /en/05serbocroatian.html   (218 words)

  
 Konavle - forgery on the origins
The primary expression of this aggressiveness was Vuk Karadzic's theory that all shtokavian speakers are Serbs.
Early Croatian literature was written in each of its three dialects; its modem literary and linguistic standard, however, is based upon shtokavian.
According to this theory, even shtokavian Dubrovnik was supposed to be a Serbian town.
www.hr /darko/etf/konav.html   (2716 words)

  
 Slavonic languages
The literary Serbo-Croatian language was formed in the first half of the 19th century on the basis of the Shtokavian dialects that extend over the greater part of Bosnian, Serbian, Croatian, and Montenegrin territory.
These dialects are called Shtokavian because they use the form što (pronounced in English as shto) for the interrogative pronoun ‘what?'.
They are distinguished from the Chakavian dialects of western Croatia, Istria, the coast of Dalmatia (where a literature in this dialect developed in the 15th century), and some islands in the Adriatic; in those areas ca (pronounced in English as cha) is the form for ‘what?'.
www.rkp-montreal.org /en/05slavoniclanguages.html   (5789 words)

  
 FORUM - Preparing to Print Topic 'SERBIAN LANGUAGE - THEORY'
Standard Serbian language in Serbia is written in Cyrillic, and the use of Latin script is allowed; while in Montenegro both Cyrillic and Latin are used as official alphabets of standard Serbian language.
DIALECT: (in Serbian: dijalekt) Serbian is spoken in the shtokavian dialect (I’ll refer to it as ‘štokavski’ further in the text).
Don't worry, it comes with listening to them speaking...even i have trouble sometimes (as a native speaker) getting at first what people from some of the regions say...especially from the bordering regions, where vocabulary of the language is influenced and mixed, as well as accents.
www.phrasebase.com /forum/read.php?action=print&TID=6517   (802 words)

  
 Bosnian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Although there is no publicly formulatedCroatian policy towards this question, in official Croatian publications (for instance, in Croatian Encyclopaedia issues orUniversity manuals), the language of Bosniaks is invariably referred to as Bosniak.
The language is based on the Western variantof the Shtokavian dialect and uses the Latin alphabet.
The irony of the Bosnian language is that its speakers, Bosnian Muslims or Bosniaks, are, on the level of colloquial idiom,more linguistically homogenous than either Serbs or Croats, but have failed, due to historical reasons, to standardize theirlanguage in the crucial 19th century.
www.therfcc.org /bosnian-language-68882.html   (419 words)

  
 Marko Marulic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
His dialectal idiom was a rather archaic and did not play important role in theprocess of standardization of Croatian language — unlikethe poetic and prose expression of writers from Dubrovnik, Korčula and Hvar like Hanibal Lucić and PetarHektorović.
Even chronology-wise, DžoreDržić and Šiško Menčetić wrote in essentially modern Croatian Shtokavian dialect some 3 decadesbefore him.
Marulić's national eminence is due to happy confluence of some other facts: no one of his contemporaries or predecessorshad achieved fame during his lifetime.
www.therfcc.org /marko-marulic-162243.html   (461 words)

  
 Bosnian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Bosniak language is the prescribed name of the language in Serbian.
The language is based on Western variant of the Shtokavian dialect and the Latin alphabet.
The irony of the Bosnian language is its speakers Bosnian Muslims or Bosniaks are the level of colloquial idiom more linguistically than either Serbs or Croats but have due to historical reasons to standardize their in the crucial 19th century.
www.freeglossary.com /Bosnian_language   (719 words)

  
 Bosnian Information Center - bosnian war
The language learn bosnian is used primarily by Bosniaks in Bosnia and Herzegovina and elsewhere.
It is based on the Western variant of the Shtokavian dialect and uses both the Cyrillic and Latin bosnian foods alphabets.
The name Bosnian language is the commonly accepted bosnian flag name among Bosniak linguists, and the bosnian culture name used by the ISO-639 bosnian war standard.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Official_Languages_A_-_C/Bosnian.html   (835 words)

  
 languagehat.com: "BOSNIAN" IN NOVI PAZAR.
Quite apart from the literary standards, there is a chain of dialects which are similar to each other, though very different from the ones at the opposite end of the chain.
To give an example, my native dialect is the Shtokavian Ikavian, which is spoken in Dalmatia, and some areas of Bosnia and in Hercegovina.
But that is not to say that I would be able to readily understand natives of Zagreb or of Belgrade speaking their local dialects.
www.languagehat.com /archives/001764.php   (2984 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Marko Marulic Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
His dialectal idiom was a rather archaic and did not play important role in the process of standardization of Croatian language — unlike the poetic and prose expression of writers from Dubrovnik, Korčula; and Hvar like Hanibal Lucić and Petar Hektorović.
Even chronology-wise, Džore Držić and Šiško Menčetić wrote in essentially modern Croatian Shtokavian dialect some 3 decades before him.
Marulić's national eminence is due to happy confluence of some other facts: no one of his contemporaries or predecessors had achieved fame during his lifetime.
www.ipedia.com /marko_marulic.html   (529 words)

  
 The IstroRomanians: News - Language of the Month: Istro-Romanian
This was the case with two Romance idioms - the Friulian dialect of Muggia (the last speaker died in 1889) and the Dalmatian dialect of the island of Krk (the last speaker died in 1898).
Three other small languages have survived - the Montenegrin Shtokavian dialect of Peroj, the Istriot language, and finally, the subject of this article, Istro-Romanian.
By Istro-Romanian linguists mean a set of Romance vernaculars spoken in Eastern Istria (Croatia), undoubtedly closely related to Romanian.
www.istro-romanian.net /articles/art051001.html   (1214 words)

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