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Topic: Sickle cell anaemia


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  Sickle-cell disease - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sickle cell disease is a general term for a group of related genetic disorders caused by sickle hemoglobin (Hgb S).
Sickle cell anemia is caused by a mutation in the β-globin chain of hemoglobin, replacing glutamic acid with less polar valine at the sixth position of the β chain.
The allele responsible for sickle cell anaemia is autosomal recessive.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sickle_cell_anaemia   (2295 words)

  
 Sickle cell anaemia - Medical Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease which causes the red blood cells of a sufferer to be shaped like sickles, instead of the normal rounded shape.
The first approved drug for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia, hydroxyurea, was shown to decrease the number and severeness of attacks in a study in 1995 and shown to increase survival time in a study in 2003.
The gene allele responsible for sickle cell anaemia is incompletely recessive.
www.nursingstudy.com /encyclopedia/Sickle_cell_anaemia.html   (780 words)

  
 Sickle cell anaemia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease which causes the red blood cell s of a sufferer to be shaped like sickle s, instead of the normal rounded shape.
Sickle cell anaemia is caused by a mutation in the β-globin chain of hemoglobin that replaces valine with glutamic acid at the sixth amino acid position.
The allele responsible for sickle cell anaemia is incompletely recessive.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Sickle_cell_anaemia.html   (1515 words)

  
 Sickle Cell Anemia
Sickle cell anemia occurs when a person inherits two abnormal genes (one from each parent) that cause their red blood cells to change shape.
Sickle cell anemia is a blood disorder that affects hemoglobin (pronounced: hee-muh-glow-bin), a protein found in red blood cells that helps carry oxygen throughout the body.
Sickle cell anemia is not contagious, so you can't catch it from someone else or pass it to another person like a cold or other infection.
kidshealth.org /teen/diseases_conditions/blood/sickle_cell_anemia.html   (618 words)

  
 MRC Research Updates. The sickling disease.Introduction.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell anaemia is a disease of malarial tropical areas: 1 - 4% of all babies born in East and West Africa suffer from the disease.
A common cause of death in sickle cell anaemia sufferers of all ages is severe infection, babies and children being particularly prone to infection by Pneumococcus bacteria.
Sickle cell anaemia carries a very high mortality in the first two years of life in regions such as rural East and West Africa, where health care is minimal.
www.schoolscience.co.uk /content/5/biology/mrc/7/page1.html   (412 words)

  
 Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers: Resources Library: Sickle Cell Anaemia
Sickle Cell Anaemia is a disorder of the haemoglobin.
Sickle Cell Anaemia is not contagious or infectious.
Sickle Cell Trait is not to be confused with Sickle Cell Anaemia.
www.usdaw.org.uk /equality/resource_library/1049090495_16782_34.html   (912 words)

  
 Sickle Cell Anaemia
Sickle cell anaemia is an inherited disease of the red blood cells.
Sickle cell anaemia is a "multisystem" problem, meaning that it can affect several different systems in the body.
Sickle cell dominant patients have a much poorer prognosis and survival into adulthood is more unusual.
www.targetwoman.com /athene/sickle   (549 words)

  
 Sickle cell anaemia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a common genetic disease which causes the red blood cells of a sufferer to be shaped sickles instead of the normal rounded shape.
Vasoocclusive crises are caused by sickled red cells that obstruct capillaries and restrict bloodflow an organ resulting in ischemia pain and organ damage.
The first approved drug for the treatment sickle cell anaemia hydroxyurea was shown to the number and severeness of attacks in study in 1995 and shown to increase survival time a study in 2003.
www.freeglossary.com /Sickle-cell_anaemia   (1294 words)

  
 24Dr.com Reference Library Congenital conditions - Sickle Cell Anaemia
But when oxygen is released by the red blood cells in people with sickle cell disease, the cells become distorted, forming a rigid banana or sickle shape that can clog blood vessels.
Sickle cells tend to become trapped and destroyed in the liver and in the spleen.
Sickle beta thalassemia is a less common form of sickle cell disease.
www.24dr.com /reference/library/congenital/sickle_cell/intro.htm   (310 words)

  
 Malaria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
To avoid this fate, the parasite produces certain surface proteins which infected blood cells present on their cell surface, causing the blood cells to stick to the walls of blood vessels.
The stickiness of the red blood cells is particularly pronounced in Plasmodium falciparum malaria and this is the main factor giving rise to hemorrhagic complications of malaria.
Carriers of the sickle cell anemia gene are protected against malaria because of their particular hemoglobin mutation; this explains why sickle cell anemia is particularly common among people of African origin.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Malaria   (3364 words)

  
 Thalassaemia, haemolytic & sickle cell anaemia - symptoms & treatment
Anaemia is a condition in which the blood cannot carry enough oxygen, either because there is a low number of red blood cells or because each red blood cell is able to carry less oxygen than normal.
Red blood cells are made by the body in the bone marrow, and live for around four months before they are destroyed and replaced, as part of a normal renewal process.
Anaemia is a condition in which the blood cannot carry enough oxygen to meet the needs of the body.
hcd2.bupa.co.uk /fact_sheets/html/anaemia.html   (859 words)

  
 Sickle Cell Anaemia | Vhi Healthcare
Sickle cell anaemia is a disease of red blood cells that is passed from parent to child.
Scientists think the sickle cell gene is more common in tropical Africa and Asia because the trait protects people from malaria, a disease caused by a parasite that lives in red blood cells and has infected people in those areas since ancient times.
In a child with sickle cell anaemia, however, the risk of a life-threatening infection is so high that you should call a doctor as soon as your child shows any symptoms of illness.
www2.vhihealthe.com /article/primer/100114783   (1488 words)

  
 Sickle Cell Anaemia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell is a disease that is inherited and may occur as a trait (you carry one mutated gene from one of your parents) or as the disease (you carry two mutated genes, one from each of your parents).
The sickle cell abnormality is found predominantly in people of African ancestry but may also be found in those who can trace their roots to the Mediterranean area, South and Central America, the Middle East, India, and the Caribbean.
Signs of sickle cell crisis include fever, mild jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes), chest pain and shortness of breath.
www.labtestsonline.org.uk /understanding/conditions/sickle.html   (615 words)

  
 MRC Research Updates. The sickling disease.Managing sickle cell anaemia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Once babies with sickle cell anaemia have been identified by neonatal screening they are prescribed daily doses of penicillin which prevent death from infection during early childhood.
A controversial form of treatment for a patient with sickle cell anaemia is bone marrow transplantation.
However, sickle cell anaemia is extremely variable in severity and it is impossible to predict the course the disease will take.
www.schoolscience.co.uk /content/5/biology/mrc/7/page6.html   (273 words)

  
 BBC - Health - Conditions - Sickle cell anaemia
Sickle cell anaemia is an inherited genetic condition in which there is an abnormality in haemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein found in red blood cells.
Sickle cell anaemia is an autosomal recessive genetic condition.
There is no cure for sickle cell anaemia, but the frequency and severity of crises and their complications can be reduced by prompt recognition and treatment.
www.bbc.co.uk /health/conditions/sicklecell1.shtml   (544 words)

  
 2as1.Net Article: Sickle Cell Anaemia
Sickle Cell Disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects mainly people of African Caribbean, Eastern Mediterranean, and Middle Eastern and Asian descent.
It is called 'sickle' cell because of the crescent shape of the affected red blood cells.
If one parent has sickle cell trait Haemoglobin AS (HbAS) and the other has sickle cell anaemia, Haemoglobin SS (HbSS) there is a one in two (50%) chance that any given child will get sickle cell trait and a one in two chance that any given child will get sickle cell anaemia.
www.2as1.net /articles/article.asp?id=88   (1362 words)

  
 eMedicine - Anemia, Sickle Cell : Article by Ali Taher, MD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Pathophysiology: Sickle cell anemia is an autosomal recessive genetic disease that results from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta-globin gene, leading to production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS).
Sickle pulmonary disease is due to a chronic hypoxic state, recurrent infarctions, and infections.
Patients who are pregnant and have sickle cell disease are at increased risk for crisis, toxemia, pyelonephritis, thrombophlebitis, and spontaneous abortion compared to the general population.
www.emedicine.com /emerg/topic26.htm   (4310 words)

  
 Inclusive Technology - Sickle Cell
Sickle Cell Disorder (SCD) is the name for several related but different inherited disorders associated with the sickling of the red blood cell.
Sickle cell disorder alters the shape of the red blood cells from their usual round appearance to something which resembles a sickle, or half moon.
Sickle cell anaemia is usually the most severe type of sickle cell disorder where the majority of the haemoglobin inherited is sickle.
www.inclusive.co.uk /support/sicklec.shtml   (428 words)

  
 Sickle Cell - Health and Medical Information produced by doctors - MedicineNet.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell anemia (sickle cell disease) is a disorder of the blood caused by an inherited abnormal hemoglobin (an oxygen-carrying protein within the red blood cells).
Sickle cell anemia is inherited as an autosomal (meaning that the gene is not linked to a sex chromosome) recessive condition whereas sickle cell trait is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
Sickle cell trait is present in some two million fls in the United States (8% of the U.S. fl population at birth).
www.medicinenet.com /sickle_cell/article.htm   (577 words)

  
 Inheritance of Sickle Cell Anaemia
Sickle Cell Anaemia is called a recessive condition because you must have two copies of the sickle haemoglobin gene to have the disorder.
If one parent has sickle cell trait (HbAS) and the other has sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) there is a one in two (50%) chance that any given child will get sickle cell trait and a one in two chance that any given child will get sickle cell anaemia.
For example, if there is a one in four chance that you will have a baby with sickle cell anaemia, and if you go on to have a number of children, it is still possible that all your children could have sickle cell anaemia or that none will have sickle cell anaemia.
www.sicklecellsociety.org /education/inherit.htm   (972 words)

  
 Genes and You - Genetic Disorders - Sickle Cell Anaemia
Sickle Cell Anaemia (pronounced er-nee-meeya) is an inherited blood disorder in which there is a defect in the structure of haemoglobin.
The pattern of inheritance for Sickle Cell Anaemia is autosomal recessive.
The outlook for sickle cell patients regarding quality and length of life has been much improved as the condition becomes better understood, active management is introduced and parents are informed.
www.wordsandpeople.com /gig/genesandyou_sicklecellanaemia.htm   (922 words)

  
 What is Sickle Cell Anaemia?
This means that this person has enough normal haemoglobin in their red blood cells to keep the cells flexible and they don't have the symptoms of the sickle cell disorders.
When a person is found to have a sickle cell disorder it is important that all members of the family be tested.
Sickle Cell Disorder is a condition which is inherited from both parents.
myweb.tiscali.co.uk /musicbook/Sickle.htm   (853 words)

  
 Open Directory - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Blood Disorders: Sickle Cell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The American Sickle Cell Anemia Association - A non-profit organisation based in Cleveland Ohio whose objectives are to raise awareness of the condition.
Sickle Cell Disease: Information for Health Professionals - Basic facts, symptoms, how to recognise a crisis, diagnosis and management are some of the topics covered.
The Sickle Cell Foundation of Alberta - Educates the public about sickle cell disease and provides support for carriers of the trait and their families.
dmoz.org /Health/Conditions_and_Diseases/Blood_Disorders/Sickle_Cell   (506 words)

  
 The pulmonary physician in critical care * Illustrative case 6: Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell anaemia -- Mak and ...
Causes and outcomes of the acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease.
Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 is involved in mediating hypoxia-induced sickle red blood cell adherence to endothelium: potential role in sickle cell disease.
Hematologic responses of patients with sickle cell disease to treament with hydroxyurea.
thorax.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/58/8/726   (2329 words)

  
 Sickle cell anaemia 4-651   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Sickle cell disease is one of the more common abnormalities of haemoglobin.
The combination of Sickle and haemoglobin C, or B, thalassaemia have a higher risk of bone disease.
Although the stress of haematopoesis and variation in the sequestration of the abnormal cells in the spleen can produce clinical crises, the effect on the appearance of the skeleton is largely the result of vascular occlusion by the accumulation of red cells, which are stiffer and also abnormal in shape.
myweb.lsbu.ac.uk /~dirt/museum/p4-651.html   (213 words)

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