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Topic: Sir Charles Lyell


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  Angus Council | Local History | People of Angus | Sir Charles Lyell (1797 - 1875) an eminent scientist
Charles spent much of his childhood at the family’s other home, Bartley Lodge in the New Forest, where his interest in the natural world was sparked.
Lyell’s prose is witty and subtle, and beautifully argued.
Lyell was the first to discuss metamorphic rocks and their age, and in 1837 he published The Elements of Geology, a textbook for serious students of the science, which, like The Principles he spent his life revising, keeping abreast of new developments.
www.angus.gov.uk /history/features/people/lyell.htm   (452 words)

  
  Sir Charles Lyell - LoveToKnow 1911
SIR CHARLES LYELL (1797-1875), British geologist, was the eldest soar of Charles Lyell of Kinnordy, Forfarshire, and was born on the 14th of November 1797, on the family estate in Scotland.
Lyell was knighted in 1848, and was created a baronet in 1864, in which year he was president of the British Association at Bath.
The Lyell Medal, established in 1875 under the will of Sir Charles Lyell, is cast in bronze and is to be awarded annually (or from time to time) by the Council of the Geological Society.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Sir_Charles_Lyell   (1212 words)

  
 Charles Lyell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Charles Lyell was born in Kinnordy, Angus, the eldest of ten children.
Lyell's father, also named Charles, was a lawyer and botanist of minor repute and first exposed the younger Charles to the study of nature.
Charles Darwin was a close personal friend, and Lyell was one of the first prominent scientists to support The Origin of Species—though he never fully accepted natural selection as the driving engine behind evolution.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Charles_Lyell   (1243 words)

  
 Charles Lyell
Charles Lyell was born in Kinnordy[?], Forfarshire[?], Scotland, the eldest of ten children.
Lyell's father, also named Charles, was a botanist of minor repute and first exposed the younger Charles to the study of nature.
Charles Darwin was a close personal friend, and Lyell was one of the first prominent scientists to support The Origin of Species -- though he never fully accepted natural selection as the driving engine behind evolution.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/si/Sir_Charles_Lyell.html   (471 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Charles Lyell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Lyell is a lunar crater that lies along the eastern edge of the Mare Tranquillitatis, at the northern arm of the bay designated Sinus Concordiae.
Lyell's interpretation of geologic change as the steady accumulation of minute changes over enormously long spans of time was also a central theme in the Principles, and a powerful influence on the young Charles Darwin, who brought the first edition with him aboard H. Beagle.
Charles Robert Darwin FRS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that species originated through evolutionary change, at the same time proposing the scientific theory that natural selection is the mechanism by which such change occurs.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Charles-Lyell   (2831 words)

  
 Sir Charles Lyell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Charles Lyell was a geologist, whose contributions lie mainly in the field of stratigraphy.
Lyell reasoned that the rate of change to the earth’s surface is slow and stable, thus the age of the earth could be estimated.
Lyell calculated the age of the earth by identifying different layers of strata; the deeper the level of strata relative to the earth’s surface, the older the strata.
dragon.zoo.utoronto.ca /~inx420/lyell.htm   (418 words)

  
 Biography of Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. From: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, 1910-1911.
LYELL, SIR CHARLES (1797-1875), British geologist, was the eldest son of Charles Lyell of Kinnordy, Forfarshire, and was born on the 14th of November 1797, on the family estate in Scotland.
Lyell was knighted in 1848, and was created a baronet in 1864, in which year he was president of the British Association at Bath.
The LYELL MEDAL, established in 1875 under the will of Sir Charles Lyell is cast in bronze and is to be awarded annually (or from time to time) by the Council of the Geological Society.
www.gennet.org /facts/lyell.html   (1143 words)

  
 Sir Charles Lyell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Sir Charles Lyell was born in Scotland on November 14, 1797 and died in London on February 22, 1875.
Lyell stressed that the antiquity of human species was far beyond the accepted theories of that time.
Lyell was married and his wife preceded him in death.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/information/biography/klmno/lyell_charles.html   (403 words)

  
 Charles Lyell (1797-1875) geologist.
Charles Lyell was the son of a wealthy gentleman who had inherited a large estate in Scotland.
Lyell was obsessed with the implications of the evolutionary theory of J.B. Lamarck.
Lyell's methods and style greatly influenced a number of important men of science in Victorian Britain, perhaps most famously the young Charles Darwin on the voyage of the Beagle.
www.victorianweb.org /science/lyell.html   (584 words)

  
 Sir Charles Lyell (1797 - 1875)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
The son of the wealthy landowner of Kinnordy, Perthshire, Charles was brought up in Hampshire at the request of his mother who feared that drunkenness was endemic in Scotland.
Lyell cared deeply about social rank, and having already been ostracised by some of his more pious friends, was careful not to admit his support for Darwin's theory until sometime after its publication.
Lyell's visit to the Cupar area in November 1838 was recorded in the Fifeshire Journal.
website.lineone.net /~erikato/fish7.htm   (233 words)

  
 Lyell, Sir Charles. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
He championed and won general acceptance of the theory of uniformity of causes, which was first proposed by James Hutton (as opposed to the theory of catastrophism) in his Principles of Geology (3 vol., 1830–33), which went into 12 editions in his lifetime.
Lyell furthered the idea central to uniformitarianism, that the present processes acted on the earth in the same way all the way through time and at about the same intensity.
Lyell’s work was influential in shaping 19th-century ideas not only in geology specifically, but in scientific fields as a whole; he facilitated later acceptance of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.
www.bartleby.com /65/ly/Lyell-Si.html   (253 words)

  
 Lyell, Sir Charles - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
He championed and won general acceptance of the theory of uniformity of causes, which was first proposed by James Hutton (as opposed to the theory of catastrophism) in his Principles of Geology (3 vol., 1830-33), which went into 12 editions in his lifetime.
Lyell furthered the idea central to uniformitarianism, that the present processes acted on the earth in the same way all the way through time and at about the same intensity.
Lyell's work was influential in shaping 19th-century ideas not only in geology specifically, but in scientific fields as a whole; he facilitated later acceptance of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-lyell-s1i.html   (425 words)

  
 Scottish Geology - Sir Charles Lyell
Lyell agreed with James Hutton's theory that the landscape had evolved over millions of years of (a theory named 'Uniformitarianism' at the time).
Lyell's argument was that the processes observed today such as the action of wind, rain, volcanoes and earthquakes, could be used to explain the geological history of our landscapes.
Lyell had proposed that all species remained unchanged since their creation, but that new species were occasionally created and others became extinct.
www.scottishgeology.com /geology/scottish_geologists/people/charles_lyell.html   (365 words)

  
 wais:topics:charles lyell   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-10)
Lyell's major contribution was demonstrating that physical, chemical, and biological forces operating over long periods of geological time produced all features of the Earth's surface.
Lyell's extensive investigations of rock formations and the strata of the earth's crust convinced him his data were better explained by James Hutton's uniformitarian theory of gradual and ongoing change.
Lyell was born at Kinnordy in eastern Scotland.
www.stanford.edu /group/wais/topics/week100104/charleslyell100104.htm   (447 words)

  
 [No title]
Sir Charles Lyell (1797-1875) was the founding father of modern geology.
Lyell published a wood-cut of a large gully (Figure 1), subsequently referred to as “Lyell’s Gully”, that had formed in less than 20 years (Lyell, 1849).
Sir Charles Lyell was born in Scotland on November 12, 1797.
www.lycos.com /info/charles-lyell--sir-charles-lyell.html   (508 words)

  
 Lyell | Sir | Charles | 1797-1875 | geologist
Sir Charles Lyell was a geologist whose work helped to found the modern notion of geology and geologic time whilst establishing geology as a seperate science.
Lyell's theoretical positions even when wrong, were always carefully reasoned; and he showed an extraordinary capacity even into old age to understand the meaning of new evidence and to change his mind.
Sir Charles Lyell was married to Mary Elizabeth Horner, daughter of educationalist and geologist Leonard Horner (1785-1864) and his brother Henry was married to her sister Katherine Murray Horner.
www.nahste.ac.uk /isaar/GB_0237_NAHSTE_P0219.html   (461 words)

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