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Topic: Slander and libel


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Libel And Slander: Encyclopedia of Everyday Law
The final element of slander or libel is that the defamatory statement damaged the plaintiff's reputation, and that the plaintiff suffered damages as a result.
Certain defamatory messages are slanderous or libelous PER SE, meaning that the plaintiff need not prove that the message damaged his or her reputation.
Libel or slander per se occurs when the message accuses the plaintiff of committing a crime, of having a loathsome disease, or of being professionally incompetent.
law.enotes.com /everyday-law-encyclopedia/libel-and-slander   (1950 words)

  
 Slander and libel
Libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the legal term for the tort of making a communication that would tend to lower its hearers' or readers' opinion(s) of the person(s) the communication was about.
Modern libel and slander laws, as implemented in many Western nations, are generally descended from English defamation law[?].
Zenger's case also established that libel cases, though they were civil rather than criminal cases, could be heard by a jury, which would have the authority to rule on the allegations and to set the amount of monetary damages awarded.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/sl/Slander.html   (1289 words)

  
 Los Angeles Lawyer - Slander and Libel
In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someone's reputation.
Modern libel and slander laws as implemented in many but not all Commonwealth nations, in the United States, and in the Republic of Ireland, are originally descended from English defamation law.
English law allows actions for libel to be brought in the High Court for any published statements which defame a named or identifiable individual or individuals in a manner which causes them loss in their trade or profession, or causes a reasonable person to think worse of him, her or them.
www.danataschner.com /slander_and_libel.html   (2587 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - libel and slander (Legal Terms And Concepts) - Encyclopedia
In common law, written defamation was libel and spoken defamation was slander.
The Sullivan ruling shifted the burden of proof in many libel cases from the defendant to the plaintiff, who must now prove the falsehood was issued with actual malice, that is, with deliberate knowledge that the statement was both incorrect and defamatory.
Libel suits apply not only to the media and public personalities but also to businesses, which account for approximately 70% of all suits.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/L/libel.html   (749 words)

  
 Modrall Sperling :: Libel and Slander
Usually, libel is defamation by written or printed words, while slander is the communication of a defamatory statement by spoken words or by gestures.
Slander was per se if the defamatory impact was especially egregious, as when a publisher falsely stated that a person had committed a serious crime involving moral turpitude, or that a woman was unchaste.
Libels that required proof of additional facts to support their defamatory meaning were considered per quod, and required proof of special damages.
www.modrall.com /articles/article_12.html   (5920 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Slander and libel
Libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort of making a false statement of fact that injures someone's reputation.
Sullivan established that for a plaintiff to win a libel ruling against a newspaper, "actual malice" or "reckless negligence" must be proved on the part of the paper if the statement in question is about a public official or public figure.
It is also the largest libel award (CAD 1,600,000 against the church) upheld in Canada and part of the ongoing legal problems of Scientology.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Defamation   (1723 words)

  
 Unfettered Press: Libel Law in the United States
Libel is a legal term that describes a written form of defamation, which the dictionary defines as a "false or unjustified injury to someone's good reputation." Sometimes the word slander is used in the same breath as libel.
Libel cases, which are part of civil (rather than criminal) courtroom proceedings, may be heard by juries, and it is up to the jury to decide whether a publication has printed libelous information about someone.
And in one of the largest libel verdicts ever reached against the media, a former district attorney from Texas named Victor Feazell was awarded $58 million in April 1991 after a Dallas television station accused him of accepting bribes to fix drunken driving cases.
usinfo.state.gov /products/pubs/press/press08.htm   (2228 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for libel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
libel and slander in law, types of defamation.
Libel cases diminish, study reports; but access litigation is on the rise.
Media and libel: rising losses; more than three-quarters of jury trials lost; courts uphold first $3 million award.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=libel   (579 words)

  
 SLANDER - LIBEL - DEFAMATION - WADDELL & MAGAN - MONTANA
M.C.A. Written words and pictures are considered “libelous,” while spoken words are called “slander.” Generally, defamatory radio and television broadcasts are considered to be libel, rather than slander.
Libel or slander is said to have occurred when it is “published,” that is, when it is printed, or said.
M.C.A. A libel or a slander is committed every time the false statement is repeated by its original maker or by another person, even though that person is repeating the defamatory statement accurately.
personal-injury.montana-injury-lawyer.com /defamation-libel-slander.htm   (662 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Libel - For comments about an individual to be libelous, they must: (1) be false and (2) injure that person's reputation.
Slander - Similar to libel except that it appears in transitory form, such as speech, rather than in a published medium such as print or a internet server.
Defamation consists of the related torts of libel (written statements) or slander (oral statements), which involve a false statement tending to injure the reputation of another.
iml.jou.ufl.edu /projects/STUDENTS/Patillo/libel.htm   (307 words)

  
 [No title]
Thus, slander was readily punished and the defamation suit soon became a popular vehicle for vindication and self-defense following most of the secular trials that ended in acquittal for the accused.
By 1650, the popularity of the slander suit in civil, or common law courts was so great that judges imposed rules on interpretation and limitations, often quite arbitrarily, in an attempt to reduce the caseload and lighten the dockets.
A libel defendant even lacked the safeguard against an unjust verdict assured by common law slander: truth, an absolute defense in slander, initially was not even admissible in an action for libel.
www.csulb.edu /~crsmith/libel.html   (10147 words)

  
 LIBEL AND SLANDER
Libel is a lawsuit based on written defamatory communications--communications that tend to injure someone’s reputation.
Slander is a lawsuit based on spoken defamatory communications--communications that tend to injure someone’s reputation.
Instead, most libelous publications and broadcasts are unlikely to produce lawsuits because one or more of the legal defenses that applies in libel law covers them.
commfaculty.fullerton.edu /afellow/MassMediaLaw/LibelandSlander.html   (1030 words)

  
 FAQ's
One must consider whether a libel action is the only method of achieving the corporation's particular objective or if a solution can be resolved through an apology, retraction, or by writing rebuttal articles or letters to the editor.
Libel actions are often heard by juries, which compounds the uncertainty inherent in the litigation process.
This answer is no. One cannot escape liability for defamation by putting the libel behind a prefix such as "I have been told that..." or "It is rumoured that...", and then asserting that it was true that one had been told or that it was in fact being rumoured....
www.cyberlibel.com /libel.html   (1250 words)

  
 Slander Libel - Best-Ranks.com
The difference between slander and libel is that libel is the written or otherwise published, public defamation of a person or entity such as an organization or company, while slander is the spoken false defamation of a person or entity.
Recently the difference between slander and libel has become less distinct since speaking on public television or radio amounts to libel because of the public dissemination of the spoken words.
United States law dictates that for something to be considered libel it must be proven that the one making the libelous charges did so with malicious intent and with full knowledge that the statements were false.
www.best-ranks.com /slander_libel.htm   (464 words)

  
 RatcliffeBlog—Mitch's Open Notebook: Libel, defamation, slander and confidentiality: A brief guide for citizen ...
Defamation, slander and libel are the same thing, essentially, but each is defined based on the way a false statement about a person is conveyed.
A slander is a spoken defamation, whether that act of speech is public and one-time or recorded and redistributed.
In all cases, the truth is an absolute defense against charges of libel, slander or defamation (except in totalitarian countries or those not under the rule of law, where a judge can rule arbitrarily in favor of a powerful person).
www.ratcliffeblog.com /archives/2005/01/libel_defamatio.html   (2038 words)

  
 Defamation - Encyclopedia Dramatica
Traditionally, slander and libel were two separate torts.
Slander dealt with spoken untruths and libel with written untruths.
Slander or libel and accusation of either will result in an immediate internet trial.
www.encyclopediadramatica.com /index.php/Slander   (719 words)

  
 Libel and Slander Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. L.12   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
  (1)  No defendant in an action for a libel in a newspaper is entitled to the benefit of sections 5 and 6 unless the names of the proprietor and publisher and the address of publication are stated either at the head of the editorials or on the front page of the newspaper.
(2)  In an action for a libel in a broadcast, the defendant may plead in mitigation of damages that the libel was broadcast without actual malice and without gross negligence and that before the commencement of the action, or at the earliest opportunity afterwards, the defendant broadcast a full apology for the libel.
  In an action for libel or slander, where the statement of defence does not assert the truth of the statement complained of, the defendant may not give evidence in chief at trial, in mitigation of damages, concerning the plaintiff's character or the circumstances of publication of the statement, except,
www.e-laws.gov.on.ca /DBLaws/Statutes/English/90l12_e.htm   (1122 words)

  
 slanderandlibel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In most instances debaters with use an information at hand to turn the public to side with their way of thinking, and that means by the end of the election both parties will be covered in mud from dragging each other through the dirt.
Slander is a type of calumny that is spoken, and doesn’t have to be written down and published.
Even if the world was coming to an end I think debaters would still use slander and libel as a part of their campaign and always will.
www.bsu.edu /web/adraab/slanderandlibel.html   (315 words)

  
 Slander and libel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
If the defendant libels the plaintiff and then runs the defense of truth and fails, he may be said to have aggravated the harm.
English law allows actions for libel to be brought in the High Court for any published statements which are alleged to defame a named or identifiable individual or individuals in a manner which causes them loss in their trade or profession, or causes a reasonable person to think worse of him, her or them.
The Citizen (1988), 44 C.C.L.T. Defamatory libel is equally valid as a criminal offense under the Criminal Code, according to the Supreme Court of Canada: R.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Slander_and_libel   (4872 words)

  
 Slander and Libel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Slander is oral defamation and libel is written defamation.
Libel is also used to refer to defamation that is in print, picture or any other permanent visual form.
If you state or imply that someone does not really own some piece of property, when they in fact own it, you may be libel if the owner is then unable to sell the property at the desired price because of your statements.
www.smartagreements.com /bltopics/Bltopi58.html   (318 words)

  
 The Libel and Slander Act   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Under The Libel and Slander Act, a plaintiff may make a claim that the words used against him or her are defamatory.
A defendant in a libel or slander case who has denied the allegation or who has a judgment given against him may give evidence in mitigation of damages.
No action for libel in a newspaper can proceed until the plaintiff has given the defendant five day’s notice, in the case of a daily newspaper, and 14 day’s notice, in the case of a weekly newspaper, of his or her intention to bring an action.
www.saskjustice.gov.sk.ca /legislation/summaries/libelSlanderact.shtml   (666 words)

  
 Should Audio-Visual Defamation on the Internet be Treated as Libel or Slander?
This distinction was often important: In order to obtain a damages in a suit for slander, the plaintiff had to make a specific showing of how his or her reputation had been harmed (there are enumerated content-based exceptions to this requirement).4 Proving this harm was (and is) not always an easy task.
However, in an action for libel, harm was presumed.5 Therefore, if the plaintiff was unable to demonstrate specific harm, this distinction, between libel and slander, would have been dispositive as to whether or not the plaintiff was financially compensated for his or her reputational loss -- no small matter.
Thus, once again, in such aforementioned cases where the plaintiff is unable to demonstrate actual harm, this distinction, between libel and slander, may yet once again prove dispositive as to whether or not the plaintiff's efforts to secure damages succeeds or fails.
www.uiowa.edu /~cyberlaw/cls99/sempaper/zelote416.html   (4231 words)

  
 Libel and Slander
The following information regarding libel and slander is brought to you as a public service by the lawyers of the State of Oregon.
Libel and slander are two forms of defamation.
Slander is defamation by oral or spoken communication.
www.osbar.org /public/legalinfo/1186.htm   (614 words)

  
 Libel and Slander   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
"Libel" involves the publishing of a falsehood that harms someone.
Slander is the same doctrine applied to the spoken word.
Both are a matter of state laws, which usually (not always) require that the falsehood be intentional.
www.spectacle.org /freespch/musm/libel.html   (100 words)

  
 Slander & Libel - Objectivism Online Forum
For example, I know someone who was theatened with a slander suit for telling an incriminating story (it was actually a true story, but for the sake of argument suppose it was false) about a person to a potential employer that lost the potential employee his job.
I believe that libel and slander are civil actions, not criminal.
Slander and libel also can refer to revealing information that may or may not be true, but cannot be proven, and is private/personal and/or defamatory.
forum.objectivismonline.net /index.php?showtopic=468   (1247 words)

  
 Libel and Slander Act
(b) if the newspaper or periodical publication in which the libel appeared is one ordinarily published at intervals exceeding one week, that the defendant offered to publish the apology in a newspaper or periodical publication to be selected by the plaintiff in the action.
(2) In an action for a libel in a broadcast, the defendant may plead in mitigation of damages that the libel was broadcast without actual malice and without gross negligence and that before the commencement of the action, or at the earliest opportunity afterwards, the defendant broadcast a full apology for the libel.
13 (1) In actions of libel and slander the plaintiff may allege that the words or matter complained of were used in a defamatory sense, specifying the defamatory sense without any prefatory allegation to show how the words or matter were used in that sense.
www.qp.gov.bc.ca /statreg/stat/L/96263_01.htm   (1807 words)

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