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Topic: Slavic languages


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In the News (Sun 23 Apr 17)

  
  Slavonic languages
In the spoken Slavic dialects (as opposed to the sharply differentiated literary languages) the linguistic frontiers are not always apparent.
The separate development of South Slavic was caused by a break in the links between the Balkan and the West Slavic groups that resulted from the settling of the Magyars in Hungary during the 10th century and from the Germanization of the Slavic regions of Bavaria and Austria.
The comparatively early rise of the West Slavic (and the westernmost South Slavic) languages as separate literary vehicles was related to a variety of religious and political factors that resulted in the decline of the western variants of the Church Slavonic language.
www.rkp-montreal.org /en/05slavoniclanguages.html   (5789 words)

  
  Slavic Languages
Slavic languages is a subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages.
Grammatically the Slavic languages, with the exception of Bulgarian and Macedonian, have a highly developed inflection of the noun, with up to seven cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, locative, instrumental, and vocative).
Members of the Slavic subfamily are more conservative and thus closer to Proto-Indo-European than languages in the Germanic and Romance groups, as is witnessed by their preservation of seven of the eight cases for the noun that Proto-Indo-European possessed and by their continuation of aspects for the verb.
www.slavism.com /slavic   (815 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Slavic language
Members of the Slavic subfamily are more conservative and thus closer to Proto-Indo-European than languages in the Germanic and Romance groups, as is witnessed by their preservation of seven of the eight cases for the noun that Proto-Indo-European possessed and by their continuation of aspects for the verb.
Serbo-Croatian is the language spoken in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia-Hercegovina, and Montenegro.
Language tapes made years ago to accompany Magner were re-recorded in 1997 and now present a more versatile handling of the lesson materials, including separate Serbian and Croatian versions, as well as a version in which both are employed for comparison.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Slavic-language   (1507 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Slavic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Western subgroup is composed of Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian, languages spoken in Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Yugoslavia, and adjacent regions.
Slavic languages descend from a dialect of Proto-Slavic[?], their parent language[?], which developed from a language that was also the ancestor of Proto-Baltic[?], the parent of the Baltic languages.
There is also a planned language called Slovio that is based on and easily understandable to persons speaking at least one Slavic language.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/sl/Slavic_languages   (892 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Balto-Slavic languages
The Balto-Slavic language group is a hypothetical language group consisting of the Baltic and Slavic language subgroups of the Indo-European family.
Baltic and Slavic languages were not written down until 15th and 9th centuries A.D.; thus, the historical record tracing the development of the languages is limited.
Baltic and Slavic languages both belong to the Satem sub-group of the Indo-European languages.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Balto-Slavic_languages   (515 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Pomeranians
Pomeranians (Pomorzanie) are a group of Slavic tribes living in historical region of Pomerania along the shore of Baltic Sea between Oder and Vistula rivers.
Slovincian is an extinct dialect of the Pomeranian language, spoken between the lakes Gardno and Lebsko in Pomerania.
Category: Slavic tribes The Kashubian-Pomeranian Association (Kashubian-Pomeranian: Kaszebsko-Pomorscze Zrzeszenie, Polish: Zrzeszenie Kaszubsko-Pomorskie) is the regional non-governmental organization of the Kashubians, Pomeranians and people interested in the regional affairs of Kashubia and Pomerania in northern Poland.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Pomeranians   (596 words)

  
 Polish Language
Slavic languages are "case languages" and word order is not as stable as in English.
Polish is spoken by 50 million people and is part of the western branch of Slavic languages, and belongs to the Indo-European family.
It emerged from the Proto-Slavic language as used as the mother tongue of all Slavic tribes in the past.
www.staypoland.com /polish.htm   (511 words)

  
 Slavic Languages Department at Brown University
The Department of Slavic Languages is Brown University’s center for studying the cultures and literatures of Russia and other Slavic countries.
The department has remained in the vanguard of Slavic studies with its flexible and innovative approaches to the field, which include strategic links to performing arts, history, economics, and international relations, among other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.
The department’s primary mission is to educate Slavic studies researchers, specialists, and teachers in an interdisciplinary, cross-fertilizing environment.
www.brown.edu /Departments/Slavic_Languages   (149 words)

  
 Modern Languages: Slavic Division
FSU's Slavic Division provides thorough instruction in Russian and Slavic languages, culture and civilization, and literature at the undergraduate and MA levels.
There are 410 million speakers of Slavic languages worldwide – 270 million of whom speak Russian.
Today, the study of Slavic languages and cultures is more important than ever.
www.fsu.edu /~modlang/divisions/russian   (208 words)

  
 Mirago : Science: Social Sciences: Linguistics: Languages: Natural: Indo-European: Slavic
Early Dialectal Diversity in South Slavic I - A first attempt by Frederik Kortlandt (1982) to present a survey of dialectal phonology in the south Slavic languages.
Early Dialectal Diversity in South Slavic II - Scholarly article (2003) on variations in the historical phonology of south Slavic languages, by Frederik Kortlandt.
Slavic Accentuation: A Study in Relative Chronology - Electronic version of a 1974 monograph by Frederik Kortlandt concerning the history of the Slavic accentuation system.
www.mirago.co.uk /scripts/dir.aspx?cat=Top%2fScience%2fSocial_Sciences%2fLinguistics%2fLanguages%2fNatural%2fIndo-European%2fSlavic   (337 words)

  
 The Slavic Languages - Cambridge University Press
The Slavic group of languages - the fourth largest Indo-European sub-group - is one of the major language families of the modern world.
This book, written by two leading scholars in Slavic linguistics, presents a survey of all aspects of the linguistic structure of the Slavic languages, considering in particular those languages that enjoy official status.
Accessibly written and comprehensive in its coverage, this book will be welcomed by scholars and students of Slavic languages, as well as linguists across the many branches of the discipline.
www.cambridge.org /catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521223156   (206 words)

  
 Slavic languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Because the Slavic group of languages seems to be closer to the Baltic group than to any other, some scholars combine the two in a Balto-Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European classification.
Today, for the most part, Slavic languages are spoken in E Europe and N Asia.
Other Slavic languages (such as Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Macedonian, and Bulgarian) use variations of the Cyrillic alphabet as a result of the influence of the Orthodox Eastern Church.
www.bartelby.com /65/sl/Slavicla.html   (917 words)

  
 USC College : Academics : Slavic Languages and Literatures
In USC College’s Slavic languages and literature department, faculty and students jointly develop insights into the history and character of this pivotal region, with a special focus on Russia.
To gain firsthand knowledge of the language and culture, students may study in Moscow, St. Petersburg or a lesser-known Slavic city for a summer, semester or year.
Slavic faculty specialize in art and writing from Kandinsky to Dostoevsky, and Chekhov to Eisenstein.
www.usc.edu /schools/college/academics/slavic.html   (205 words)

  
 Yale > Slavic Languages & Literatures > Home
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University, which is one of the oldest programs of its kind in the United States, was born of the vision of two of the most remarkable figures in the University's twentieth-century history.
Slavic department faculty are recognized leaders in their scholarly fields both nationally and internationally, and have established themselves as popular and influential teachers on campus.
The Department's varied course offerings are enriched by the extensive Slavic holdings in the Yale University Library system, which is one of the greatest research collections in the world.
www.yale.edu /slavic   (249 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The two brothers' second mission (860) by the Byzantine Emperor Michael III and the Patriarch of Constantinople Photius (a professor of Cyril's at the University and his guiding light in earlier years) was a missionary expedition to the Khazar Khagan in order to prevent the expansion of Judaism there.
In 862 they were invited by prince Rastislav to propagate Christianity in the Slavic language in Great Moravia, which they did until their deaths, Cyril's in 869 (in Rome) and Methodius' in 885 (in Great Moravia).
The language derived from Old Church Slavonic, known as Church Slavonic, is still used in liturgy by several Eastern Orthodox churches.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Saints_Cyril_and_Methodius   (777 words)

  
 Slavic Languages and Literatures at U of T
The countries of the Slavic world have played a prominent role in international life, and have produced numerous writers, musicians, philosophers, and scientists of note.
We offer undergraduate and graduate (both MA and PhD) programs in Croatian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Serbian and Ukrainian Languages and Literatures as well as a graduate program in Slavic Linguistics and undergraduate courses in Macedonian.
On this web site you will find information about the department, degree programs, courses, language programs, faculty, staff, and students, and latest news and events at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
www.utoronto.ca /slavic   (237 words)

  
 Indiana University Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Indiana University was first organized in 1947 as the Department of Slavic Studies under the leadership of Michael Ginsburg, the university's first professor of Russian.
The department's Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Languages (SWSEEL) remains the largest such program in the United States, offering students the opportunity to complete a full year of college language instruction during a single eight-week summer session for reduced tuition rates.
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is located in Ballantine Hall, near the center of the IU-Bloomington campus.
www.indiana.edu /~iuslavic   (329 words)

  
 Zbigniew Golab, Slavic Languages & Literatures   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Arumanian is a Balkan Romance language, closely related to Romanian, that is spoken in the southern Balkans.
He was on the faculty at the Catholic University of Lublin and at the Slavic Institute of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences before joining the Chicago faculty as Professor in 1962.
Golab is survived by his wife, Janina, Lecturer in Slavic Languages & Literatures, and a son, Julius.
chronicle.uchicago.edu /940414/golab.shtml   (345 words)

  
 The Slavic Languages - Cambridge University Press
Spoken by 297 million people, it is one of the major language families of the modern world.
This book presents a survey of all aspects of the linguistic structure of the Slavic languages.
Roland Sussex and Paul Cubberley cover Slavic dialects and sociolinguistic issues, and the socio-historical evolution of the Slavic languages, in addition to general linguistic topics.
www.cambridge.org /us/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521223156   (77 words)

  
 Indiana University Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Indiana University was first organized in 1947 as the Department of Slavic Studies under the leadership of Michael Ginsburg, the university's first professor of Russian.
The department's Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Languages (SWSEEL) remains the largest such program in the United States, offering students the opportunity to complete a full year of college language instruction during a single eight-week summer session for reduced tuition rates.
The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is located in Ballantine Hall, near the center of the IU-Bloomington campus.
www.iub.edu /~iuslavic   (329 words)

  
 Evaluation of programmes in Slavic Languages and East and Central European Studies at four Swedish universities
This report presents the results of the evaluation of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in Slavic Languages and East and Central European Studies at Swedish universities conducted by the National Agency for Higher Education during 2002.
An additional proposal is the creation of a national subject council for Slavic studies and a guarantee of funding for languages that cannot meet their own costs under the current funding system.
In order to remedy this situation, the panel of assessors therefore recommends the Slavic departments to stipulate a quantity of text that is realistic in relationship to the extent of the courses.
www.hsv.se /reports/2003/5.539a949110f3d5914ec800073645.html.printable   (1165 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic Online: Series Introduction
Likewise, South Slavic retains the nasal ę in the accusative plural of ja-stem nouns, whereas in East and West Slavic the nasality is lost.
It is often assumed that the language is the same as that which was spoken in the centuries preceding the work of Cyril and Methodius; but by the time of the extant manuscripts were written, the actual spoken language was beginning to diverge from the written language.
This is certainly an oversimplification, since the language spoken by Cyril and Methodius must have been in use for quite some time prior to their work, and there are later texts that show definite affinity with the OCS discussed in grammars.
www.utexas.edu /cola/depts/lrc/eieol/ocsol-0-X.html   (1716 words)

  
 Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, UC Berkeley
Who we are: We study and teach the languages, literature, and cultures of Russian, other Slavic peoples, and their neighbors in Europe and Western Asia.
The Slavs and their neighbors have been at the forefront of cultural developments in the past and they are now at the center of ongoing, profound cultural and political change.
Languages: We teach Russian at all levels (through eight semesters) and a number of other languages of Slavic peoples and their neighbors.
ls.berkeley.edu /dept/slavic   (194 words)

  
 Characteristics of the Polish Language at Eduseek.com
Slavic Languages - Information introducing Slavic languages and their characteristics.
Slavic Languages: General Characteristics - Slavic languages - an overview of grammar, vocabulary and writing.
Slavic Languages Map - A clickable map showing all countries that speak a Slavic language as well as providing information about each of the languages.
www.eduseek.com /topic.aspx?ID=3337   (95 words)

  
 University of Pittsburgh: Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
Welcome to the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh, main campus.
Slavic-related courses on language, literature, and culture are offered to both graduate and undergraduate students year-round.
The Russian and East European Summer Language Institute (SLI) is one of the country's finest progams in intensive Slavic and East European acquisition.
www.pitt.edu /~slavic   (168 words)

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