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Topic: Smerdis of Persia


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 Daily Bible Study - Ancient Empires - Persia
They settled in Persia, on the eastern side of the Persian Gulf.
The Persians were Aryans, speaking one of the eastern Indo-European group of languages.
Persepolis (see map) was an ancient city of Persia that served as a ceremonial capital for Darius and his successors.
www.keyway.ca /htm2002/persia.htm   (311 words)

  
  Vacilando.net on Smerdis Of Persia
Smerdis (also Bardia) was the son of Cyrus the Great whose name was usurped by an impostor, a magian reportedly named Gaumata.
The history of the false Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle in the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.vacilando.net /index.php?title=Smerdis_of_Persia   (650 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Smerdis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Smerdis was the younger son of Cyrus the Great who, according to Ctesias, on his deathbed appointed him governor of the eastern provinces (cf.
The history of the false Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle iii the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/sm/Smerdis   (558 words)

  
  Smerdis of Persia
Smerdis was the younger son of Cyrus the Great who, according to Ctesias, on his deathbed appointed him governor of the eastern provinces (cf.
The history of the false Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle iii the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/sm/Smerdis_of_Persia.html   (533 words)

  
 Smerdis of Persia Information
According to both Herodotus and his successor Darius (in the Behistun Inscription), Cambyses II, before he set out to Egypt, secretly caused his brother to be murdered, being afraid that he might attempt a rebellion during his absence.
His death was not known to the people, and so in the spring of 522 a usurper pretended to be Smerdis and proclaimed himself king on a mountain near the Persian town Paishiyauvada.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle in the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Smerdis_of_Persia   (564 words)

  
  Smerdis of Persia
Smerdis was the younger son of Cyrus the Great who, according to Ctesias, on his deathbed appointed him governor of the eastern provinces (cf.
The history of the false Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle iii the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/s/sm/smerdis_of_persia.html   (581 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Persia
Persia under Generals Outram and Havelock, it was terminated on 4 March 1857, by a treaty signed at Paris, favourable to the demands of the British.
Persia, resigned in 1845, and was succeeded, in 1848, by Joseph Audo, who died in 1878, and was succeeded by Elia Abbolionan, who died in 1894 and was succeeded by Ebedjesus Khayyat, after whose death at Bagdad, in 1899, the patriarchal dignity was conferred in 1900 upon the present incumbent, Joseph Emanuel.
Persia was raised to the dignity of an
www.newadvent.org /cathen/11712a.htm   (13488 words)

  
 Persia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Cambyses II, son of Cyrus, did away with Smerdis, another son of Cyrus, in order to have unchallenged power, but when Cambyses was absent on a successful raid into Egypt, an imposter claiming to be Smerdis appeared, and usurped the throne.
The religion of Persia itself was Zoroastrianism, and the unity of Persia may be attributed in part to the unifying effect of that broadly established faith.
After Alexander the Great’s death, Persia fell for the most part to Seleucus I and his successors (the Seleucids), but their grasp on the vast territories was weak administratively, although they did introduce a vital Hellenistic culture, mingling Greek with Persian elements.
www.bartleby.com /65/pe/Persia.html   (1898 words)

  
 Darius I of Persia
In Susiana, Babylon, Media, Sagartia, and Margiana, usurpers arose, pretending to be of the old royal race, and gathered large armies around them; in Persia itself Vahyazdata imitated the example of Gaumata and was acknowledged by the majority of the people as the true Bardiya.
Darius with only a small army of Persians and Medes and some trustworthy generals overcame all difficulties, and in 520 and 519 all the rebellions were put down (Babylon rebelled twice, Susiana even three times), and the authority of Darius was established throughout the empire.
He tried to develop the commerce of the empire, and sent an expedition down the Kabul and the Indus, led by the Carian captain Scylax of Caryanda, who explored the Indian Ocean from the mouth of the Indus to Suez.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/d/da/darius_i_of_persia.html   (1117 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription - Cyrus Cylinder - Crystalinks
After the fall of the Persian Empire and its successors, and the fall of cuneiform writing into disuse, the nature of the inscription was forgotten and fanciful origins became the norm.
For centuries, instead of being attributed to Darius - one of the first Persian kings - it was believed to be from the reign of Chosroes II of Persia - one of the last.
It was not until 1598, when the Englishman Robert Sherley saw the inscription during a diplomatic mission to Persia on behalf of Austria, that the inscription first came to the attention of western European scholars.
www.crystalinks.com /cyrustablets.html   (1665 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Smerdis of Persia
Smerdis (also Bardia) was a son of Cyrus the Great whose name was allegedly usurped by an impostor, a magus (member of the magian priestly class) reportedly named Gaumata.
The history of the 'false' Smerdis is narrated by Herodotus and Ctesias according to official traditions; Cambyses before his death supposedly confessed to the murder of his brother, and in public explained the whole fraud.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle in the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in September 522.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Smerdis_of_Persia   (766 words)

  
 Persia
Persia is a historical nation which is now known as Iran.
At Masjid-al-Salaman in southwest Persia, the first major commercial oil strike in the Middle East was made on May 26, 1908.
Persia was renamed Iran on March 21, 1935, after Aryan.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/p/pe/persia.html   (351 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Darius the Great by Jacob Abbott
Smerdis, by living secluded, and devoting himself to retired and private pleasures, was the more likely to escape public observation; while Patizithes, acting as his prime minister of state, could attend councils, issue orders, review troops, dispatch embassies, and perform all the other outward functions of supreme command, with safety as well as pleasure.
Smerdis, on his part, was content to take possession of the palaces, the parks, and the [64] gardens of Media and Persia, and to live in them in retired and quiet luxury and splendor.
The two magi, Smerdis the king and Patizithes his brother, had some cause, it seems, to fear that the nobles about the court, and the officers of the Persian army, were not without suspicions that the reigning monarch was not the real son of Cyrus.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=abbott&book=darius&story=smerdis   (3530 words)

  
 JewishEncyclopedia.com - PERSIA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A Magian priest, Bardiya, "the False Smerdis," usurped the crown and reigned for seven months, until Darius, a member of a side branch of the Persian royal family, discovered the imposture, slew the pretender, and swayed the Achæmenian scepter with conspicuous ability for nearly half a century.
The Arab conquest of Persia and the defeat and death of Yezdegerd III.
The majority of Jews in Persia are engaged in trade, in jewellery, in wine and opium manufacture, as musicians, dancers, scavengers, pedlars, and in other professions to which is attached no great respect.
www.jewishencyclopedia.com /view.jsp?artid=210&letter=P   (1995 words)

  
 Smerdis of Persia at AllExperts
According to both Herodotus and his successor Darius (in the Behistun Inscription), Cambyses II, before he set out to Egypt, secretly caused his brother to be murdered, being afraid that he might attempt a rebellion during his absence.
His death was not known to the people, and so in the spring of 522 a usurper pretended to be Smerdis and proclaimed himself king on a mountain near the Persian town Paishiyauvada.
The prevalent Greek form Smerdis has assimilated the Persian name to the Greek (Asiatic) name Smerdis or Smerdies, which occurs in the poems of Alcaeus and Anacreon.
en.allexperts.com /e/s/sm/smerdis_of_persia.htm   (653 words)

  
 SMERDIS
Smerdis was a Persian king of infamous memory.
His death was not known to the people, and so in the spring of 522 a usurper pretended to be Smerdis and proclaimed himself king on a mountain near the Persian town Pishiyauv~da.
It is certain that Smerdis transferred the seat of government to Media; and here in a castle iii the district of Nisaya he was surprised and killed by Darius and his six associates in October 521.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/SMERDIS   (569 words)

  
 Biography of Darius I of Persia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
But this sudden change was the signal for an attempt on the part of all the eastern provinces to regain their independence.
In Susiana, Babylon, Media, Sagartia, and Margiana, usurpers arose, pretending to be of the old royal race, and gathered large armies around them; in Persia itself Vahyazdata imitated the example of Gaumata and was acknowledged by the majority of the people as the true Bardiya.
Darius with only a small army of Persians and Medes and some trustworthy generals overcame all difficulties, and in 520 and 519 all the rebellions were put down (Babylon rebelled twice, Susiana even three times), and the authority of Darius was established throughout the empire.
biography-1.qardinalinfo.com /d/Darius_I_of_Persia.html   (1083 words)

  
 PERSIA
The Magi were a caste of priests in Persia who were known for there abilities in dream interpretation, astrology, and the use of the liver of a sacrificial sheep as an oracle.
It also created for Persia three areas of potential conflict: with the Egyptians to the south, with the Lydians in Asia Minor, and with the Babylonians to the west.
It was not Smerdis, the son of Cyrus, that threatened his kingship, but Smerdis, the brother of the Magus.
www.worldhistory1a.homestead.com /PERSIA.html   (6707 words)

  
 Darius I of Persia - Wikinfo
In Susiana, Babylon, Media, Sagartia, and Margiana, usurpers arose, pretending to be of the old royal race, and gathered large armies around them; in Persia itself Vahyazdata imitated the example of Gaumata and was acknowledged by the majority of the people as the true Bardiya.
Darius with only a small army of Persians and Medes and some trustworthy generals overcame all difficulties, and in 520 and 519 all the rebellions were put down (Babylon rebelled twice, Susiana even three times), and the authority of Darius was established throughout the empire.
He tried to develop the commerce of the empire, and sent an expedition down the Kabul and the Indus, led by the Carian captain Scylax of Caryanda, who explored the Indian Ocean from the mouth of the Indus to Suez.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Darius_I_of_Persia&printable=yes   (3438 words)

  
 Darius I of Persia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
When, after the suicide of Cambyses II (March 521), the usurper Gaumata ruled undisturbed over the whole empire under the name of Bardiya (''Smerdis''), son of Cyrus, no one dared to gainsay him.
This sudden change in the central authority was perceived by the rulers of the eastern provinces as an opportunity to regain their independence.
Persia under Darius probably had connections with Carthage (cf.
darius-i-of-persia.iqnaut.net   (1238 words)

  
 Behistun Inscription
The text itself is a statement by Darius I of Persia, written three times in three different scripts and languages: two languages side by side, Old Persian[?] and Elamite[?], and Akkadian above them.
For centuries, instead of being attributed to Darius -- one of the first Persian kings -- it was believed to be from the reign of II of Persia">Chosroes II of Persia -- one of the last.
In 1598 the inscription came to the attention of Western Europe when it was seen by Robert Sherley, an Englishman on a diplomatic mission to Persia in the service of Austria.
www.findword.org /be/behistun-inscription.html   (1005 words)

  
 SMERDIS OF PERSIA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The prevalent Greek form Smerdis has assimilated the Persian name to the Greek name Smerdis or Smerdies, which occurs in the poems of Alcaeus and Anacreon.
Smerdis was the younger son of Cyrus the Great who, according to Ctesias, on his deathbed appointed him governor of the eastern provinces.
His death was annually celebrated in Persia by a feast called “the killing of the magian," at which no magian was allowed to show himself.
www.faktoen.com /wiki/en/sm/Smerdis%20of%20Persia.htm   (531 words)

  
 Cyrus the Great   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Superimposed on modern borders, the Achaemenid Empire under Cyrus' rule extended approximately from Turkey, Israel, and Armenia in the west to Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and the borders of the Indian subcontinent in the east.
An imposter named Gaumata, claiming to be Smerdis, became the sole ruler of Persia for seven months, until he was killed by Darius the Great, the grandson of Arsames, who ruled Persia before Cyrus' rise.
Cyrus' conquests began a new era in the age of empire building, where a vast superstate, comprising many dozens of countries, races, religions, and languages, were ruled under a single administration headed by a central government.
www.tocatch.info /en/Cyrus_the_Persian.htm   (3636 words)

  
 Democracy of Darius
And still to this day the family of Otanes continues to be the only free family in Persia; those who belong to it submit to the rule of the king only so far as they themselves choose; they are bound, however, to observe the laws of the land like the other Persians.
III.89: This he set up in Persia; and afterwards he proceeded to establish twenty governments of the kind which the Persians call satrapies, assigning to each its governor, and fixing the tribute which was to be paid him by the several nations.
Persia alone has not been reckoned among the tributaries---and for this reason, because the country of the Persians is altogether exempt from tax.
www.earth-history.com /Persian/darius.htm   (2777 words)

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