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Topic: Sociology of disaster


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  sociology - Sociology
Sociology is interested in our behavior as social beings; thus the sociological field of interest ranges from the analysis of short contacts between anonymous individuals on the street to the study of global social processes.
Sociology as a scientific discipline emerged in the early 19th century as an academic response to the challenge of modernity: as the world was becoming smaller and more integrated, people's experience of the world was increasingly atomized and dispersed.
In 1919 a sociology department was established in Germany at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich by Max Weber and in 1920 in Poland by Florian Znaniecki.
www.aboutsociology.com /sociology/Sociology   (1599 words)

  
 Sociology Books
These processes of rule-making, relu-violation, and rule-enforcement are the core of human life; and the sociology of deviance is a field of study that is flourishing.
Mario Diani is Professor of Sociology and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Trento.
Instead of seeing the two disciplines in antagonistic terms, it is time to recognize that sociology and economics are in fact part of a single discipline, the object of which is the analysis of social facts, of which economic transactions are in the end merely one aspect.
sociologyindex.com /sociology_books.htm   (12439 words)

  
  ipedia.com: Sociology Article
Sociology is the study of social rules and processes that bind, and separate people not only as individuals, but as members of associations, groups, and institutions.
Sociology is interested in our behavior as social beings; thus the sociological field of interest ranges from the analysis of short contacts between anonymous individuals on the street to the study of global social processes.
Sociology as a discipline emerged in the 19th century as an academic response to the challenge of modernity: as the world is becoming smaller and more integrated, people's experience of the world is increasingly atomized and dispersed.
www.ipedia.com /sociology.html   (1055 words)

  
 VDEM > EM Update Newsletter > Archives > EM Online
When disaster strikes, those directly affected tend to panic, loot and refuse to move to safety - these are typical views of what happens.
According to an expert on the sociology of disaster, these and other misperceptions of disaster in the minds of the public and emergency managers may result in the misallocation of resources.
Many disaster plans are directed at responding to the disaster mythology of deviant anti-social behavior rather than addressing the real needs of the public to deal with the crisis.
www.vaemergency.com /emupdate/archives/disaster_myth/disastermyth.cfm   (644 words)

  
 The world's top Sociology websites
Sociology is the study of social rules and processes that bind, and separate people not only as individuals, but as members of associations, groups, and institutions.
A typical textbook definition of sociology calls it the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies.
Sociology as a discipline emerged in the 19th century as an academic response to the challenge of modernity: as the world is becoming smaller and more integrated, people's experience of the world is increasingly atomized and dispersed.
www.websbiggest.com /dir-wiki.cfm/Sociology   (1350 words)

  
 New Orleans & Disaster Sociology at Resilience Science   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Disaster sociologists say that they are eager to determine how much chaos and looting actually occurred there, and how much was conjured through rumor and news-media exaggeration.
Dynes, “is that in a disaster, decisions are made at lower levels than they are made normally because you’re confronted with a situation, and you can’t get 10 of your colleagues to have a staff meeting to decide what to do.
As disaster management planners design strategies to respond to potential disaster events they (like eco-system analysts) frequently assume a homogeneity or uniformity of factors across neighborhood areas even within same socio-economic zones and predicate their response actions on this basis.
resilience.geog.mcgill.ca /blog/index.php/2005/09/29/new-orleans-disaster-sociology   (2469 words)

  
 New Page 2   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Disaster studies concerns the sociology of disaster, conflict and humanitarian assistance.
In practice, the international and national relief and disaster management organisations often fail to recognise people's local coping-mechanisms and act with top-down attitudes and a lack of cultural sensitivity.
Disaster Studies, after consultation with the lecturers concerned, is willing to accommodate and supervise these open courses and education modules.
www.disasterstudies.nl /education_ds.htm   (1631 words)

  
 USD - Sociology Home   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sociology is excellent preparation for graduate studies in almost any discipline.
Sociology grads are also well prepared for work in education, government, social services, public relations and many other fields.
Sociology is a program within the College of Arts and Sciences, the University’s oldest academic unit.
www.usd.edu /soc   (206 words)

  
 Origins
The social aspects of natural and technological disasters were touched on in the early days of sociology.
Another key happening was the establishment in 1963 of the Disaster Research Center (DRC) at the Ohio State University and directed by three sociologists including Russell Dynes and E. Quarantelli.
Most of the field work was undertaken by graduate students in sociology, many of whom went on to distinguished careers in the area.
www.udel.edu /DRC/IRCD/Origins.html   (649 words)

  
 Sociology of Disaster
This course was developed by Dr. Thomas Drabek of the University of Denver for use by sociology professors.
This course was not intended for use in emergency management curriculums.
It consists of 278 pages and topics include: theoretical approaches to disaster research, theory of disaster response, and community sociological impact of disasters.
training.fema.gov /EMIWEB/edu/sum_courses9.asp   (86 words)

  
 What it costs to prep for disaster - Nov. 9, 2001
But the attacks on Sept. 11 and the war against terrorism have created a heightened sense of awareness among U.S. consumers, many of whom are stocking up on supplies at home - from first-aid kits to non-perishable food and basic tools.
Assembling a supplies kit to deal with both man-made and natural disasters can be a complicated and sometimes pricey undertaking.
Remember that the checklist varies somewhat, depending on the types of natural disasters most common to where you live.
money.cnn.com /2001/11/09/saving/q_costs_disaster/index.htm   (972 words)

  
 The Graduate School at NDSU
The program is built on a core of social science courses to help students approach the study of disasters and emergency management from a sociological perspective.
Disaster area studies include the following subtopics: social and behavioral sciences, disaster types, the emergency manager, and the public and private sector responses to emergencies.
As part of disaster area studies, students will be required to complete two cognates, one in sociology and one in a second field approved by the student's supervisory committee.
www.ndsu.edu /gradschool/bulletin/d_emergency.html   (1607 words)

  
 Methods of Disaster Research
The methods of disaster research are indistinguishable from those used throughout the social sciences.
Also included are chapters on several approaches underutilized thus far in disaster research such as cross-national comparisons, economic modeling, historical methods, and media studies.
Stallings (Ph.D., Sociology, The Ohio State University, 1971) is Professor of Public Policy and Sociology at the University of Southern California.
www-rcf.usc.edu /~rstallin/BookWebSummary.htm   (503 words)

  
 Experts: Biographical Notes -- Environmental management and the mitigation of natural disasters: a gender perspective
She is Professor of Political Sociology at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey.
She is specialized in gender and human development, non-governmental development organizations and development, agrarian sociology and disaster management.
She is a founding member of the Gender and Disaster Network, lead course developer for a new FEMA course on social vulnerability, and principal investigator of an action research project conducting vulnerability and capacity research with low-income women's groups in the Caribbean.
www.un.org /womenwatch/daw/csw/env_manage/experts.html   (1708 words)

  
 Book Reviews: Facing the Unexpected: Disaster Preparedness and Response in the United States
The opening chapter reviews the different approaches to defining and studying disasters, from the classic to the emerging ones, which are summarized and grouped under some debatable, but still useful headings.
Also, it incorporates references to authors outside the restricted field of "sociology of disasters" and outside the U.S. This is particularly appreciable in a book focusing on the U.S. (as announced in its subtitle) and does away with a somewhat parochial outlook encountered in works in the same tradition.
Also, the claim shows scarce attention to a growing body of literature which, though not in the stream of the "sociology of disaster" has provided valuable insights for disaster related topics, also pointing to emergent phenomena, some virtually unexplored in the traditional view.
www.politicalreviewnet.com /polrev/reviews/JCCM/R_0966_0879_073_1004257.asp   (1635 words)

  
 [No title]
It would take a second disaster of the same sort, with apparently similar sources, to deepen one's confidence that the hypothesis is correct.
The impact that disaster sociology has had so far partly depends on conceptual clarity that can be summarized in a vivid or memorable phrase - "dying alone" (Heat Wave) or "the normalization of deviance" (The Challenger Launch Decision).
The bottom line, though, is that the qualitative sociology of disasters serves as a reminder to all the social sciences of how useful they can be.
www.bc.edu /bc_org/rvp/pubaf/04/review.html   (2788 words)

  
 New Towns: Sociology of Disaster
Word is that FEMA will provide some disaster assistance in the form of temporary housing and financial help; already, white food tents are appearing and barracks-style canvas tents are being erected.
They met to do so while paying attention to the emotional and mental state of residents who had had their material possessions and community ties surgically removed in a matter of hours.
Comprising the team charged with examining the sociological implications of Katrina's aftermath were David Brain, professor of sociology at New College of Florida in Sarasota, Fla.; and Emily Talen, associate professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
www.tndtownpaper.com /Volume7/sociology_disaster.htm   (1799 words)

  
 Disaster, Risk, and Society
This course is an amalgam of the major ideas in what are presently seen as two separate but highly interrelated areas of sociology: the sociology of risk and the sociology of disaster.
There is a heck of a lot written on disasters, hazards, crises, catastrophes, etc. that do not include risk and there is a heck of a lot of material on risk that doesn't focus on disasters.
You may want to examine a particular disaster and its effects or you may want to focus on disaster mitigation or response or you may want to look at some aspect of risk.
www.wku.edu /~Douglas.Smith/S346syl2006.htm   (3529 words)

  
 11/29/00 Virtual Library Presentation   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The EIIP Virtual Library topic was "Evaluation of the Project Impact Disaster Resistant Community Initiative." Dr. Kathleen Tierney, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Disaster Research Center (DRC) at the University of Delaware was the guest speaker.
Kathleen Tierney is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware.
Tierney co-edited Disasters, Collective Behavior, and Social Organization with Russell R. Dynes (1994), and with co-authors Michael Lindell and Ronald Perry, she is currently finishing a new book, Facing the Unexpected: Disaster Preparedness and Response in the United States, which will be published early next year by Joseph Henry Press.
www.emforum.org /vlibrary/001129.htm   (458 words)

  
 Weberian Political Sociology   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The specialized field of disaster studies seems to be moving farther away from mainstream sociology, to the detriment of both.
For sociologists working in this field, application of Max Weber’s political sociology is proposed as one way to reconnect their research with longstanding concerns of the discipline.
Its relevance to both contemporary sociology and sociological disaster studies is illustrated through a re-examination of one of the early classic studies of disaster.
www-rcf.usc.edu /~rstallin/WeberAbs.htm   (129 words)

  
 BUBL LINK: Sociology
The Association aims to advance sociology as a science and profession, promoting the contribution and use of sociology to society.
Sociologies of Health and Illness ELearning Databank (SHIELD) produced resource - An interdisciplinary project to create a sustainable and content-rich databank of re-usable e-learning resources which may be shared between disciplines and across institutions, supporting staff and students to embrace technological change and embed it into their practice.
Quarterly electronic journal of sociology for applied sociology, focusing on theoretical, empirical, and methodological discussions which engage with current political, cultural, and intellectual topics and debates.
bubl.ac.uk /link/s/sociology.htm   (946 words)

  
 M U Sociology and Anthropology Home Page
As the world's population, as well as that of the United States, continues to increase, continues to inhabit areas prone to disaster, and continues to develop technologies which produce hazardous environments, each of us is a potential victim.
Most of us tend to believe that disasters are something that OTHERS will experience--but "not me!" Unfortunately, disasters are increasingly common and we are often ill prepared--as individuals, as a community, as a nation.
By completing a course in "The Sociology of Disaster" you should be better prepared to function as an effective member of your community to enhance the chances of improving preparedness, mitigation, and response to possible natural or technological hazards.
muweb.millersville.edu /~socanth/dissyl.html   (289 words)

  
 Sociologist proposes disaster scale to facilitate recovery and research
In his paper, "The Sociology of Disaster: Definitions, Research Questions, Measurements in a Post-September 11, 2001, Environment," Fischer reflects broadly on what sociologically constitutes a disaster and how the terrorist attacks on the United States impact upon earlier academic definitions.
According to Fischer, this 10-category scale would be an important aid in assisting researchers, disaster practitioners, city planners, and policy officials in discerning between the types of appropriate mitigating efforts, planning, and response, based upon the disaster category (DC) assigned by using the scale.
Fischer, an expert in disaster sociology, developed the scale to detail the circumstances that lead to communities diverging from their normal social structure.
www.eurekalert.org /pub_releases/2003-08/asa-spd080803.php   (576 words)

  
 Sociology of disaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sociology of disaster is a special branch of sociology.
The research is predominantly done in the United States, but also in Germany and Italy as well.
Theoretically it includes not only local disasters, but catastrophies on a grand scale.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sociology_of_disaster   (121 words)

  
 The Sociology Ring   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Sociology Ring was started in order to connect the growing number of web sites dealing with the profession.
Academic and clinical sociologists, sociology students (graduate or undergraduate), and others are welcome to join the ring.
Homepage to the Department of sociology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
a.webring.com /hub?ring=sociology   (1733 words)

  
 After The Disaster, Research Booms, Hurricanes, Quakes, Tsunami Focus Interest On A High-Demand Field - CBS News
But quick on the heels of relief workers come the disaster researchers - people who leave the ivory tower of academia and head to the scene, hoping their analyses can improve people's lives the next time calamity strikes.
Barsky, who switched her major from psychology to sociology because she was inspired by a class on the sociology of disaster.
She and Lori Peek, a colleague from Colorado State University, had been discussing the need for more disaster research on children, but they had no idea the opportunity would arise so soon, just as the semester was getting under way.
www.cbsnews.com /stories/2005/11/18/national/main1057306.shtml   (966 words)

  
 American Sociological Association | Home
A collection of fact sheets about sociology as a profession and discipline, including degrees, labor market participation, research funding, and courses offered.
The sociology career pipeline is traced from the baccalaureate to professor in this brief.
See latest announcements of upcoming sociology meetings, calls for papers, funding opportunities, new books, people news, press coverage of sociology, and more.
www.asanet.org   (518 words)

  
 After the disaster | csmonitor.com
In this "drop everything" discipline, it takes some doing to arrange for substitute teachers and child-care at the last minute, but by mid-October they were in Cajun country, interviewing everyone from parents to shelter workers about children in their care.
Disaster research stretches back more than 50 years to World War II and the cold war.
The fact that disaster research is more applied than theoretical has sometimes led other academics to look down their noses at it, Tierney says.
www.csmonitor.com /2005/1117/p14s01-sten.html   (1562 words)

  
 WMU Sociology Faculty 2004-05   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sociology of gender; moralizing emotions; the body; the intersection of race, class, and gender.
Sociology of education, ethnic relations, African studies, theory.
Medical sociology, mental health, disaster, the non-profit sector, evaluation research, and military sociology.
www.wmich.edu /sociology/main/html/faculty.htm   (88 words)

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