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Topic: Sophroniscus


In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
 [No title]
Sophroniscus, (Greek Σωφρονίσκος) husband of Phaenarete, was the father of the philosopher Socrates.
According to tradition, Sophroniscus was by trade a stonemason (a "stone-cutter" or a "stone-polisher"), and enjoyed some margin of success; but neither Plato nor any author before the satirist Timon of Phlius (3rd century B.C.E.) mentions the nature of the family's profession.
Though Clement of Alexandria, Sextus Empiricus, and Diogenes Laertius all quote the same passage from Timon, where Socrates is termed a laxoos or lithoxoos in ancient Greek, Timon's work is polemical and not a serious attempt to transmit literal, historical facts.
www.maxpedia.org /cgi-bin/mp/m.pl?la=en&sw=Sophroniscus   (292 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Sophroniscus
of Athens (469-399) Son of Sophroniscus and Phaenarete of the deme...
He was the son of Sophroniscus and Phaenarete of the Antiochid...
Socrates was the son of Sophroniscus, who was reported to be...
www.amazon.com /s?ie=UTF8&keywords=Sophroniscus&index=blended&page=1   (745 words)

  
 Socrates - New Acropolis
The greatest of the philosophers was born in Alopeka, a town in Attica in the year 470 B.C. His father, Sophroniscus, was a sculptor and his mother, Phaenarete, a midwife - a profession to which Socrates often alluded, comparing it to his philosophical method, mayeutics (from the Greek maieuo, to cause to be born).
This meeting turned out to be decisive for the young Socrates, since the priestess initiated him into the mysteries of Eros, in the Orphic tradition, as Plato was later to show in a masterly way in his dialogue The Symposium, in which he introduced a passage about Diotima.
However, even in antiquity it was thought that he may have been married to the two women at the same time, since bigamy was permitted at a time when the city had been depopulated by wars and plagues.
www.acropolis.org /(S(qya0sz2homkj3v3e5czesr55))/philosophes/Philos.aspx?lang=eng&ID=28   (832 words)

  
 Laches - Introduction
He is a stranger to Lysimachus, but is afterwards recognised as the son of his old friend Sophroniscus, with whom he never had a difference to the hour of his death.
Socrates is also known to Nicias, to whom he had introduced the excellent Damon, musician and sophist, as a tutor for his son, and to Laches, who had witnessed his heroic behaviour at the battle of Delium (compare Symp.).
Both of them, by their own confession, have been ill-educated, as is further shown by the circumstance that Lysimachus, the friend of Sophroniscus, has never heard of the fame of Socrates, his son; they belong to different circles.
www.worldwideschool.org /library/books/phil/ancientmedievalorientalphilosophy/Laches/chap1.html   (1783 words)

  
 Ockham on Relations
Second there are relations of non-equivalence, relations that are not simply reciprocal: if Socrates is son of Sophroniscus, there is in Sophroniscus a relation of paternity with respect to Socrates, in Socrates a relation not of paternity but of filiation with respect to Sophroniscus.
The analogy between Sophroniscus' paternity and Socrates' whiteness is complete: they both are 'of someone', it is a matter of choice which word we use to refer to them, and the words used (whiteness and William) do not refer to another being that in fact must be there.
the paternity of (belonging to) Sophroniscus - of Socrates.
www.humanities.mq.edu.au /Ockham/z3609.html   (3497 words)

  
 Medieval Theories of Singular Terms (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Socrates was called Socrates before he became a poet (or musician) and after he ceased to be the son of Sophroniscus (presumably by the latter's death).
For John Versor, a fifteenth-century thinker, ‘son of Sophroniscus’ is determinate by virtue of supposition, but ‘man with a fat head, a long nose and so on’ is determinate by virtue of circumlocution.
Just as some common terms, such as ‘sun’ and ‘moon’, in fact have only one referent, so there are referring phrases which in fact have only one referent, but do not count as singular terms because by the mode of their signification they could supposit for more than one thing.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/singular-terms-medieval   (7752 words)

  
 Socrates
He was the son of Sophroniscus and Phainarete.
Sophroniscus was a stonemason and Socrates may have also trained as a stonemason.
His circumstances, it seems, were reasonably prosperous -- he was a hoplite, or heavy infantryman, in the army and had to supply his own weapons and armor.
home.wlu.edu /~mahonj/Ancient_Philosophers/Socrates.htm   (1752 words)

  
 Socrates Introduction
Socrates son of Sophroniscus of Alopeke is among the most famousphilosophers ever.
Hisactions should also be seen as an effort to promote among his fellowcitizens a respect for philosophic wisdom and the proper use of one'sintellectual skills for spiritual betterment.
Executed for impiety and corrupting the youth (some of hisstudents had been tyrants, and others were disliked for questioningthe authority of Athenian traditions), Socrates is an inspirationuniversally for those suffering injustice.
users.cnu.edu /jvcarr/SocraBio.htm   (1635 words)

  
 Socrates Biography - Quotes
As well, many Greek scholars attributed their theories, works and sometimes even personal traits to their mentors, a tradition Pluto (a student of Socrates) had followed.
According to antiquity, Mediterranean cultural history, Socrates' father was a sculptor named Sophroniscus and his mother Phaenarete, a midwife.
Socrates married Xanthippe and had three sons; Lamprocles, Sophroniscus and Menexenus who were all young at the time of Socrates' death.
www.poemofquotes.com /quotes/s/socrates   (328 words)

  
 Socratic Learning - About Socrates
Having served with some distinction as a soldier at Delium and Amphipolis during the Peloponnesian War, Socrates dabbled in the political turmoil that consumed Athens after the War, then retired from active life to work as a stonemason and to raise his children with his wife, Xanthippe.
After inheriting a modest fortune from his father, the sculptor Sophroniscus, Socrates used his marginal financial independence as an opportunity to give full-time attention to inventing the practice of philosophical dialogue.
For the rest of his life, Socrates devoted himself to free-wheeling discussion with the aristocratic young citizens of Athens, insistently questioning their unwarranted confidence in the truth of popular opinions, even though he often offered them no clear alternative teaching.
www.socraticlearning.com /aboutSocrates.html   (367 words)

  
 The Tribune...Sunday Reading
OCRATES, (469-399 B.C.) born in Athens in the well-to-do family of Athenian sculptor Sophroniscus and midwife Phaenarete, has been an enigmatic character in the history of philosophy and literature.
He spent a lot of his time conversing with young men of promise, politicians and workmen about their callings and notions of right and wrong.
One is yet to find a better compliment than the one given by Socrates’; most devoted and learned disciple, Plato: "Thanks God I was born a Greek, not a barbarian, a free man, not a slave, a man, not a woman, and above all, I was born in the age of Socrates."
www.tribuneindia.com /1999/99jun13/sunday/head9.htm   (1446 words)

  
 All Our Yesterdays
It flourished until closed by Justinian in 529 A.D. His voluminous writings are in the form of dialogues, with his master Socrates taking the leading role.
Greek philospher, born in Athens, the son of a sculptor, SOPHRONISCUS.
In early life Socrates became a sculptor, but later he devoted himself wholly to philosophy.
www.oxleigh.freeserve.co.uk /aoy.25.htm   (591 words)

  
 [No title]
Therefore, I charge you-each and every one of you-that you can do no other than vote a verdict of 'guilty' against Socrates, son of Sophroniscus, of the tribe of Alopere.
I charge you with this because it is the only verdict that will allow Athens to maintain its devotion to justice unblemished.
And you are the son of Sophroniscus, of the tribe of Alopepe?
www2.xlibris.com /bookstore/book_excerpt.asp?bookid=27   (1651 words)

  
 Re: Rigid Designator   (Site not responding. Last check: )
So, right from the time that he came into existence, Socrates had no capacity to have been begotten by someone else instead of Sophroniscus.
If, for example, he received that name in some formal ceremony at the age of six weeks, and right up to the time of the ceremony, it still remained open what he was to be called, then he could very easily have had some other name instead.
But if he had had that name right from the first moment of his existence, then an analogue of the Sophroniscus argument would work, and Socrates could never have had any other name instead of "Socrates".
www.philo.at /phlo/199512/msg00111.html   (351 words)

  
 Socrates
Having served with some distinction as a soldier at Delium and Amphipolis during the Peloponnesian War, Socrates dabbled in the political turmoil that consumed Athens after the War, then retired from active life to work as a stonemason and to raise his children with his wife, Xanthippe.
After inheriting a modest fortune from his father, the sculptor Sophroniscus, Socrates used his marginal financial independence as an opportunity to give full-time attention to inventing the practice of philosophical dialogue.
For the rest of his life, Socrates devoted himself to free-wheeling discussion with the aristocratic young citizens of Athens, insistently questioning their unwarranted confidence in the truth of popular opinions, even though he often offered them no clear alternative teaching.
www.philosophypages.com /ph/socr.htm   (736 words)

  
 Socrates - The Mind-N-Magick Paganpedia
Due to the problems inherent in such sources, all information regarding the philosopher, Socrates, should be taken as possibly, but not definitely, true.
According to accounts from antiquity, Socrates' father was Sophroniscus, a sculptor, and his mother Phaenarete, a midwife.
He was married to Xanthippe, who bore him three sons (Lamprocles, the eldest, and Sophroniscus and Menexenus) -- all quite young at the time of Socrates' death.
paganpedia.mind-n-magick.com /wiki/index.php?title=Socrates   (3114 words)

  
 Socrates
Socrates himself was born in Athens around 470 B.C. He was the son of Sophroniscus, a sculptor, and Phaenarete, a midwife.
He was married to Xanthippe (who is often depicted as something of a shrew) and she bore him three sons, Lamprocles, Sophroniscus and Menexenus.
Socrates was hardly an ideal husband or father; he was so preoccupied with his search for wisdom that he often neglected his family and was not overly concerned with supporting them financially.
www.molloy.edu /sophia/plato/socrates.htm   (1642 words)

  
 Protagoras
Nicias and Laches are be invited to take part in the consultation.
He is a stranger to Sophroniscus, with whom he never had a difference to the hour of his death.
The possession of the art a slip, to invidious remarks.
www.findword.org /pr/protagoras.html   (424 words)

  
 Free Essays - Socrates
Socrates was born in 469 B.C. and died in 399 B.C. He was a Greek philosopher of Athens and is generally considered as one of the wisest people of all times.
He was the son of Sophroniscus, a sculptor, and Phaenarete, a midwife.
Socrates was hardly a model husband or father; he was so preoccupied with his search for wis...
www.freeessays.tv /b3508.htm   (342 words)

  
 Socrates - Crystalinks
Due to the problems inherent in such sources, all information regarding Socrates should be taken as possibly, but not definitely, true.
According to accounts from antiquity, Socrates' father was Sophroniscus, a sculptor, and his mother Phaenarete, a midwife.
He was married to Xanthippe, who bore him three sons.
www.crystalinks.com /socrates.html   (2525 words)

  
 EUTHYDEMUS by Plato, Part 12   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Not by the same father, my good man, I said, for Chaeredemus was his father, and mine was Sophroniscus.
And was Sophroniscus a father, and Chaeredemus also?
Yes, I said; the former was my father, and the latter his.
www.greekmythology.com /Books/Classic/plato/euthydemus_12.html   (744 words)

  
 SparkNotes: Laches: Part One (178a–181d)
Laches states that Socrates is "always passing his time in places where the youth have any noble study or pursuit." Nicias seconds Laches's recommendation, stating that Socrates recently supplied Nicias's own son with a music teacher of inestimable value.
At this point, Lysimachus himself realizes that the Socrates whom the other men speak of is also the son of Sophroniscus, a great friend of Lysimachus and has also been spoken about often by his son.
Laches then states that Socrates is not only a famed teacher of youth but is himself a shining example of a courageous warrior.
www.sparknotes.com /philosophy/laches/section1.html   (997 words)

  
 SFGate: Business Resource Center - Management Craft
After becoming politically involved with opponents of a democratic government in the years after the war, Socrates retired to become a stonemason, husband, and father.
It was only after his own father, Sophroniscus, left him an inheritance that Socrates had the financial security necessary to devote his life to teaching and philosophical dialogue.
The approach to philosophy espoused by Socrates was based upon four pillars: ironic modesty, the questioning of habit, a devotion to truth, and dispassionate reason.
allbusiness.sfgate.com /blog/ManagementCraft/3356/000318.html   (608 words)

  
 Plato, The MENO
Expelled by the Thirty Tyrants (including Plato's uncle and cousin), he helped Thrasybulus to bring back the Democracy.
son of Sophroniscus of the Deme Alopeke, an Athenian gadfly, about to get his comeuppance (in 399 B.C.).
He is about 68 at the time of this dialogue.
www.csun.edu /~hcfll004/meno-outline.html   (451 words)

  
 Socrates, that’s the question
It is very little source material, further complicated by the fact that Aristophanes’ account of Socrates, though contemporaneous, is in fact a satirical attack on philosophers and does not purport to be a factual account of events in the life of Socrates.
As to his private life: it seems that Socrates’; father was the sculptor Sophroniscus and his mother Phaenarete, a midwife.
Traditionally, Xanthippe is thought to have been an ill-tempered scold, a reputation she acquired mainly due to her characterization by Xenophon.
www.philipcoppens.com /socrates.html   (2821 words)

  
 Synesius: A Eulogy of Baldness 6
But we must speedily come back to our point, having obtained adequate proof that brains are there whenever hair has taken its departure, and that hair is there where brains have taken their departure.
Socrates, the son of Sophroniscus, a moderate man in other respects and beyond anyone of his associates most chary of self-praise, could not but feel pride in his resemblance to Silenus;[1] for his whole desire was in this - to prepare his head as receptacle of mind.
But like many other of the thoughts of Socrates, this also escaped the comprehension of the dull-witted, namely that he prided himself overmuch on his likeness to Silenus.
www.livius.org /su-sz/synesius/synesius_baldness_06.html   (744 words)

  
 Schulers Books (Best Russian Short Stories - 22/56)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Thus, when on dispersing after the sentence the Athenians recalled all these things of Socrates, their hearts were oppressed with heavy doubt.
But then the good Athenians looked upon the harbour and the sea, and in the red glow of the dying day they saw the purple sails of the sharp-keeled ship, sent to the Delian festival, shimmering in the distance on the blue Pontus.
Supposing the son of Sophroniscus had been unjustly condemned, who would hinder his escaping from the prison, especially since he had numerous friends to help him?
www.schulers.com /books/stories/Best_Russian_Short_Stories/Best_Russian_Short_Stories22.htm   (1524 words)

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