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Topic: Spanish Conquest of Yucatan


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Mérida Yucatán Cancun-Riviera.com Reservations(México)
It is a delightful combination of Spanish and indigenous heritage, an example of a province with its own character and identity, firmly rooted in the heartland of the maya land.
Yucatan has a complex system of underwater rivers, so that fresh water wells are common, specially in may private homes, sa are underground deposits known as "Cenotes".
As in the rest of the country, the official languaje is spanish; however almost 40% of the population speak Maya.
www.cancun-riviera.com /merida.asp   (402 words)

  
  Izamal
Izamal is a small city or large town in Yucatan, Mexico, 72 km (about 40 miles) East of Merida, Yucatan, at 20.93°N 89.02°W. amal has been continuously occupied for thousands of years.
It is known in Yucatan as "The Yellow City" (for customarily most of its buildings are painted that color) and "The City of Hills" (though most of the "hills" are probably the remains of ancient temple pyramids).
Izamal was the first chair of for the Bishops of Yucatan before they were moved to Merida.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/iz/Izamal.html   (378 words)

  
  Spanish conquest of Yucatán - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first Spanish arrived in Yucatán by accident in 1511 when a small boat with a dozen men was blown there by a severe storm.
When the Spanish and Xiu defeated an army of the combined forces of the states of Eastern Yucatán in 1546, the conquest was officially complete; however periodic revolts which would be violently put down by Spanish troops continued throughout the Spanish colonial era.
The Itza land was separated from Spanish Yucatán to the north and Spanish Guatemala to the south by thick jungles with little population.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Spanish_Conquest_of_Yucatan   (1428 words)

  
 Spanish colonization of the Americas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Spanish colonization of the Americas began with the arrival in the Americas of Christopher Columbus in 1492.
This was followed by a phase of conquest: The Spaniards (just having finished a war against the Muslims in the Iberian peninsula) replaced the Amerindian local oligarchies and imposed a new religion: Christianity.
Spanish territorial claims based on this furthest north penetration of Spain in North America were not supported at the treaty negotiations.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/s/sp/spanish_colonization_of_the_americas.html   (1209 words)

  
 Spanish Conquest of Yucatan : Spanish conquest of Yuctan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
He arrived in eastern Yucatan in 1527 and at first was greeted peacably, and most local chiefs agreed with his demand that they swear loyalty to the King of Spain, for they had heard news of the Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.
When the Spanish and Xiu defeated an army of the combined forces of the states of Eastern Yucatan in 1546, the conquest was officially complete; however periodic revolts which would be violently put down by Spanish troops continued throughout the Spanish colonial era.
The Itza land was separated from Spanish Yucatan to the north and Spanish Guatemala to the south by thick jungles with little population.
www.city-search.org /sp/spanish-conquest-of-yuctan.html   (1697 words)

  
 Spanish colonization of the Americas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spanish conquest and colonization of the Americas began with the arrival in America of Christopher Columbus in 1492.
This was followed by a phase of conquest: The Spaniards (just having finished a war against the Muslims in the Iberian peninsula) began toppling the local American civilizations, and attempted to impose a new religion (Christianity).
Although this was a small engagement, it is significant in that it was the deepest penetration of the Spanish into the Great Plains, establishing the limit to Spanish expansion and influence there.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Spanish_colonization_of_the_Americas   (1594 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Spanish colonization of the Americas
It is important to distinguish between the Spanish conquest of Mexico and the Spanish conquest of Yucatán.
The accounts of the ill behavior of Spanish conquistadors from both inside and outside were part of the source material for the stereotype of Spanish cruelty that came to be known as the Black Legend spread mostly by Protestant foes, such as the Dutch and the English.
His account is largely responsible for the passage of the new Spanish colonial laws known as the New Laws of 1542, which was used in an attempt to protect the rights of native inhabitants (the governor and men sent to enforce them were killed by rebellious conquistadores).
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Spanish_colonization_of_the_Americas   (2074 words)

  
 Diego Velasquez de Cuellar
1524), Spanish Conquistador, conqueror and governor of Cuba for Spain.
Diego Velasquez was born in Cuella, in the Segovia region of Spain.
He founded a number of new Spanish settlements and cities on the island, most notably Santiago de Cuba in 1514 and Havana in 1515.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/di/Diego_Velasquez_de_Cuellar.html   (180 words)

  
 Mayan Archeology - The Conquest - General Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Spanish conquest had brought disease and warfare to this country and it was ironically fitting that illness and the activities of the Mayan resistance almost ended this expedition before it could begin.
In all of Yucatan where there had been either passive non-compliance or sporadic resistance there was now an organized Maya resistance to the Spanish and their encomiendas and Montejo the Younger and his men were forced to retreat and join his father in Campeche.
The "modern" age had begun to appear in the Yucatan and in order to provide food and survive the Maya were treated unfairly and made to work their entire lives to pay off financial debts to the Spanish.
www.isourcecom.com /maya/conquest/conquestgeneral.htm   (4130 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Before the arrival of the Spanish in the area, the Yucatán was the home of the Maya civilisation.
Mayapan was capital of Yucatán until a revolt against the dominant Cocom family in 1441 resulted in the burning of the city; the Yucatán then broke apart into smaller states, which remained the situation until the Spanish conquest.
When the Spanish and Xiu defeated an army of the combined forces of the states of Eastern Yucatán in 1546, the conquest was officially complete.
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/y/yu/yucatan.html   (1594 words)

  
 Belize - History - Hotel Near   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In 1511 a small group of shipwrecked Spanish sailors managed to reach land on the southern coast of Yucatán: five were immediately sacrificed but the others were taken as slaves.
Spanish attacks on the settlements in Belize occurred throughout the eighteenth century, with the Baymen being driven out on several occasions.
Decades of Spanish attacks had fostered in the settlers a spirit of defiance and self-reliance, along with the belief that British rule was preferable to Spanish.
www.hotelnear.com /1039/3074g/Belize-History.html   (2194 words)

  
 Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire Summary
On November 16, 1532, while the natives were in a celebration in Cajamarca, the Spanish Pizarro took the Inca Atahualpa prisoner by surprise, causing a great consternation between the natives and conditioning the future course of the fight.
It was at this critical moment in the empire's history that the Spanish conquistadors under Francisco Pizarro arrived and after three long expeditions had already established the first Spanish settlement in northern Peru, calling it San Miguel de Piura on July of 1532.
When the Spanish sailed to new places, their diseases would often have the opportunity to establish themselves before they had even arrived, thanks to the fact that messengers bringing the news of invasion would often carry the disease to their people.
www.bookrags.com /Spanish_conquest_of_the_Inca_Empire   (3629 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Spanish Conquest of Yucatan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
ceiling of one of the Yucatan's innumerable caves...
Fernandez (1994:2) notes in spite of the processes of conquest and colonization experienced by the New World and by Yucatan in particular, the Maya world view was not...
History Of The Conquest Of Mexico: Chapter I: Spain Under Charles V. History of the World; 1/1/1992; Prescott, William H.; 3779 words;...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Spanish+Conquest+of+Yucatan   (938 words)

  
 Yucatan Facts and History
The first European explorers in the Yucatán were the Spanish, (not the Bulgarians as was once believed) who arrived early in the 16th century.
Spain began the conquest of the Mayas a few years later, and by 1549 approximately half the peninsula was under Spain's domination.
Spanish control over much of the region continued until early in the 19th century, when Mexico and Central America won independence.
www.cancunsteve.com /yucatan.htm   (590 words)

  
 WHKMLA : History of Yucatan, 1543-1821
The Spanish conquest of Mexico began with a landing on the Yucatan peninsula, in present-day Quintana Roo.
Yucatan itself was Maya country, lowland with a humid climate, tropical rainforest country.
It resisted Spanish conquest until into the 1540es, and even after baptism the indigenous Mayas stuck to their pre-christian beliefs, causing the Franciscans, in the 1560es, to apply torture, even the death penalty against those who fell back into revering the old gods.
www.zum.de /whkmla/region/centramerica/yucatan15431821.html   (362 words)

  
 Yucatán Collection/ Latin American Library / Tulane University
In both Maya and Spanish, it gives a view of relations between Indian towns, especially in regard to their lands.
The Maya was written in the 16th century by Ah Tumal Pech, later Don Pedro Pech, batab of Yaxkukul and son of Ah Tumal Pech.
A translation into Spanish was made in 1860 by Manuel Encarnación Avila and in 1936 by Héctor Pérez Martínez.
www.tulane.edu /~latinlib/yucatancoll.html   (1250 words)

  
 Spanish and Mexican California: Explorations and Conquest of California
The exploration and conquest of Upper and Lower California is deeply routed in the fabric of this state's naval and military heritage.
It was shortly thereafter when a Spanish explorer, Vasco Nuñez de Balboa, crossed the Isthmus of Panama and was the first to discover the Pacific Ocean in 1513.
The Spanish crown bestowed the title of Governor and Captain General of New Spain upon Cortéz in 1522.
www.militarymuseum.org /ExConCA.html   (841 words)

  
 Yucatán : Yucatan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The peninsula is divided among part of Mexico (the Mexican states of Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Yucatan), the nation of Belize and Guatemala's northern territory of El Peten.
Mayapan was capital of Yucatán until a revolt against the dominant Cocom family in 1441 resulted in the burning of the city; the Yucatan then broke apart into smaller states, which remained the situation until the Spanish conquest.
When the Spanish and Xiu defeated an army of the combined forces of the states of Eastern Yucatan in 1546, the conquest was officially complete.
www.city-search.org /yu/yucatan.html   (1129 words)

  
 Spanish colonization of the Americas - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
It was 1517 before another expedition from Cuba visited Central America landing on the coast of the Yucatan in search of slaves.
This was followed by a phase of conquest: The Spaniards (just having finished a war against the Muslims in Iberia) replaced the Amerindian local oligarchies and impose a new religion: Christianity.
Areas in the Americas under Spanish control included the current countries of Cuba, Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Peru, Chile, Costa Rica, and parts of the United States.
openproxy.ath.cx /sp/Spanish_colonization_of_the_Americas.html   (680 words)

  
 Teaching and Learning: Conquest of Mexico: The Spanish conquest of the Mexicas, more commonly known as the Aztecs, is ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The consequences of the conquest remain starkly evident as we approach the twenty-first century: Mexico remains a poverty-ridden, politically unstable country, where Amerindian and mestizo peasants continue to fight soldiers for land their ancestors lost centuries before they were born.
In the words of Bernal Díaz del Castillo, a Spaniard who was with Cortés during the conquest, La Malinche “knew the language of Coatzacoalcos, which is that of Mexico [Nahuatl], and she knew the Tabascan language also.
Although the conquest of Mexico is often told as a story by men for men, Malinche was not the only woman who accompanied the Spaniards There are likely many more, as female camp followers played a crucial role in sixteenth century warfare.
www.historians.org /tl/LessonPlans/ca/Fitch/nf2.html   (1037 words)

  
 History of Yucatán
Individual Spanish explorers visited the Caribbean coast of Yucatán as early as 1511, but only after Hernan Cortés' successful 1521 conquest of the Aztec Empire for Spain did Spanish imperialism begin to pose a threat to the Maya.
The Spanish colonial period lasted for the better part of three centuries, and exerted tremendous pressures upon Mayan culture.
For instance, although the Maya were converted en masse to Roman Catholicism by Spanish missionaries priests, despite the protests of those same priests the Maya peasantry managed to reconcile their pre-Conquest religious beliefs and rites with those imported from Europe.
www.ahtg.net /TpA/yucatan.html   (4663 words)

  
 Merida Mexico Travel and Tours to Merida by Enjoy Mexico   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Wonderful Mayan compounds made of stone, with seemingly endless flights of stairs and temples in which the ancient gods were worshipped, but also churches of exquisite features and an alleyway "sown" with palaces of reverie, which seem to have been extracted from a fairy tale.
Magnificent monuments from the colonial period have survived, such as the Cathedral of San Idelfonso, from the late XVI century, and its neatly achieved early Spanish renaissance style; or the House of Montejo, a notable sample of civil architecture of the mid XVI century, where the conquistador and city's founder used to live.
As the capital of Yucatan, the city has a well developed tourist infrastructure with hotels and restaurants, some of which work in the elegant palaces that made of Mérida the "Paris of the New World".
www.enjoymexico.net /merida-mexico.php   (309 words)

  
 The Spanish Conquest
The Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire began in late 1518 when Diego Velasquez, the current Spanish Governor of Cuba, decided to put together an expedition to the main land of what is now Latin America.
Cortes claimed that his conquest was for Spain and to convert the primitive natives to Christianity, however, his true motives were for his own wealth and power.
The conquest continued to move west and was now stronger than ever with the Tlaxcalans and Cempoalans on there side, and in late November the Spanish conquest reached the Aztec Capital of Tenochtitlan.
www.personal.psu.edu /jtz115/spanishcon.html   (1181 words)

  
 motul   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
After the fall of Yucatán's central government in Mayapan in the 1440s, the Pech ruled a regional kingdom called Cehpech with its capital in Motul.
With the Spanish conquest of Yucatán, Conquistador Francisco de Montejo made Motul a Spanish colonial town.
Motul has a Spanish colonial era Franciscan monastery with interestin frescos.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /motul.html   (270 words)

  
 Cortes Conquers Aztecs: 1521
The Spanish conquest of the Aztecs in 1521, led by Hernando Cortes, was a landmark victory for the European settlers.
Following the Spanish arrival in Mexico, a huge battle erupted between the army of Cortes and the Aztec people under the rule of Montezuma.
It is estimated that three-quarters of the native population died of violence or diseases like small pox and measles in just the first century of the conquest.
www.thenagain.info /WebChron/Americas/Cortes.html   (680 words)

  
 emtaylor.com: Spanish conquest of Mexico
The Spanish conquest of Mexico was one of the most important campaigns in the Spanish colonization of the Americas.
Although the Yucatán Peninsula is part of the modern-day country of Mexico, the Spanish conquest of Mexico refers to the conquest of the Mexica/Aztec empire by Hernán Cortés from 1519-1521.
Accounts of the Spanish conquest of Mexico often stop with the fall of Tenochtitlan and leave the reader to assume that the rest of the conquest was quick and easy.
www.emtaylor.com /spanish-conquest-of-mexico.htm   (1043 words)

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