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Topic: Specific heat capacity


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  Heat - Heat and energy
The specific heat capacity of a substance is defined as:
The heat capacity of a body is obtained by multiplying its specific heat capacity by its mass in kilograms.
In this case, the heat capacity of the wrestler is:
www.physchem.co.za /Heat/Specific.htm   (369 words)

  
 Specific Heats
On this slide we derive some equations which relate the heat capacity of a gas to the gas constant used in the equation of state.
From our studies of heat transfer, we know that the amount of heat transferred between two objects is proportional to the temperature difference between the objects and the heat capacity of the objects.
The specific heat constants for constant pressure and constant volume processes are related to the gas constant for a given gas.
www.grc.nasa.gov /WWW/K-12/airplane/specheat.html   (909 words)

  
  Calorimetry: Specific Heat Capacity of Copper   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The heat capacity of the calorimeter must be obtained from a separate calibration experiment (for example, a heating element can be used to introduce a known amount of heat).
Determine the heat capacity of the calorimeter using a metal of known specific heat capacity.
Once the heat capacity of the calorimeter has been determined, it is possible to experimentally determine the specific heat capacity of copper.
www.chm.davidson.edu /ChemistryApplets/calorimetry/SpecificHeatCapacityOfCopper.html   (449 words)

  
  Specific Heat
The specific heat is the amount of heat per unit mass required to raise the temperature by one degree Celsius.
The specific heat per gram for water is much higher than that for a metal, as described in the water-metal example.
The molar specific heats of most solids at room temperature and above are nearly constant, in agreement with the Law of Dulong and Petit.
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/thermo/spht.html   (319 words)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Specific heat capacity
Specific heat capacity is the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample.
Because the internal energy curve is normally almost linear, it can by approximated by measuring the heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kg of a substance by 1°C (or one Kelvin).
If a fluid has stronger intermolecular forces (such as hydrogen bonding in water) then the heat capacity is likely to be higher.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/sp/Specific_heat_capacity   (151 words)

  
  Specific heat capacity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The specific heat capacity (the symbol c or s, also called specific heat or SHC) of a substance is defined as heat capacity per unit mass.
Heat capacity can be measured by using calorimetry.
The equivalent definition using cgs units is the amount of energy (measured in ergs) required to raise the temperature of one gram of the substance by one degree Celsius (erg/(g·°C)).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Specific_heat_capacity   (606 words)

  
 Specific heat capacity article - Specific heat capacity heat Joules temperature kilogram Kelvin unit heat capacity mass ...
The specific heat capacity (abbreviated C, also called specific heat) of a substance is defined as the amount of heat energy (measured in Joules) required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of the substance by one Kelvin.
The equivalent definition using cgs units is the amount of heat energy (measured in ergs) required to raise the temperature of one gram of the substance by one degree Celsius.
An approximation is possible because measuring the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample, is normally almost linear.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Specific_heat_capacity   (239 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Specific heat capacity
The specific heat capacity (symbol c or s, also called specific heat) of a substance is defined as heat capacity per unit mass.
The SI unit for specific heat capacity is the joule per kilogram kelvin, the amount of heat energy (measured in joules) required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of the substance by one kelvin.
The equivalent definition using cgs units is the amount of heat energy (measured in ergs) required to raise the temperature of one gram of the substance by one degree Celsius (erg/(g·°C)).
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Molar_specific_heat   (340 words)

  
 Heat capacity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Heat capacity (usually denoted by a capital C, often with subscripts) is a measurable physical quantity that characterizes the ability of a body to store heat as it changes in temperature.
The dimensionless heat capacity divided by three, as a function of temperature as predicted by the Debye model and by Einstein's earlier model.
One of the strengths of the Debye model is that (unlike the preceding Einstein model) it predicts an approach of heat capacity toward zero as zero temperature is approached, and also predicts the proper mathematical form of the this approach.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Heat_capacity   (1967 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Specific heat capacity
In thermodynamics, the specific heat capacity of a substance is the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample.
Because the internal energy curve is normally almost linear, it can be approximated by measuring the heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kg of a substance by 1 °C (or one kelvin).
Related concepts are specific melting heat and specific heat of vaporisation, see also Phase (matter), Heat#Changes of state, Latent heat.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/s/sp/specific_heat_capacity.html   (192 words)

  
 Heat capacity Summary
Heat capacity, being the quantity of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by 1°C, is clearly dependent upon the amount of substance undergoing the temperature change.
Heat capacity (usually denoted by a capital C, often with subscripts) is a measurable physical quantity that characterizes the ability of a body to store heat as it changes in temperature.
The dimensionless heat capacity divided by three, as a function of temperature as predicted by the Debye model and by Einstein's earlier model.
www.bookrags.com /Heat_capacity   (2660 words)

  
 Calorimeter and method for simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and specific heat of fluids - Patent 5988875
By limiting their measurements to a narrow range of fluids, with heat capacities near that of the dilute lipid dispersions, and with similar diffusivities, they were able to circumvent approximating the effect of.lambda., which in principle may change independently of heat capacity.
is the thermal conductivity of the sample, C is the volume heat capacity of the sample, T is the temperature of the measurement,.lambda..sub.ref and C.sub.ref are the thermal conductivity and volume heat capacity of the reference solution and x,y,z represent the instrument's physical dimensions.
Another indication of precision of the simultaneous heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurement is the orthogonality of sensitivity vectors associated with the discrete parameters {p.sub.n } The magnitude of the sensitivity vector is simply the sensitivity indicator; the directions of the sensitivity vectors is an indication of the independence of the discrete parameters.
www.freepatentsonline.com /5988875.html   (5255 words)

  
 Brainboost - what is the specific heat capacity of a substance   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The specific heat capacity of a substance is defined as heat capacity per unit mass.
The specific heat capacity of a substance is the heat capacity per unit of mass, measured in joules per kilogram per kelvin (J kg 1 K 1).
When the specific heat capacity of a substance is measured in terms of mass, the atomic or molecular weight of the substance has a significant effect upon the value.
www.brainboost.com /search.asp?Q=what+is+the+specific+heat+capacity+of+a+substance&lfmq=1   (127 words)

  
 Specific heat capacity
The specific heat capacity (abbreviated s, also called specific heat) of a substance is defined as the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of the substance by one Kelvin (equivalently one degree Celsius).
Specific heat capacity is therefore heat capacity per unit mass.
An approximation is possible because measuring the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample, is normally almost linear.
www.knowledgefun.com /book/s/sp/specific_heat_capacity.html   (187 words)

  
 Heat
The specific heat capacity c is the amount of energy it takes to raise the temperature of one kg of material by 1 degree Kelvin or Celsius.
The exact specific heat capacity of a substance depends on the condition under which it is measured.
For gases, the specific heat capacity measured at constant volume is different from the specific heat capacity measured at constant pressure.
electron9.phys.utk.edu /phys136d/modules/m3/Heat.htm   (1910 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Specific heat capacity, also known simply as specific heat (Symbol: C or c) is the measure of the heat energy required to raise the temperature of a given amount of a substance by one degree.
Specific heat is an intensive quantity, meaning it is a property of the material itself, and not the size or shape of the sample.
Molar mass: When the specific heat capacity, c, of a material is measured (lowercase c means the unit quantity is in terms of mass), different values arise because different substances have different molar masses (essentially, the weight of the individual atoms or molecules).
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=specific_heat_capacity   (1407 words)

  
 Physics 20: Specific Heat Capacity and Latent Heat
Specific heat capacity is the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit of mass of a substance by a unit change in temperature.
T is the change in temperature in °C or K. The derived unit for c, the specific heat capacity, is J/(kg°C) The specific heat capacity of a substance depends on its molecular structure and on its phase.
The specific latent heat of a substance is the quantity of heat energy required to change the state of a unit mass of a substance.
www.sasked.gov.sk.ca /docs/physics/u4b2phy.html   (872 words)

  
 [No title]
Specific heat capacity is the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample.
For any particular substance, its Specific Heat Capacity is the measure of the quantity of (heat) energy needed to raise the temperature of a unit quantity of the substance through 1degree of temperature.
suggest that this negative change in the heat capacity in the case of IFABP is due mostly to the loss of internal hydrogen bonds of waters found in the cavity that are displaced by the ligand (Kirk et al., 1996).
lycos.cs.cmu.edu /info/specific-heat-capacity.html   (488 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - heat capacity (Physics) - Encyclopedia
heat capacity or thermal capacity, ratio of the change in heat energy of a unit mass of a substance to the change in temperature of the substance; like its melting point or boiling point, the heat capacity is a characteristic of a substance.
In the metric system, heat capacity is often expressed in units of calories per gram per degree Celsius (cal/g-°C); in the English system, British thermal units per pound per degree Fahrenheit (Btu/lb-°F) are often used.
kilowatt-hours/g-°C. The heat capacity of a system such as a calorimeter refers to the ratio of the change in heat energy of the system as a whole to the change in its temperature and is expressed in such units as calories per degree Celsius.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/H/heatcapa.html   (279 words)

  
 Specific heat capacity - Wikipedia
Specific heat capacity is the slope (derivative) of the internal energy due to random motion of atoms in a sample as a function of temperature, normalized by dividing by the mass of the sample.
Because the internal energy curve is normally almost linear, it can by approximated by measuring the heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kg of a substance by 1°C (or one Kelvin).
For example, measuring the heat capacity of water produces different results if you start at 20°C, or 60°C. Inter-molecular forces.
wikipedia.findthelinks.com /sp/Specific_heat_capacity.html   (135 words)

  
 Heat Capacity   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The heat capacity of an object is the ratio of the amount of heat transferred to an object to the rise in temperature of an object.
Because water's heat capacity is large, it doesn't change temperature much upon absorbing large amounts of heat energy from the sun when compared to the temperature change predicted for air.
Note that the specific heat of water is more than 4 times that of an equal quantity (by mass) of air {realize, of course, that these are not equal volumes of water and air}.
hendrix.uoregon.edu /~stanm/phys162s2003/PHYS162/Heat_Capacity.html   (291 words)

  
 Search: Specific Heat Capacity Table Ice
The "heat capacity" (C) of an object is the ratio of change in heat to change in temperature, and the "specific heat" (c) of a substance is the heat...
The specific heat capacity of a substance is defined as:...
Specific heat capacity at constant pressure of ice, water and steam.
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