Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Standard Cantonese


Related Topics

In the News (Wed 22 Nov 17)

  
  Chinese language - The Encyclopedia
The standardized form of spoken Chinese is based on the Beijing dialect, a member of the Mandarin group; it is described in the article “Standard Mandarin”.
Standard Mandarin is the official language of the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan, as well as one of four official languages of Singapore.
Spoken in the form of Standard Cantonese, Chinese is one of the official languages of Hong Kong (together with English) and of Macau (together with Portuguese).
www.the-encyclopedia.com /description/Chinese_language   (5735 words)

  
 Cantonese
The origins of Cantonese (also known as Yue) are not known due to absence of reliable historical records, however, it is generally agreed that Cantonese had acquired linguistics traits distinguishing it from other Chinese dialects by the time of the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD).
Cantonese is a tonal language which means that the meaning of words is affected by the pitch with which they are spoken.
Cantonese is considered to be a Category III language in terms of difficulty for speakers of English.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/may/Cantonese.html   (919 words)

  
 Cantonese language, pronunciation and special characters
Cantonese is spoken by about 66 million people mainly in the south east of China, particularly in Hong Kong, Macau, Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan.
Cantonese is also the main language of business, the media and government in both Hong Kong and Macau.
Cantonese, Dungan, Gan, Hakka, Mandarin, Shanghainese, Taiwanese, Teochew, Xiang
www.omniglot.com /writing/cantonese.htm   (517 words)

  
 Standard Cantonese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Standard Cantonese is also known popularly as Guangdong speech (Traditional Chinese: 廣東話, Simplified Chinese: 广东话 Jyutping: Gwong2dong1 Wa2; Mandarin: Guǎngdōng huà) or as the Canton Prefecture speech (Traditional Chinese: 廣州話、廣府話, Simplified Chinese: 广州话、广府话; Jyutping: Gwong2zau1 Wa2, Gwong2fu2 Wa2; Mandarin: Guǎngzhōu huà, Guángfǔ huà).
Standard Cantonese has nine tones in six distinct tone contours.
Spoken vernacular Cantonese differs from modern written Chinese, which is essentially formal Standard Mandarin in written form.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Standard_Cantonese   (3004 words)

  
 ooBdoo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Hanyu Pinyin was adopted in 1979 by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as the standard romanization for modern Chinese (ISO-7098:1991).
The primary purpose of pinyin in Chinese schools is to teach Standard Mandarin pronunciation.
For speakers of other Chinese spoken variants who do not speak Standard Mandarin, pinyin is unsuitable for use in reading and writing because these sounds do not correspond to their speech.
www.oobdoo.com /wikipedia/?title=Pinyin   (4464 words)

  
 Chinese language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The Chinese language, spoken in the form of Standard Mandarin, is the official language of the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan, as well as one of four official languages of Singapore, and one of six official languages of the United Nations.
Standard Mandarin is based on the Beijing dialect, which is the dialect of Mandarin as spoken in Beijing, and the governments intend for speakers of all Chinese speech varieties to use it as a common language of communication.
Cantonese is unique among non-Mandarin regional languages in having a widely used written colloquial standard with a large number of unofficial characters for words particular to this variety of Chinese.
chinese-language.mindbit.com   (5872 words)

  
 Cantonese (linguistics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cantonese is one of the major dialect groups or languages of the Chinese language or language family.
Although Standard Mandarin (Putonghua/guoyu) is the standard and official language in mainland China and Taiwan and is spoken by nearly everyone in addition to their native local dialects (which includes Cantonese in Guangdong), Cantonese is one of the main languages in many overseas Chinese communities including Hong Kong, South-east Asia, North America, and Europe.
Cantonese is generally considered to have 6 or 7 tones, the choice depending on whether a traditional distinction between a high-level and a high-falling tone is observed; the two tones in question have largely merged into a single, high-level tone, especially in Hong Kong Cantonese.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cantonese_(linguistics)   (3143 words)

  
 Most diverse tonal language - China History Forum, chinese history forum
I suppose the shanghai dialect is the representative "standard" dialect for wu ?
Standard cantonese is based on guangzhou dialect but I don't think there is any difference between the hong kong pure version versus the guangzhou version.
Cantonese with 19 - 21 initials (depending on area), 54 finals and 9 tones, has over 5000 unique syllables unlike the oversimplified Mandarin dialect which has 26 initials, 36 finals and 4 tones (some places have as little as 2 tones) which has around 1200 syllables.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /index.php?showtopic=4225   (2023 words)

  
 Virtual Office PA & Business translation services
The primary differences between the two are that Standard Urdū is written in Nastaliq script and draws heavily on Persian and Arabic vocabulary, while standard Hindi is written in Devanāgarī and has supplemented some of its Persian and Arabic vocabulary with words from Sanskrit.
The standardized form of spoken Chinese is based on the Beijing dialect, a member of the Mandarin group.
Standard Italian was strongly influenced by the Tuscan dialect and is somewhat intermediate between Italo-Dalmatian languages of the South and Gallo-Italian languages of the North.
www.b2basics.co.uk   (3433 words)

  
 Chinese language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
In the sense that the written language is based on Standard Mandarin and the dialects are mostly spoken but not written, the situation in China is a complex and interesting case of diglossia.
In China, a single cultural and literary standard (Classical Chinese and later, Vernacular Chinese) continued to exist while the spoken language continued to diverge between different cities and counties, much as European languages diverged, due to the scale of the country, and the obstruction of communication by geography.
In China, standardization of spoken dialects was weaker, and mostly due to cultural influence.
members.tripod.com /taiwanweb/chat.html   (5768 words)

  
 Chinese language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Standard Mandarin is the official standard language used by the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China, and Singapore.
This is partly because all speakers of different varieties of Chinese use one formal standard written language, although this written language in modern times is itself based on one variety of spoken Chinese.
Cantonese is unique among non-Mandarin regional languages in having a written colloquial standard, used in Hong Kong and by non-Standard Mandarin speaking Cantonese speakers overseas, with a large number of unofficial characters for words particular to this variety of Chinese.
www.higiena-system.com /wiki/link-Chinese_language   (6320 words)

  
 Mandarin and Cantonese - How far apart? | Antimoon Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Colloquial Cantonese is written with a mixture of standard Chinese characters and hundreds of extra characters invented specifically for Cantonese.
Cantonese and Mandarin are not mutually intelligible although they are still close enough that their speakers would recognize occasional words and phrases in each other's languages.
Cantonese is much closer to classical Chinese, and in that sense it most certainly was NOT written first in the 19th century -- try the 6th.
www.antimoon.com /forum/t2316.htm   (935 words)

  
 Chinese Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Not only do they greatly differ in pronunciation, but there is about a 25% to 50% difference in their grammar and vocabulary, a difference notable enough to raise a doubt as to whether all Chinese dialects come from the same language family.
Spoken in the form of Standard Cantonese, Chinese is one of the official languages of Hong Kong (together with English) and of Macau (together with Portuguese) and is a spoken language in Singapore (together with Mandarin, English, Bahasa Melayu (i.e.
Among Chinese diaspora, Cantonese is the most common language one can hear in Chinatowns, thanks to early immigrants from Southern China.
www.cheappimsleur.com /chinese_language   (531 words)

  
 White Song FAQ about Mandarin vs. Cantonese and Chinese Translation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Standard written Chinese is understandable to all Chinese dialects.
A Cantonese speaker can understand the Mandarin speaker's Chinese translation because the translation is in standard written Chinese.
Under these circumstances, the written Chinese translated by the Cantonese speaker will not be understandable to a Mandarin speaker, or to other Chinese with other dialects.
www.whitesong.com /english/faq_mandarin_cantonese_english.htm   (330 words)

  
 Sorting It All Out : The Cantonese IME (not for input of characters from Canton, Ohio)
Cantonese is usually referred to as a spoken variant, and not as a written variant.
With the advent of the computer and standardization of character sets specifically for Cantonese, many printed materials in predominantly Cantonese spoken areas of the world are written to cater to their population with these written Cantonese characters.
There are even differences between Standard Chinese and vernacular Mandarin, but the differences are not as dramatic as in Cantonese depending on which type of cantonese yo are using at the moment.
blogs.msdn.com /michkap/archive/2006/07/27/679538.aspx   (1808 words)

  
 languagehat.com: Comment on CANTONESE LOSING OUT IN L.A.
The disappearance of Cantonese would be a terrible tragedy, but I suspect that it will always be vibrant thanks to its population base in Hong Kong and Guangdong, not to mention the prolific Cantonese film industry.
A Cantonese coworker once told me that her non-Cantonese Chinese husband could read the news section of San Francisco Chinese newspapers but not the entertainment section, as the entertainment section was written in colloquial Cantonese.
The real dialects are Cantonese Mandarin, Hokkien Mandarin, etc. For example, in Taiwan shi and si are not differentiated by most speakers, which causes occasional problems and probably changes use of vocabulary somewhat.
www.languagehat.com /mt/mt-comments.cgi?entry_id=2239   (2434 words)

  
 Kent's Tai Chi Center - Notes on the Chinese found on this site
It is of utmost importance to have a standard orthography when writing another language in your native alphabet.
Thus, Cantonese standard orthographies are being brought forth, and a formal grammatical system is being put together.
In the meantime, many Cantonese speakers are using their own personal (logical) orthographies, thus causing massive confusion as to how to spell and pronounce Cantonese words, written in the Roman alphabet.
www.kentstaichi.com /chinese.html   (599 words)

  
 Chinese www.Chinese101.com
Regional variation between different variants/dialects is comparable to the Romance language family; many variants of spoken Chinese are different enough to be mutually incomprehensible.
There are between six and twelve main regional groups (depending on classification scheme), of which the most populous are Mandarin, Wu, and Cantonese, in that order.
Standard Mandarin is the official language of the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan, as well as one of four official languages of Singapore (together with English, Malay, and Tamil).
chinese101.com   (488 words)

  
 Quality-Driven Chinese Learning Software, Chinese Electronic Dictionaries, tools to Learn Chinese</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> Toishanese, though the term is also used to refer to just the <b>Standard</b> <b>Cantonese</b> of <a href="/topics/Guangzhou" title="Guangzhou" class=fl>Guangzhou</a> and Hong Kong. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Cantonese</b> characters are often used for formal occasions, within the PRC a character set closer to <a href="/topics/Mandarin-%28linguistics%29" title="Mandarin %28linguistics%29" class=fl>Mandarin</a> tends </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> <b>Standard</b> <a href="/topics/Mandarin-%28linguistics%29" title="Mandarin %28linguistics%29" class=fl>Mandarin</a> will be the only form of speech that everyone understands.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.firstmandarin.com /Articles.html</font>   (1624 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><body face="Arial"> <br> <table cellpadding=0> <tr> <td>  </td> <td> <table > <tr><td> </td><td colspan=2><u>Everything your english teacher told you was wrong! | Antimoon Forum</u>   <i>(Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)</i></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> As for whether <b>Cantonese</b> is considered a <a href="/topics/Dialect" title="Dialect" class=fl>dialect</a> of Chinese, that is only by non-linguists, as from a linguistic standpoint <b>Cantonese</b> is a language, and Chinese is a language *group*. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> The <b>standard</b> language is just one <a href="/topics/Dialect" title="Dialect" class=fl>dialect</a> of the language, and as any <a href="/topics/Dialect" title="Dialect" class=fl>dialect</a> it does not have sharply defined boundaries as to what is acceptable and what is not in it. </td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> This is much like the use of <a href="/topics/Chinese-written-language" title="Chinese written language" class=fl>written</a> <b>standard</b> Hochdeutsch in German-speaking areas of Switzerland today, where the primary <a href="/topics/Chinese-written-language" title="Chinese written language" class=fl>written</a> language is <b>standard</b> Hochdeutsch, and Swiss German <a href="/topics/Dialect" title="Dialect" class=fl>dialects</a> are not used in formal writing, even though in most non-formal contexts primarily Swiss German <a href="/topics/Dialect" title="Dialect" class=fl>dialects</a> are actually <a href="/topics/Spoken-Chinese" title="Spoken Chinese" class=fl>spoken</a>.</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>www.antimoon.com /forum/t222-45.htm</font>   (2078 words)</td></tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table><script language="JavaScript"> <!-- // This function displays the ad results. // It must be defined above the script that calls show_ads.js // to guarantee that it is defined when show_ads.js makes the call-back. function google_ad_request_done(google_ads) { // Proceed only if we have ads to display! if (google_ads.length < 1 ) return; var s = ''; // For text ads, display each ad in turn. // In this example, each ad goes in a new row in the table. if (google_ads[0].type == 'text') { for(i = 0; i < 1; ++i) { s = '<body face="Arial"><br><table cellpadding=0><tr><td>  </td><td><table ><tr><td> </td><td colspan=2>' + '<a href="' + google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '">' + google_ads[i].line1 + '</a>  <span style="font-size:10pt">'; if (google_info.feedback_url) { s += '<a href="' + google_info.feedback_url + '" style="color:#7070F0;text-decoration:none">(Ads by Google)</a>'; } else { s += '(Ads by Google)'; } s += '</span></td></tr>' + '<tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td>' + '<a href="' + google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '" style="text-decoration:none;">' + google_ads[i].line2 + ' ' + google_ads[i].line3 + '</a></td></tr>' + '<tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray>' + '<a href="' + google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '" style="text-decoration:none; color:gray;">' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '</a></font></td></tr></table></td></tr></table>'; d = document.getElementById('ad' + (i + 1)); d.innerHTML = s; d.style.display = 'block'; } s = ''; for(i = 1; i < google_ads.length; i++) { s += '<div class="r" style="margin-left: 14px"><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0><tr>' + // '<td valign=top><img src="/images/a.gif"/ style="padding-top: 3px; padding-right: 3px"></td>' + '<td ><a href="' + google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '">' + google_ads[i].line1 + '<div style="text-decoration: none; ">' + google_ads[i].line2 + ' ' + google_ads[i].line3 + '</div></a>' + '<font color="gray"><a href="'+ google_ads[i].url + '" title="' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '" style="text-decoration:none; color:gray;">' + google_ads[i].visible_url + '</a></font>' + '</td></tr></table></div>' } d = document.getElementById('sky1'); d.innerHTML = s; if(s.length > 0) { document.getElementById('sky').style.display = 'block'; } } /* <body face="Arial"><br><table cellpadding=0><tr><td>  </td><td><table ><tr><td> </td><td colspan=2> <a href=" ### GOOGLE ADS[i] URL ### "> ### GOOGLE ADS[i] VISIBLE URL ### </a></td></tr> <tr><td valign=top><img style="margin-top:4px;" src=/images/a.gif></td><td></td><td> ### LINE 2 ###   ### LINE 3 ###</td></tr> <tr><td></td><td colspan=2><font color=gray> ### link ### </font>  (sponsored link)</td></tr> </table></td></tr></table> */ /* // For an image ad, display the image; there will be only one . if (google_ads[0].type == 'image') { s += '<tr><td align="center">' + '<a href="' + google_ads[0].url + '"style="text-decoration: none">' + '<img src="' + google_ads[0].image_url + '" height="' + google_ads[0].height + '" width="' + google_ads[0].width + '" border="0"></a></td></tr>'; } // Finish up anything that needs finishing up s += '</table>'; */ // document.write(s); return; } --> </script> <script language="JavaScript"> <!-- // This script sets the attributes for requesting ads. google_ad_client = "pub-9457578638026753"; google_max_num_ads = 6; google_feedback = "on"; google_ad_output = "js"; google_ad_channel = "844964098"; google_kw_type = "broad"; google_kw = "Standard Cantonese"; google_ad_type = "text_image"; google_image_size = "728x90"; google_encoding = "latin1"; --> </script> <script language="JavaScript" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js"> </script> <br> <p style="margin-left:30px;font-size:13px;"><b>Try your search on: <a href="http://www.qwika.com/find/Standard Cantonese">Qwika</a> (all wikis)</b></p> <form action=http://www.factbites.com/search.php><table width="100%" cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 border=0><tr><td background="/images/f1.gif"><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 border=0 background="/images/b.gif"><tr><td><img src="/images/f2.gif" width=38 height=37 alt=" "/></td><td><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 border=0><tr><td><a href="/"><img src="/images/f3.gif" width=95 height=37 alt="Factbites" border=0 /></a><img src="/images/b.gif" width=15 height=1 alt=" "/></td><td valign=bottom><input type=text size=30 name=kp><img src="/images/b.gif" width=2 height=1 alt=" " /><input type=submit value="  Find »  " class=b2></td></tr></table></td></tr><tr><td> </td><td><span class=f> <a href="http://www.factbites.com/about_us.php">About us</a>   |   <a href="http://www.factbites.com/why_use_us.php">Why use us?</a>   |   <a href="http://www.factbites.com/reviews.php">Reviews</a>   |   <a href="http://www.factbites.com/press.php">Press</a>   |   <a href="http://www.factbites.com/contact_us.php">Contact us</a>   <br />Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with <a href=http://www.factbites.com/terms_and_conditions.php>terms</a>.</span></td></tr></table><img src="/images/b.gif" width=450 height=1 alt=" " /></td></tr></table></form> </body></html>