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Topic: Stanford prison experiment


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In the News (Tue 21 Nov 17)

  
  The Stanford Prison Experiment: Still powerful after all these years (1/97)
She had walked into the experiment late and therefore was more likely to be startled than those who had been planning it for months and observing it for five days, she said.
Later, when she looked at the monitor of the prison yard again, she asked someone to point out John Wayne and was shocked to discover it was the young man she had talked with earlier.
In Zimbardo's view, prisons are "failed social-political experiments" that continue to bring out the worst in relations between people "because the public is indifferent to what takes place in secret there, and politicians use them, fill them up as much as they can, to demonstrate only that they are tough on crime.
www.stanford.edu /dept/news/pr/97/970108prisonexp.html   (2586 words)

  
  Virtual Magic: Stanford Prison Experiment   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Stanford prison experiment was a landmark psychological study of the human response to captivity, in particular, to the real world circumstances of prison life, and the effects of imposed social roles on behavior.
Prisoners were to wear only intentionally ill-fitting muslin smocks (without underwear) and rubber thong sandals, which Zimbardo said would force them to adopt "unfamiliar body postures" and discomfort in the interest of their disorientation.
Zimbardo decided to terminate the experiment early when Christina Maslach, a graduate student previously unfamiliar with the experiment, objected to the appalling conditions of the "prison" after she was brought in to conduct interviews.
virtualmagic.blogspot.com /2006/09/stanford-prison-experiment.html   (2135 words)

  
 The Stanford Prison Experiment
Prisoners were often not allowed to use the toilet and forced to urinate or defecate in a bucket in their cell, but not allowed to empty the buckets.
The prison setting is so powerful that it took on a life of its own and had changed the lives of every one in it.
The Stanford psychologists' primary reason for conducting the experiment was to focus on the power of roles, rules, symbols, group identity and situational validation of behavior that generally would repulse ordinary individuals.
www.francesfarmersrevenge.com /stuff/archive/oldnews5/stanford.htm   (797 words)

  
 Prison experiment connected to torture in Iraq - The Stanford Daily Online   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Prison guards were given no formal training about their role, free to set their own limits about how to keep the prisoners in control and command respect.
Prisoners were forced to forfeit their clothing, many had to clean the bathroom toilets with their bare hands; bags were placed over their faces during trips to the bathroom; and prisoners had to use pails as toilets during some days.
The difference between the experiment and the Iraqi prisoners is that in the experiment, the guards and prisoners were chosen randomly.
daily.stanford.edu /article/2004/5/21/prisonExperimentConnectedToTortureInIraq   (810 words)

  
 Stanford Prison Experiment movie,trailer,review,pics,pictures,poster,news,DVD at The Z Review
the Stanford Prison experiments held in 1972 where 12 students roleplayed as prisoners and guards with shocking results.
bout the study on the psychology of prison life where a group of undergrads assumed the roles of prisoners and guards.
Tim Talbott is currently writing the script about the study on the psychology of prison life where a group of undergrads assumed the roles of prisoners and guards.
www.thezreview.co.uk /comingsoon/s/stanfordprisonexperiment.htm   (381 words)

  
 Phil Zimbardo
PRISONS: My most notable study was the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment, which was a classic demonstration of the power of social situations to distort personal identities and long cherished values and morality as students internalized situated identities in their roles as prisoners and guards.
The details of that research are presented in the Stanford Prison Experiment web site at www.prisonexp.org, which now explores links to the abuses at Abu Ghraib Prison.
Our prize-winning DVD of the experiment, "Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment," is widely used in classrooms, civic groups and to train new guards at that infamous prison.
zimbardo.socialpsychology.org   (1182 words)

  
 Zimbardo prison experiment: 8/01
Strip searched, sprayed for lice and locked up with chains around their ankles, the "prisoners" were part of an experiment to test people's reactions to power dynamics in social situations.
They were soon humiliating the "prisoners" in an effort to break their will.
They are as bad for the guards as they are for the prisoners," he said, pointing to results of his experiment showing that both guards' and prisoners' personalities were warped by their given roles.
news-service.stanford.edu /news/august22/prison2-822.html   (1119 words)

  
 Pure Pedantry : Stanford Prison experiment posted on YouTube
She graduated from Stanford University with a BA in Economics, where -- when not drawing intersecting lines and cackling gleefully at her little equilibria -- she spent many an afternoon keeping orthopedists in summer homes by hurling herself across the rugby pitch.
Here's a cursory summary of the Stanford Prison Experiment: The basement of the Stanford psychology department was converted into a makeshift prison environment--old offices became cells, a closet became a room for solitary confinement and a room at the end of the corridor (or yard) became the guards' room.
Philip G. Zimbardo, who led the Stanford prison study in which two dozen college students were randomly selected to play the roles of prisoners or guards in a simulated jail, believes that his experiment has striking similarities to the Abu Gharib prison situation.
scienceblogs.com /purepedantry/2007/01/stanford_prison_experiment_pos.php   (1319 words)

  
 Stanford2_3
While experiments involving crime, prison and the law may seem more suited to the fields of Criminal Justice, Law and Psychology, the study is also useful to those interested in conflict management in higher education.
Prisoners experienced degradation, punishment, despair, oppression and depression as they started to actually believe they were prisoners.
The Stanford Prison Experiment, which was supposed to last for two weeks, ended after six days when researchers realized that guards were becoming abusive and prisoners were forgetting that they were not real prisoners.
www.campus-adr.org /CMHER/ReportResources/Edition2_3/Stanford2_3.html   (600 words)

  
 Demonstrating the Power of Social Situations via a Simulated Prison Experiment
The Stanford Prison Experiment extended that analysis to demonstrate the surprisingly profound impact of institutional forces on the behavior of normal, healthy participants.
Its chair, Senator Birch Bayh, prepared a new law for federal prisons requiring juveniles in pre-trial detention to be housed separately from adult inmates (to prevent their being abused), based on the abuse reported in the Stanford Prison Experiment of its juveniles in the pre-trial detention facility of the Stanford jail.
The situational analysis of the Stanford Prison Experiment redirects the search for blame from an exclusive focus on the character of an alleged "few bad apples" to systemic abuses that were inherent in the "bad barrel" of that corrupting prison environment.
www.psychologymatters.org /spe.html   (1081 words)

  
 yokim.net » Reaction Paper: Stanford Prison Experiment
The experiment agreement was rather vague on this respect and any kind of harassment or retention (such as when the whole prison was moved elsewhere to keep the system from parents) could be either interpreted as belonging or not belonging within the limits of the contract.
It should be remembered that when 8612 requested to be let out of the prison, he was talked by the “prison head” and the “superintendent” both of whom discouraged 8612 in such a derogatory way that 8612 ended up believing that his situation was a real imprisonment.
On the other hand, it could be argued that the prisons are still doing what they are supposed to do, just that now they’re revealing the underlying criminal impulses of individuals that could materialize at any moment, and argue that the students happened to have such criminalistic instincts.
yokim.net /text/549   (749 words)

  
 The Stanford Prison Experiment | Progressive U
On day two of the experiment, the prisoners staged a protest in which they "removed their stocking caps ripped off their numbers, and barricaded themselves inside the cells by putting their beds against the doors" (Zimbardo, 2006).
These psychological tactics included, over the remainder of the experiment, playing the prisoners against one another by giving some better foods or better treatment, making prisoners taunt one another, forcing prisoners to clean toilets with their bare hands, refusing to empty the bathroom buckets, extended the counts for hours at a time, etc (Zimbardo, 2006).
Day six saw the end of the experiment when researchers learned that the guards "were escalating their abuse of the prisoners" and an interviewer questioned the morality of the study (Zimbardo, 2006).
www.progressiveu.org /215524-the-stanford-prison-experiment   (1938 words)

  
 Ming the Mechanic: Stanford Prison Experiment
The Stanford Prison Experiment in 1971 is one of the more enlightening and frightening demonstrations of how easily humans accept a fake reality as real, and act accordingly.
The experience of those volunteer prisoners in 1971 is, unfortunately, also very comparable to the experience that millions of real prisoners go through.
Ironically, it was less than a month after the Stanford experiment, that the infamous riot broke out in Attica Prison in New York.
ming.tv /flemming2.php/__show_article/_a000010-000972.htm   (995 words)

  
 Prison Experiment shows we are a product of our environment
Prisoners were "arrested" at their homes, booked at an actual jail, and transported to the campus prison.
The experiences these men were subjected to were designed to intensify the effect of their assigned roles.
The prisoners were subjected to procedures designed to humiliate them and diminish their sense of individuality.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/psychology_everyday_life/50707   (646 words)

  
 Why social science can't explain Abu Ghraib. - By William Saletan - Slate Magazine
The terrible things my guards [at Stanford] did to their prisoners were comparable to the horrors inflicted on the Iraqi detainees.
At Stanford, according to Zimbardo, "Most of the guards seemed to be distressed by the decision to stop the experiment.
Prisoners have been photographed wearing hoods; but according to guards, it was intelligence officers who initially brought "hooded" prisoners to them.
www.slate.com /id/2100419   (1316 words)

  
 Why social science can't explain Abu Ghraib. - By William Saletan - Slate Magazine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The terrible things my guards [at Stanford] did to their prisoners were comparable to the horrors inflicted on the Iraqi detainees.
At Stanford, according to Zimbardo, "Most of the guards seemed to be distressed by the decision to stop the experiment.
Prisoners have been photographed wearing hoods; but according to guards, it was intelligence officers who initially brought "hooded" prisoners to them.
slate.msn.com /id/2100419   (1318 words)

  
 The Stanford prison experiment (1971)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Stanford prison experiment was a landmark psychological study of the human response to captivity, in particular, to the real world circumstances of prison life.
It was a variation of the Milgram experiment, which was conducted in 1963 by Zimbardo's former high school friend, Stanley Milgram at Yale University.
Das Experiment ("The Experiment" in the US) is a 2001 German movie inspired by the events of the Stanford prison experiment in the United States.
www.jahsonic.com /Stanford.html   (310 words)

  
 The Seattle Times: Living: The sickening predictability of our capacity for evil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In 1971, a team of psychologists, headed by Stanford University Professor Philip Zimbardo (who has been besieged by media interview requests in recent days) set out to study how normal people would react to playing the roles of guards and prisoners (www.prisonexp.org).
Prisoners tolerated increasing abuse because they had begun to think of themselves as prisoners; the guards dished it out because they now believed that was the right thing to do to a bunch of worthless, sneaky prisoners.
Prisons can establish safeguards against abuse, encourage reporting of misbehavior and treat it seriously, foster the attitude that inmates are fellow human beings, make each individual responsible for his behavior.
seattletimes.nwsource.com /html/living/2001920703_jdl06.html   (952 words)

  
 Foreign Prisoners Support Service
The prisoners were then brought into our jail one at a time and greeted by the warden, who conveyed the seriousness of their offense and their new status as prisoners.
At 2:30 A.M. the prisoners were rudely awakened from sleep by blasting whistles for the first of many "counts." The counts served the purpose of familiarizing the prisoners with their numbers (counts took place several times each shift and often at night).
Prisoners in the Maximum Adjustment Center were released from their cells by Soledad brother George Jackson, who had smuggled a gun into the prison.
www.phaseloop.com /foreignprisoners/exp-stanford-prison.html   (7259 words)

  
 The Stanford Prison Experiment: A Simulation Study of the Psychology of Imprisonment
The Stanford Prison Experiment: A Simulation Study of the Psychology of Imprisonment
Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment, including parallels with the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib.
Our planned two-week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated.
www.prisonexp.org   (175 words)

  
 How to Change the World: April 2007
Zimbardo conducted the (in)famous Stanford Prison Experiment in the summer of 1971.
Within thirty-six hours the first prisoner had an emotional breakdown and had to be released, followed in kind by similar prisoner breakdowns on each of the next four days.
My sense of the sickening similarities between the mock prison of the SPE and that all too real prison dungeon in the middle of a controversial war was also highlighted in one of the investigations into the causes of this human tragedy.
blog.guykawasaki.com /2007/04   (7326 words)

  
 Stanford Prison Experiment
Video of a prison in stanford where abusive conditions by the guards cause the prisoners to feel a loss of identity.
Even the very obeying prisoners are treated harshly and the methods of humiliation and disciplining prisoners progressively get worse.
All of this happens in 6 days, in a recreated prison environment, with only mentally and physically healthy people who volunteer to do it.
www.jimmyr.com /blog/Stanford_Prison_Experiment_258_2006.php   (136 words)

  
 BBC News | TV AND RADIO | Shocking experiment recreated for TV
The Stanford project of 1971 saw a group of men volunteer for an unknown experiment which was to see them turned into either prisoners or prison guards.
But the experiment did not go to plan and Stanford Professor Philip Zimbardo, who was in charge of the project, called it off after evidence emerged that the guards were becoming violent towards the ever more submissive prisoners.
The conclusion that was borne out was that stripped of their individual identities the prisoners would become passive while the guards would exercise their power to the extreme.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/entertainment/tv_and_radio/1986889.stm   (867 words)

  
 Stanford Prison Experiment News
The Stanford prison experiment was a landmark psychological study of the human response to captivity, in particular, to the real world circumstances of prison life, and the effects of imposed social roles on...
The Stanford Prison Experiment + The Milgram Experiment = Abu Ghraib etc. The Stanford Prison Experiment : a landmark 1971 psychological study of the human response to captivity, in particular, to the real...
In 1963, the psychology department at Stanford University conducted an experiment to observe the behavior of individuals in a make-believe prison.
www.topix.net /who/stanford-prison-experiment   (542 words)

  
 Stanford Prison Experiment
The illusion of prison created in marriages or relationships where one individual or spouse becomes “guard” and the other becomes prisoner.
The illusion of prison created in neurosis when one aspect of the person becomes the prisoner who is told he/she is inadequate and hopeless, while another aspect (of our self) serves as a personal guard.
The silent prison of shyness, in which the shy person is simultaneously his or her own guard or prisoner.
www.apsu.edu /www/business/faculty/bakerrl/stanpris.html   (627 words)

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