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Topic: Stanislavski System


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  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Konstantin Stanislavski
Stanislavsky's Method, also known as the System of Physical Actions, is a systematic approach to training actors to work from the inside outward, and is heavily influenced by "Affective Memory".
Stanislavski proposed that actors study and experience subjective emotions and feelings and to manifest them to audiences by physical and vocals means, also known as Theatre language.
Stanislavski survived both the Russian Revolution of 1905 and the Russian Revolution of 1917.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Konstantin-Stanislavski   (2108 words)

  
 Stanislavski System - Definition, explanation
The Stanislavski System is an approach to acting developed by Konstantin Stanislavski, a Russian actor, director, and theatre administrator.
The System is the result of Stanislavski's many years of efforts to determine how a human being can control, in performance, the most intangible and uncontrollable aspects of human behavior: things such as emotions, and artistic inspiration.
While Stanislavski was not the first to codify some system of acting (see for instance, any number of Victorian gesture-books for actors) it was for all intents and purposes the first to take questions and problems of psychological significance head on.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/s/st/stanislavski_system.php   (1667 words)

  
 American Masters . Constantin Stanislavsky | PBS
The Stanislavsky System, or "the method," as it has become known, held that an actor’s main responsibility was to be believed (rather than recognized or understood).
Stanislavsky believed that an actor needed to take his or her own personality onto the stage when they began to play a character.
Later Stanislavsky concerned himself with the creation of physical entries into these emotional states, believing that the repetition of certain acts and exercises could bridge the gap between life on and off the stage.
www.pbs.org /wnet/americanmasters/database/stanislavsky_c.html   (411 words)

  
 Stanislavski
His process of character development, the "Stanislavski Method", was the catalyst for method acting- arguably the most influential acting system on the modern stage and screen.
Stanislavsky was born Konstantin Sergeyevich Alexeyev in Moscow on January 5, 1863, amidst the transition from the feudal serfdom of Czarist Russia under the rule of Peter the Great, to the free enterprise of the Industrial Revolution.
Using this system, Stanislavski succeeded like no producer or director before him in translating the works of such renowned playwrights as Chekov and Gorki, whose writings were aptly suited to his method.
www.kryingsky.com /Stan/Biography/bot.html   (1078 words)

  
 PlanetPapers - Theatrical Practitioners: Konstantin Stanislavski System
Therefore Stanislavski protested against “mechanical” acting, exploitation of art, bathos, the art of representation, “theatricality” and the “star” system, and aimed to create a real, artistic, scenic truth by examining the psychological aspects of life by manipulating the subconscious via conscious physical action.
Stanislavski said that “Imagination creates things that can be or can happen.” An actor must develop her imagination and learn to think on any theme; this will help the actor to adapt easily to any role.
Stanislavski said that a play should be broken down into chunks, or units, by the actor or director in order to make the text more manageable.
www.planetpapers.com /Assets/3537.php   (1738 words)

  
  BBC - h2g2 - Konstantin Stanislavski and Method Acting
Stanislavski's chief worries early on as a director lay with the punctuality of the actors and their backstage drunkenness.
Stanislavski did not require actors to be the part, as is a popular misconception, but he did demand that they lived the part with the magic if.
Stanislavski demanded his actors to undergo a visual journey of motivation, including: who you are, where you came from, why, what you want, where you are going and what you will do when you get there.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/A5133151   (1889 words)

  
 Stanislavski System - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Stanislavski System is an approach to acting developed by Konstantin Stanislavski, a Russian actor, director, and theatre administrator.
The System is the result of Stanislavski's many years of efforts to determine how a human being can control, in performance, the most intangible and uncontrollable aspects of human behavior: things such as emotions, and artistic inspiration.
While Stanislavski was not the first to codify some system of acting (see for instance, any number of Victorian gesture-books for actors) it was for all intents and purposes the first to take questions and problems of psychological significance head on.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Stanislavski_System   (1656 words)

  
 Konstantin Stanislavski - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
It was at MAT that Stanislavski- based on the realist tradition of Aleksandr Pushkin- began developing his famous "System" (often called the "Method", though this is an inaccuracy; method acting was developed from it).
Stanislavski's System is a complex method for producing realistic characters; most of today's actors, on stage, television, and film, owe much to it.
Stanislavski also had an impact on modern opera and boosted the works of writers such as Maxim Gorki and Anton Chekhov.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Konstantin_Stanislavski   (416 words)

  
 The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Stanislavski System is an approach to acting developed by Konstantin Stanislavski, a Russian actor, director, and theatre administrator at the Moscow Art Theatre (founded 1897).
The System is the result of Stanislavski's many years of efforts to determine how a human being can control in performance the most intangible and uncontrollable aspects of human behavior: such as emotions, and artistic inspiration.
The System arose as a result of the questions a young Stanislavski had in regards to great actors he admired; such as the tragedians Maria Yermolova and Tommaso Salvini.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Stanislavski_System   (1754 words)

  
 Stanislavski - Dulwich College Drama
Stanislavski asked his actors to imagine what would happen if the rehearsal that he was running ran on too late, how the families would be affected, how the actors would get home etc. This imagining created a real response in the actors.
Stanislavski believed that it was an actor's duty to stimulate his or her experience 'emotion memory' by making a conscious effort to broaden his or her range of experience: to create, as it were, a reservoir from which to draw and on which to build.
Stanislavski asserted that it was possible for a character's inner tempo to be at odds with his/her outer tempo rhythm and that an actor should experiment with ways of portraying this on stage.
host.uniroma3.it /docenti/boylan/COURSES/gen/stanisl1.htm   (6261 words)

  
 Konstantin Stanislavski
He had an early interest in acting and took the stage-name Stanislavski to preserve the reputation of his family.
He laid the foundations of modern opera and boosted the works of writers such as Maxim Gorki and Anton Chekhov, whose works could be well used by his methodology.
In 1918 Stanislavski established the First Studio as a school for young actors and wrote several works: those available in English include the biography My Life in Art, An Actor Prepares, Building a Character, and Creating a Role.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/k/ko/konstantin_stanislavski.html   (257 words)

  
 dreamdust   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Neither Stanislavski nor Brecht wished to educate actors or audiences with the existing practices and so developed their own systems to challenge what was before them.
The exercises that Stanislavski introduced were designed to enable the actors to live the life of their character even when they were off stage.
Stanislavski challenged the melodrama and lack of respect for the theatre by developing a system that involved detailed research and commitment.
www.dreamdust.co.uk /work/compare.html   (1609 words)

  
 THE SYSTEM
Stanislavski was also concerned with action, both outward and physical, and when a character has a concentrated stillness on the stage, (‘inner intensity’).
Stanislavski points out: “If you speak any lines, or do anything, mechanically, without fully realising who you are, where you came from, why, what you want, where you are going, and what you will do when you get there, you will be acting without your imagination”.
The whole System was designed to allow characters to become more in depth than they normally would at that time of Stanislavski and he spent many years trying to studying and experimenting with his System.
www.beyondthedoor.co.uk /system.htm   (2377 words)

  
 Essay: Out line your present understanding of Stanislavski's system
Konstantin Sergeivich Stanislavski was born in 1863 and dies in 1938.
Stanislavski believed that theatre was about working together, he recognized the need to improve the theatre practice of his time and saw actors needed methods to help them act well and consistently.
The areas Stanislavski believed were important to concentrate on included imagination, observation, creativity, physical and vocal skills and intellectual analysis.
www.coursework.info /A2_and_A-Level/Drama/Out_line_your_present_understanding_of_Stanislavskis_system_L120948.html   (229 words)

  
 DramaWorks > Publications > Stanislavski
Stanislavski is rightly called the 'father of modern theatre', his System of acting became the backbone of twentieth century theatre craft.
Rather it covers the salient points Stanislavski made in his many books and studio experiments, to order them into a logical form so that they can be easily followed and understood by students and to translate them into purely practical terms so that each theory can be tested through practice.
Basically the whole System is the set of aids by which the actor is helped to believe he is the role he is creating.
www.dramaworks.co.uk /stanislavski.html   (1772 words)

  
 Method - Search Results - MSN Encarta
- acting technique: a theory and system of acting that involves the actor identifying strongly with the internal motivation of the character being portrayed.
Stanislavski Method, system of acting developed by the celebrated Russian actor and director Konstantin Stanislavski, intended to produce dramatic...
Suzuki Method, system of music education developed in the 20th century and aimed at very young children.
uk.encarta.msn.com /Method.html   (170 words)

  
 [No title]
When Stanislavski started in the Theatre standards were haphazard and actors would inhabit the stage as they sought fit and deliver the lines of the text downstage centre and out front.
Stanislavski suggests that the actor selects the “most absorbing memories” of feelings and sensations, and weaves the life of the character from them.
Stanislavski believed that the art of theatre demands “constant renewal, constant, persistent work… it is alive, and like everything living, it must have uninterrupted development and movement.
www.colchsfc.ac.uk /media/thestuds/stanrev.doc   (1573 words)

  
 Stanislavsky Method Acting :: the Method :: Stanislavski System :: Acting Technique :: Sydney Australia
Stanislavsky discovered that acting could be learnt and created a system, which enabled a person to train as an actor step by step.
Stanislavsky System is a great contribution, a luminous legacy to the art of theatre.
Stanislavsky proves that an actor with great talent and subtle means and nuances needs more technique than others, and thus emphasizes his rejection of the widespread layman's opinion that a gifted actor does not need any technique at all.
www.geocities.com /eco_gr00v3r/method.html   (401 words)

  
 Stanislavski
Stanislavski investigated and charted the acting process that good actors used intuitively.
According to Stanislavski, an important aspect of building a character pertains to the subtext.
For Stanislavski, the subtext is the inward “life of a human spirit.
www.angelfire.com /ny2/bwu/Stanislavski.html   (1227 words)

  
 Free Essay Stanislavski’s Life and Impact on Theater
Stanislavski coined phrases such as "stage direction", laid the foundations of modern opera and gave instant renown to the works of such talented writers and playwrights as Anton Chekhov.
Using this system, Stanislavski succeeded like no producer or director before him in translating the works of such renowned playwrights as Chekov, whose writings were aptly suited to his method.
Stanislavski was not a political creature and under the Soviet regime he continued with his work, although he acknowledged to Nemirovich (in 1922) that audiences could no longer relate to Chekhov's plays because of the recent events that they had lived through.
www.echeat.com /essay.php?t=30268   (1415 words)

  
 Stanislavski System . Russia . Elia Kazan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The System is, through a sort of shorthand, often confused with the Method because of its close ties to New York, and again because of figures like Adler, who visited Stanislavski himself.
The System is the result of Stanislavski s many years of efforts to determine how a human being can control, in performance, the most intangible and uncontrollable aspects of human behavior: things such as emotions, and artistic inspiration.
The System arose as a result of the questions a young Stanislavski had regarding great actors whom he admired in his youth actors like the tragedian Tommasso Salvini and how these actors seemed to operate on different rules than everyone else, and yet like everyone else, they were susceptible on some
www.uk.fraquisanto.net /Stanislavski_System   (758 words)

  
 A Level Drama Theorists
Although Stanislavski died in 1938, his theories of "method acting" which are explained in his three books "An Actor Prepares", "Building a Character" and "Creating a Role", are still one of the greatest influences in the world of performance today.
Therefore, to follow the teachings of Stanislavski it is necessary for the actor to totally immerse himself, body, soul and mind, in the part that he is playing.
Stanislavski was aware that many performers tend to "stop acting," or lose their concentration, when they are not the main characters in a scene or when someone else is talking.
mkdrama.freeservers.com /custom3.html   (5041 words)

  
 Method Acting/Stanislavski
The Stanislavski System, or "the method," as it has become known, held that an actor’s main responsibility was to be believed (rather than recognized or understood).
To reach this "believable truth", Stanislavski first employed methods such as "emotional memory." To prepare for a role that involves fear, the actor must remember something frightening, and attempt to act the part in the emotional space of that fear they once felt.
Stanislavski believed that an actor needed to take his or her own personality onto the stage when they began to play a character.
www.pelicanplayers.com /methodacting.htm   (472 words)

  
 Stanislavski System | theatre australia
Stanislavski system,which until now i hadn't heard of (i have been acting for 5 years).
" Stanislavski's System focused on the development of realistic characters and stage worlds" (quote from wikipedia).The methods mentioned are correct, except that I wrote effective not affective...
Yes it was meant to be brief and basic, not a university level explanation.
www.theatre.asn.au /tech_talk/stanislavski_system   (795 words)

  
 Northern Illinois University   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Through this course of study I will be able to evaluate both the Miesner and Stanislavski methods of training to better understand their strengths and weaknesses and their future viability, while advancing and refining my own skills as an actor, teacher, coach and director.
As an actor, the Stanislavski Method has left a rather majestic and often perplexing mark on the last century.
The development and changes that the Stanislavski system have undergone in the last hundred years or so are of great importance in understanding how it will become integrated into the theatre of this century.
www.niu.edu /usoar/proposals/stanislavsky.shtml   (1551 words)

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