Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Statute mile


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 28 Nov 14)

  
 Mile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Mile is the name of several units of length; today, one mile is mainly equal to about 1609 metres on land and 1852 metres at sea and in the air, but see below for the details.
The name statute mile goes back to Queen Elizabeth I of England who redefined the mile from 5000 feet to 5280 feet by statute in 1593.
When the international mile was agreed upon in 1959, the survey mile was retained for measurements derived from US geodetic surveys.
usapedia.com /m/mile.html   (462 words)

  
 Converting from nautical miles to statute miles
A statute mile is 5,280 feet in length.
To convert from statute to nautical miles a factor of 1.15 is generally used, even though it is not precise.
Statute miles are used for inland areas such as the Intracoastal Waterway and the Great Lakes.
www.boatsafe.com /nauticalknowhow/miles.htm   (330 words)

  
 Mile -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The U.S. survey mile is precisely equal to 5280 U.S. survey feet or 6336/3937 (A metric unit of length equal to 1000 meters (or 0.621371 miles)) kilometers or, approximately 1609.347 meters.
The name statute mile goes back to Queen (Click link for more info and facts about Elizabeth I of England) Elizabeth I of England who redefined the mile from 5000 feet to 8 (A unit of length equal to 220 yards) furlongs (5280 feet) by statute in 1593.
In Norway and Sweden, a mile in daily speech refers to a traditional unit that is still very commonly used, but now defined as 10 kilometers, see (A unit of length equal to one thousandth of an inch; used to specify thickness (e.g., of sheets or wire)) mil.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/m/mi/mile.htm   (746 words)

  
 statute - definition by dict.die.net
Statute cap, a kind of woolen cap; -- so called because enjoined to be worn by a statute, dated in 1571, in behalf of the trade of cappers.
Statute of limitations (Law), a statute assigned a certain time, after which rights can not be enforced by action.
Statute staple, a bond of record acknowledged before the mayor of the staple, by virtue of which the creditor may, on nonpayment, forthwith have execution against the body, lands, and goods of the debtor, as in the statute merchant.
dict.die.net /statute   (642 words)

  
 fishSA.com - Statute Miles vs Nautical Miles [Boating - Nautical File]
The nautical mile is frequently confused with the geographical mile, which is equal to 1 min of arc on the Earth's equator (6087.15 ft.).
Statute mile: A unit of distance equal to 1.609 km (0.869 nmi, 5280 ft.).
From all this, we can state that a knot is a unit of speed one nautical mile per hour, which is approximately 1.15 land or statute miles per hour.
www.fishsa.com /boatngsn.php   (169 words)

  
 Statute Mile Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length.
Today, one mile (often called "statute mile") is equal to about 1609 m on land and one nautical mile to exactly 1852 m at sea and in the air.
The international mile is equivalent to 8 furlongs, or 80 chains, or 5280 international feet.
popularityguide.com /encyclopedia/Statute_mile   (431 words)

  
 Navigation Tutorial Page 5   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A statute mile is the common "mile" with a length of 5,280 feet.
Therefore a statute mile is not as long as a nautical mile.
Making the conversion from nautical miles to statute miles would be done as 120 nautical miles x 1.15 statute miles = 138 statute miles.
quest.arc.nasa.gov /aero/virtual/demo/navigation/tutorial/tutorial5.html   (835 words)

  
 Latitude-Longitude Conversion to Feet
A minute of latitude is equal to one nautical mile, or 6076 feet; thus, a second of latitude (6076 divided by 60) is 101 feet, 3 inches.
Conceptually and practically, latitude is the same no matter where you go on earth; however, in reality it varies from 69.41 statute miles per minute at the poles to 68.70 statute miles per minute at the equator due to the earth bulging slightly from its rotational spin.
Finally, 60 degrees North (southern border of the Northwest Territories), a degree of longitude is 34.67 statute miles, 3051 feet (930 meters) per minute, 50.85 feet (15.5 meters) per second.
www.hypernews.org /HyperNews/get/trails/SAR/291/1.html?nogifs   (323 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
1 nautical mile is equivalent to 1.150782 statute miles.
In 1593 it was redefined as 5280 feet by statute of Queen Elizabeth of England.
One nautical mile is the angular distance of 1 minute of arc on the Earth's surface as messured against a circle whose plane intersects the centre of the planet.
www.orbitersim.com /v2/read.asp?id=18366   (747 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Statute mile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The U.S. survey mile is precisely equal to 6336/3937 kilometres or 5280 U.S. survey feet, approximately 1609.347 metres.
In Norway and Sweden, a mile in daily speech refers to a traditional unit that is still very commonly used, but now defined as 10 kilometres, see mil.
In Ireland the Irish mile of 2240 yards (about 2048.3 m) was used legally until 1826, and by some reports survives still on road signage in parts of the country.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Statute-mile   (605 words)

  
 Units: M
In Austria this came to 7586 meters (4.714 miles); in northern Germany it was 4.6805 miles or 7532.5 meters.
The metric mile is equal to 1500 meters or 1.5 kilometers (approximately 0.932 057 statute mile or 4921.26 feet).
In 1592, Parliament settled the question in England by defining the statute mile to be 8 furlongs, 80 chains, 320 rods, 1760 yards or 5280 feet.
www.unc.edu /~rowlett/units/dictM.html   (11669 words)

  
 Aerospaceweb.org | Ask Us - Knots and the Nautical Mile
A Roman mile is therefore the equivalent of 4,850 feet, 1,615 yards, or 1,479 meters in modern dimensions.
When the definition of the nautical mile was specified by international agreement, its value was based on this idealized Earth so that it is the average of one minute of arc in both the equatorial and polar planes.
Since the nautical mile and the knot are some of the fundamental cornerstones of navigation at sea, it is natural that they transferred to aviation as well.
www.aerospaceweb.org /question/history/q0139.shtml   (1239 words)

  
 mile - definition by dict.die.net
Mill the tenth of a cent, Million.] A certain measure of distance, being equivalent in England and the United States to 320 poles or rods, or 5,280 feet.
Geographical, or Nautical mile, one sixtieth of a degree of a great circle of the earth, or 6080.27 feet.
Statute mile, a mile conforming to statute, that is, in England and the United States, a mile of 5,280 feet, as distinguished from any other mile.
dict.die.net /mile   (175 words)

  
 Nautical Tables   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The first set are conversion tables from nautical miles to statute ones and statute to nautical.
A nautical mile is equal to 6080 feet, whereas a statute mile is 5280 feet.
The distance to the horizon is given in both nautical (NM) and statute miles (SM).
mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk /CKS/ntables.htm   (217 words)

  
 Measured Mile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A nautical mile is 6080 feet in length, as opposed to the land based statute mile which is 5280 feet in length.
The statute mile is an arbitrary measure of distance and has been legally fixed at 5280 feet.
The nautical mile is defined as “ the arc of the earth's circumference subtended by an angle of one minute at the centre of curvature”.
www.polperro.org /measuredmile.html   (448 words)

  
 Math Forum - Ask Dr. Math
The word comes from the Latin word for 1000, mille, because originally a mile was the distance a Roman legion could march in 1000 paces (or 2000 steps, a pace being the distance between successive falls of the same foot).
In medieval Britain, several mile units were used, including a mile of 5000 feet (1524 meters), the modern mile defined as 8 furlongs (1609 meters), and a longer mile similar to the French mille (1949 meters), plus the Scottish mile (1814 meters) and the Irish mile (2048 meters).
In 1592 the British Parliament settled the question by defining the statute mile to be 8 furlongs, 80 chains, 320 rods, 1760 yards or 5280 feet.
mathforum.org /library/drmath/view/61126.html   (294 words)

  
 Mile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In navigation, the geographical mile was commonly used, defined as 1 minute of arc along the Earth's equator, approximately equal to 1855 meters.
The Ole Rømer mile was for a long time used as a sea mile in Scandinavia, but was in the middle of the 20th century replaced by the international nautical mile (which corresponds to 1 minute of arc).
In Ireland the Irish mile of 2240 yards (about 2048.3 meters) was used legally until 1826, and by some reports survived until the conversion to the meter as the unit measurement for distance, in early January 2005.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/M/Mile.htm   (693 words)

  
 mile
Often referred to as the statute mile, from its having been established by a statute of Elizabeth I (“An Acte againste newe Buyldinges,” 35 Elizabeth I. chapter 6, 1592/3) which forbade building within 3 miles of the gates of London, and included a definition of this mile.
The Saxons seem to have retained a 5,000-foot mile (their mil), but the Saxon foot was even shorter than the Roman one, closer to the size of a real foot.
This mile has been dubbed the old English mile, 14th – 17th century, although it is probably no older than the statute mile.
www.sizes.com /units/mile.htm   (491 words)

  
 All Records Afloat Beaten by the Arrow [1902]
Her best record heretofore was 1:37.5 for a statute mile of 5,280 feet, or at the rate of 36 statute miles an hour, with one boiler.
Those on the Nushka, although a mile and a half away, saw in a few seconds that she had "picked up a bone" and would enter the nautical mile at top speed.
The tremor at utmost speed yesterday was increased slightly, and the gliding qualities of the yacht were so perfect that an officer standing on the deck while she was speeding, said that the sensation was as if the craft was going to slip away from under him.
www.lesliefield.com /other_history/all_records_afloat_beaten_by_the.htm   (1487 words)

  
 All about Nautical Charts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A chart shows the nature and form of the coast, the depths of the water and general character and configuration of the sea bottom, locations of dangers to navigation, the rise and fall of the tides, locations of man-made aids to navigation, and the characteristics of the Earth's magnetism.
The United States claims 12 nautical miles for its territorial sea and 200 nautical miles fisheries jurisdiction and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) for the exploration and management of both living and nonliving marine resources.
Although new technologies can help recreational boaters navigate safely by providing electronic charts and GPS positioning information in a simple and inexpensive manner, it is the obligation of a boater who is navigating to do so by all means available, which means checking that electronic fix the old fashion way, using a nautical chart.
great-circle.com /navigation/charts.htm   (1123 words)

  
 General Tables of Units of Measurement   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The term "statute mile" originated with Queen Elizabeth I who changed the definition of the mile from the Roman mile of 5000 feet to the statute mile of 5280 feet.
The international mile and the U.S. statute mile differ by about 3 millimeters although both are defined as being equal to 5280 feet.
The international mile is based on the international foot (0.3048 meter) whereas the U.S. statute mile is based on the survey foot (1200/3937 meter).
ts.nist.gov /ts/htdocs/230/235/appxc/appxc.htm   (1366 words)

  
 Math Forum - Ask Dr. Math   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Date: 12/11/96 at 01:04:19 From: Doctor Rob Subject: Re: Statute Miles and Nautical Miles A mile was originally 1000 ("mille" in Latin) paces of a Roman soldier.
It is called a nautical mile because sailors have been using it for many, many years.
They probably use the phrase "statute miles" for space shuttle launches to make sure that everyone understands that these are not nautical miles, which is what the navy tends to use, but rather the more common kind that most people are familiar with from their cars' speedometers and odometers.
mathforum.org /dr.math/problems/simon5.11.96.html   (410 words)

  
 Re: How did statute miles come to be an absurd length of 5280 feet?
Later, under Queen Elizabeth I, the Statute of 1593 AD confirmed the use of a shorter foot that made the length of the furlong 660 feet, adding another 280 feet to the mile.
For this reason, the international definition of the nautical mile was changed to 1.852 km (1.1508 statute miles), not exactly a round number.
Rather than look to the nautical mile as a replacement for the statute mile, it makes more sense to discard both and use kilometers, especially since over 90% of the world population already use this system.
www.madsci.org /posts/archives/1997-12/875400266.Sh.r.html   (347 words)

  
 The Undersea Adventures of Capt'n Eli - Daily Comics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
1 Nautical Mile is equal to 1.151 Statute Miles.
("Statute mile" is what we know as miles and is a measurement of distance over land.
A league is distance of 3 nautical miles.
www.captneli.com /nautical.php   (195 words)

  
 CAL Maritime - Follow The Voyage 2004
The Nautical mile is equal to about 6076 feet, while the statute mile that we use on land is about 5280 feet.
The nautical mile is very useful at sea as it is derived from latitude.
That means that if we have 360 degrees of latitude to go around the world, that each degree is about 60 miles, (21600 divided by 360.) There are 60 minutes of latitude in one degree and thus, one minute of latitude equals one nautical mile.
www.csum.edu /archives/vctsgb04/cruise2004/05062004   (295 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.