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Topic: Structuralism


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Sociology before the Russian Revolution
The new current, Structuralism, continued the project of positivism to find an objective, rational and “scientific” methodology for analysing the data of perception, needing to account for the deep structural crises and transformative processes which were manifested in turn-of-the-century Europe, for which positivism was patently inadequate.
The other source of structural linguistics is N S Trubetzkoy, a Russian Nobleman who sought to unite transcendental philosophy and empiricist and rationalist science around a concept of a universal soul, with faith as a pre-condition of experience, not entirely dissimilar from Wundt’s psycho-physical parallelism.
Structural psychology begins from Wilhelm Wundt’s “experimental psychology”;: the mind was defined in terms of the simplest definable components and then to find the way in which these components fit together in complex forms using the tool of controlled introspection.
www.marxists.org /reference/subject/philosophy/help/structur.htm   (2753 words)

  
  Structuralism and Post-structuralism
It became a standard assumption in narratology that the structure of a story was homologous with the structure of a sentence; this assumption allowed the apparatus of sentence-linguistics to be applied to the development of a metalanguage for describing narrative structure...
Structuralism, then, would appear to be a refuge for all immanent criticism against the danger of fragmentation that threatens thematic analysis: the means of reconstituting the unit of a work, its principle of coherence...
The 'total structure' which it identified as the enemy was an historically particular one: the armed, repressive state of late monopoly capitalism, and the Stalinist politics which pretended to confront it but were deeply complicit with its rule.
www.arts.gla.ac.uk /SESLL/EngLit/ugrad/hons/theory/(Post)Structuralism.htm   (6831 words)

  
  Structuralism
Structuralism is a general approach in various academic disciplines that explores the inter-relationships between fundamental elements of some kind, upon which some higher mental, linguistic, social, cultural etc "structures" are built, through which then meaning is produced within a particular person, system, culture.
Structuralism appeared in academic psychology for the first time in the 19th century and then reappeared in the second half of the 20th century, when it grew to become one of the most popular approaches in the academic fields that are concerned with analyzing language, culture, and society.
In literary theory structuralism is an approach to analysing the narrative material by examining the underlying invariant structure.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/s/st/structuralism.html   (2020 words)

  
  Structuralism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Structuralism is an approach in academic disciplines that explores the relationships between fundamental elements of some kind, upon which some higher mental, linguistic, social, cultural etc. "structures" are built, through which then meaning is produced within a particular person, system, or culture.
Structuralism appeared in academic psychology for the first time in the 19th century and then reappeared in the second half of the 20th century, when it grew to become one of the most popular approaches in the academic fields that are concerned with analyzing language, culture, and society.
In literary theory structuralism is an approach to analyzing the narrative material by examining the underlying invariant structure.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Structuralism   (2241 words)

  
 Post-structuralism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The period was marked by political anxiety, as students and workers alike rebelled against the state in May 1968, nearly causing the downfall of the French government.
Structuralism proposed itself as a study of the underlying structures inherent in cultural products (such as texts) utilizing analytical concepts from linguistics, psychology, anthropology, and other fields.
The occasional designation of post-structuralism as a movement can be tied to the fact that mounting criticism of structuralism became evident at approximately the same time that structuralism became a topic of interest in universities in the United States.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Post-structuralism   (2005 words)

  
 Structuralism - Information from Reference.com
Structuralism as a term refers to various theories across the humanities, social sciences and economics many of which share the assumption that structural relationships between concepts vary between different cultures/languages and that these relationships can be usefully exposed and explored.
Structuralism appeared in academia for the first time in the 19th century and then reappeared in the second half of the 20th century, when it grew to become one of the most popular approaches in academic fields concerned with the analysis of language, culture, and society.
A structural paradigm is actually a class of linguistic units (lexemes, morphemes or even constructions) which are possible in a certain position in a given linguistic environment (like a given sentence), which is the syntagm.
www.reference.com /search?q=Structuralism   (3137 words)

  
 More on Structuralism
Structuralism is an approach that grew to become one of the most widely used methods of analyzing language, culture, philosophy of mathematics, and society in the second half of the 20th century.
Structuralism in mathematics is the study of what structures say a mathematical object is, and how the ontology of these structures should be understood.
Structuralism rejected existentialism's notion of radical human freedom and focused instead on the way that human behavior is determined by cultural, social, and psychological structures.
www.artilifes.com /structuralism.htm   (1737 words)

  
 Structuralism: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
Structuralism has been influential in literary criticism and history, as with the work of Roland Barthes and Michel Foucault.
In France after 1968 this search for the deep structure of the mind was criticized by such "poststructuralists"; as Jacques Derrida, who abandoned the goal of reconstructing reality scientifically in favor of "deconstructing"; the illusions of metaphysics (see semiotics).
Structuralism and Semiotics We live in a world of signs, and...critics turned to the methods of analysis loosely termed structuralism and semiotics.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/101272819   (1421 words)

  
 structuralism
Structuralism is the name that is given to a wide range of discourses that study underlying structures of signification.
The earliest scholars working in the idiom of structuralism proceeded from the premise that all kinds of cultural activity could be analysed objectively on the model of the empirical sciences.
Structuralism assumes that for every process (an utterance for instance) there is a system of underlying laws that govern it.
courses.nus.edu.sg /course/elljwp/structuralism.htm   (4771 words)

  
 Department of English Languages and Literature - Courses
Structuralism notes that much of our imaginative world is structured of, and structured by, binary oppositions (being/nothingness, hot/cold, culture/nature); these oppositions structure meaning, and one can describe fields of cultural thought, or topoi, by describing the binary sets which compose them.
Structuralism forms the basis for semiotics, the study of signs: a sign is a union of signifier and signified, and is anything that stands for anything else (or, as Umberto Eco put it, a sign is anything that can be used to lie).
Structuralism enables both the reading of texts and the reading of cultures: through semiotics, structuralism leads us to see everything as 'textual', that is, composed of signs, governed by conventions of meaning, ordered according to a pattern of relationships.
www.brocku.ca /english/courses/4F70/struct.html   (2742 words)

  
 Indistinct Union: Christianity, Integral Philosophy, and Politics: Follow up on Structuralism
A simple (though not simplistic) definition of structuralism is: structuralism=linguistic Kantianism.
Structuralism took the same basic move but started not with the human mental architecture but with language.
When those movements went too far, by referring all causality solely to such outside structures and how they had overtaken the inner agency of the ego, they proclaimed the "death of man" (end of humanism).
indistinctunion.blogspot.com /2006/08/follow-up-on-structuralism.html   (2105 words)

  
 Post Structuralism by Roger Jones
In the study of language, the structural linguistics of Ferdinand de Saussure (1857-1913) suggested that meaning was to be found within the structure of a whole language rather than in the analysis of individual words.
Psychoanalysts attempted to describe the structure of the psyche in terms of an unconscious.
Firstly, he did not think that there were definite underlying structures that could explain the human condition and secondly he thought that it was impossible to step outside of discourse and survey the situation objectively.
www.philosopher.org.uk /poststr.htm   (921 words)

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