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Topic: Stuttering


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In the News (Mon 22 Jul 19)

  
  Stuttering
Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the normal flow of speech is disrupted by frequent repetitions or prolongations of speech sounds, syllables or words or by an individual's inability to start a word.
Stuttering is different from two additional speech fluency disorders, cluttering, characterized by a rapid, irregular speech and spasmodic dysphonia, a voice disorder.
Stuttering is generally diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist, a professional who is specially trained to test and treat individuals with voice, speech and language disorders.
www.nidcd.nih.gov /health/voice/stutter.asp   (1311 words)

  
 - Have a problem stutter or stammer. The How to stop stuttering stammering centre can help
1% of the population suffers from the effects of a stammer or stutter.
She had tried many forms of stuttering therapy and was very sceptical before the course.
During the eighteen years that I had a stutter, I did not want to be mocked, I certainly did not want any form of sympathy, all I wanted was to be treated like the normal person I was.
www.stammering-stuttering.co.uk   (1076 words)

  
  Official Stuttering FAQ
Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases; and involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the stutterer is unable to produce sounds.
Stuttering appears to reduce stress temporarily, but then cause stress, creating a cyclical pattern in which the stutterer stutters on the first syllable of the first word, then says the rest of the word and several more words fluently, then stutters again, then says a few more words fluently, and so on.
Stutterers are usually trained to breathe with their diaphragms, gently increase vocal fold tension at the beginning of words (gentle onsets), slow their speaking rate by stretching vowels, and reduce articulatory pressure.
www.casafuturatech.com /Book/faq.html   (3450 words)

  
  Stuttering
Stuttering is a form of dysfluency - an interruption in the flow of speech.
However, if your child's stuttering is frequent, continues to get worse, and is accompanied by body or facial movements, it's a good idea for a speech-language therapist to evaluate your child before he or she is 3 years old.
If your school-age child continues to stutter, he or she is likely aware of the problem and may be embarrassed by it.
www.kidshealth.org /parent/emotions/behavior/stutter.html   (788 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the normal flow of speech is disrupted by frequent repetitions or prolongations of speech sounds, syllables or words or by an individual's inability to start a word.
Stuttering is generally diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist, a professional who is specially trained to test and treat individuals with voice, speech and language disorders.
Stuttering characteristics are being examined to help identify groups of individuals who have similar types of stuttering and therefore may have a common cause.
www.healthieryou.com /stutter.html   (1262 words)

  
  Stuttering   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Stuttering may be defined as a nonstereotyped interruption in the normal rhythm of speech manifested by symptoms of involuntary (1) repetition of words, part-words, or sounds, (2) prolongation of sounds, and (3) blocking of words, all of which are usually accompanied by tense movements of the face, jaw, and occasionally an extremity.
There are activities of the stuttering child that are usually associated with the development of temporary fluency: singing, choral reading, repeated readings of the same passage, and, during speech, when the introduction of background noise interferes with the child's hearing his or her own voice.
Neurogenic acquired (organic) stuttering' is associated with degenerative brain disease, as a sequela to acute brain damage or meningitis, and is associated with metastatic brain tumor, severe mental retardation, and cerebral vascular infarction.
www.rogerknapp.com /medical/stutter.htm   (4511 words)

  
 Lifespan's A - Z Health Information Library - Stuttering   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Stuttering is a disorder that involves hesitation, repetition, or stumbling while speaking.
Stuttering tends to run in families, but it is unclear to what extent genetic factors are important.
Complications of stuttering may include social problems caused by the fear of ridicule, which may make a child avoid speaking entirely.
www.lifespan.org /adam/healthillustratedencyclopedia/1/001427.html   (441 words)

  
 Stuttering in Children - Keep Kids Healthy
The stuttering usually comes and goes and is most noticeable when your child is excited, stressed or overly tired, but the child usually doesn't notice or have any reaction to his behavior.
Stuttering is usually not a concern, as long as it doesn't persist for more than two to three months or at least gradually improve during that time period.
Stuttering Foundation of America: "the first nonprofit, charitable association in the world to concern itself with the prevention and improved treatment of stuttering, distributes over a million publications to the public and professionals each year.
www.keepkidshealthy.com /welcome/conditions/stuttering.html   (686 words)

  
 Stuttering - Better Health Channel.
Stuttering, or stammering, is a speech disorder characterised by interruptions to speech such as hesitating, repeating sounds and words, or prolonging sounds.
Stuttering can be mild, moderate or severe, and can even vary within the same individual from one day to the next, particularly with children.
The fact that stuttering tends to run in families indicates that genetics is involved somehow in the condition.
www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au /bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/(Pages)/Stuttering?OpenDocument   (919 words)

  
 The Children's Hospital at Westmead - Parents - Stuttering
Stuttering is a disorder that affects the fluency of speech.
Most children begin stuttering between the ages of 2 and 5 years, when speech and language is developing.
For example, a child who is already stuttering may stutter more when excited, tired, arguing, given limited time to speak, competing to be heard, or speaking to someone new.
www.chw.edu.au /parents/factsheets/stuttering.htm   (902 words)

  
 Stuttering: what can be done about it?
But for parents who remember stuttering themselves as children (and those for whom the problem persists) recognising that their own child is stuttering is something that they have probably anticipated having to deal with one day.
Pretending to ignore the stutter (supposedly, to make it go away) or pretending that stuttering is a normal phase in speech and language development is completely the wrong thing to do, and may leave the child confused and wondering why her struggle to speak fluently is an unmentionable subject.
Children who stutter are very likely to have inherited their "stuttering potential" or "stuttering predisposition" from their mother, father, grandmother or grandfather, with 50 to 75 per cent of people who stutter having at least one relative who also stutters.
members.tripod.com /caroline_bowen/stuttering.htm   (1178 words)

  
 Stuttering FAQ v.3.22
Stutterers are not more nervous, do not have worse self-esteem, and are not "schizo," as some movies have portrayed stutterers.
Stuttering appears to be caused by excessive amounts of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the left caudate nucleus.
Stuttering usually occurs on the initial sound or syllable of a word, in the first word of a sentence, on accented syllables, and on "content" words.
www.faqs.org /faqs/support/stuttering   (5039 words)

  
 Stuttering Information on Healthline
Individuals who stutter are often aware of their stuttering and feel a loss of control when they are disfluent.
Stuttering is a confusing and often misunderstood developmental speech and language disorder.
The disfluencies produced by people who stutter will often be similar to those in the speech of individuals who do not stutter; however, certain types of disfluent behavior are likely to appear only in the speech of people who stutter.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/stuttering-1   (799 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering, sometimes referred to as stammering or disfluent speech, is a speech disorder.
Neurogenic stuttering is also a common disorder that occurs from signal problems between the brain and nerves and muscles.
Psychogenic stuttering is believed to originate in the mind in the area of the brain that directs thought and reasoning.
www.nasal.net /otolaryngology/stutter.htm   (649 words)

  
 stutt, Stuttering Research From East Carolina - Stuttering Research, Therapy and Electronic Devices to Alleviate ...
Instead of being the core stuttering ‘problem’, syllabic repetitions may be a biological mechanism, or ‘solution’, to the central involuntary stuttering block.
Simply put, stuttering is an endogenous transitory state of ‘shadowed speech’, a choral speech derivative that allows for a neural release of the central block.
Stuttering can be effectively inhibited via exogenous sensory signals (e.g., speaking in unison or using altered auditory feedback) or by using endogenous motoric strategies (e.g., singing or therapeutically implementing long vowel prolongations to reduce speech rates).
www.ecu.edu /csd/Stutt.html   (1855 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering is often accompanied by tension and anxiety.
There is also evidence that stuttering is due to a disorder in the timing of movements of speech muscles, a defect in auditory feedback, and a lack of cerebral dominance for language functions.
People who stutter in general show a shift in brain activation from the left to the right side of the brain, suggesting that they process language differently.
www.hsdc.org /Parent/Speech/stutter.htm   (841 words)

  
 Employers
Stuttering is a chronic communication disorder that interferes with a person's ability to speak fluently.
Some people who stutter are very often qualified for and interested in positions requiring them to deal with members of the public on a daily basis.
People who stutter should be honest and open with their employers about their speaking abilities and the areas in which they feel they can perform effectively.
www.stutteringhelp.org /answremp.htm   (714 words)

  
 Fluency & Stuttering
Stuttering is a communication impairment characterized by excessive, involuntary disruptions in the rate, rhythm and forward flow of speech.
Direct intervention (stuttering therapy) with preschool as well as school-age children can be very effective when managed by a speech/language pathologist trained and experienced in working with stuttering children.
Stuttering is a condition which, at some time, will affect 5% of children, although it persists in only 1%.
www.hsdc.org /Child/Speech/stutter.htm   (791 words)

  
 ASHA: Questions & Answers about Stuttering
Stuttering is the condition in which the flow of speech is broken by abnormal stoppages (no sound), repetitions (st-st-stuttering), or prolongations (ssssstuttering) of sounds and syllables.
Children who stutter are no more likely to have psychological problems than children who do not stutter.
Stuttering typically begins at a very early age (usually between 2 and 5 years), but will occasionally appear for the first time in a school-age child and, more rarely, in an adult.
www.kidsource.com /asha/stuttering.html   (562 words)

  
 Stuttering
The person may feel that he or she is continuing to stutter because of something that he or she did not do.
The parent's of a child who stutters do not want their child to stutter and are sometimes unaware that the child is not stuttering on purpose.
When a child who stutters wants to answer a question, he or she may use different words than they normally would in an attempt to avoid difficult words.
www.d.umn.edu /~cspiller/stutteringpage/julie.htm   (917 words)

  
 Health Information - Yale Medical Group
Stuttering, sometimes referred to as stammering, is a speech disorder.
True stuttering may occur in a child that has some normal developmental speech problems who is then pressured to speak better.
Although stuttering may cause emotional problems, it is not believed to be the result of emotional problems.
ymghealthinfo.org /content.asp?pageid=P02290   (902 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is interrupted by:
The person who is stuttering may frequently blink the eyes and/or have abnormal facial or upper body movements in an attempt to speak.
Considerable current evidence suggests that stuttering is caused by problems in the part of the brain which controls the timing of speech muscle activation.
www.mbmc.org /healthgate/GetHGContent.aspx?token=9c315661-83b7-472d-a7ab-bc8582171f86&chunkiid=11528   (474 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering, sometimes referred to as stammering or diffluent speech, is a speech disorder.
The exact mechanical causes of stuttering are not completely understood, but it is thought to be a hereditary condition.
Psychogenic stuttering is believed to originate in the area of the brain that directs thought and reasoning.
www.guthrie.org /healthinfo/Topics/content.asp?pageid=P00470   (818 words)

  
 Stuttering
Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the person either repeats particular words and syllables while saying them or finds it difficult to begin certain words.
The psychological side effects of stuttering that often occur, such as fear of speaking to strangers or in public, may also be addressed.
NIDCD says stuttering characteristics are being examined to help identify groups of individuals who have similar types of stuttering and therefore may have a common cause behind their stuttering.
www.stayinginshape.com /3osfcorp/libv/k13.shtml   (622 words)

  
 Stuttering
If stuttering is not treated in the preschool years, it starts to become intractable during later years.
It was once assumed that a child's stuttering was caused by parents who mistakenly thought that their child had begun to stutter.
It was proposed that overanxious parents, who believed this was stuttering, pressured their child to talk properly and caused the child to start 'real' stuttering.
www.disability.vic.gov.au /dsonline/dsarticles.nsf/pages/Stuttering?OpenDocument   (892 words)

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