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Topic: Subdivisions of England


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  England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
England is named after the Angles, one of a number of Germanic tribes believed to have originated in Angeln in Northern Germany, who settled in England in the 5th and 6th centuries.
The Norman conquest of England, as depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry
England comprises the central and southern two-thirds of the island of Great Britain, plus offshore islands of which the largest is the Isle of Wight.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/England   (4826 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
England is the largest, the most populous, and the most densely populated of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom (UK), and is often considered a country or nation in its own right.
England is named after the Angles, one of a number of Germanic peoples who settled there in the 5th and 6th centuries.
England is both the most populous and the most ethnically diverse nation in the United Kingdom with around 49 million inhabitants, of which roughly a tenth are from non-White ethnic groups.
hallencyclopedia.com /England   (3892 words)

  
 England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
England is one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom (along with Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales).
England has land borders with Wales and Scotland, and elsewhere it is bounded by the sea.
England is named after the Angles, from the German region Angeln, one of a number of Germanic tribes who settled there in the 5th and 6th centuries.
www.newlenox.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/England   (4365 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
England is the largest, the most populous, and the most densely populated of the nations that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
School histories of England tend to begin with the accession of William the Conqueror in 1066.
England is both the most populous and the most ethnically diverse country in the United Kingdom with around 49 million inhabitants, of which roughly a tenth are from non-White ethnic groups.
usapedia.com /e/england.html   (1126 words)

  
 Subdivisions of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A map of England with shire counties pink, metropolitan and London boroughs purple, and unitary authorities red.
England is divided into four types of county level subnational entities.
Similar referendums in North West England and Yorkshire and the Humber have been postponed indefinitely: on 8 November 2004 the Deputy Prime Minister announced "I will not therefore be bringing forward orders for referendums in either the North West, or Yorkshire and the Humber".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Subdivisions_of_England   (688 words)

  
 Regions of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
England is divided into nine regions each containing one or more county level entities.
The regions were created in 1994 by John Major's government and from 1996 have been used as England's European Parliament constituencies and as statistical NUTS level 1 regions.
A referendum was held in the North East region of England on November 4, 2004; in it the voters rejected the proposal that this region should have an elected regional assembly.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Regions_of_England   (968 words)

  
 subdivisions of the united kingdom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
England and Wales are grouped into England and Wales for legal purposes.
The first level of administrative subdivision in England is the region, which have a limited existence.
England was traditionally divided into 39 traditional counties, which are still used for some cultural purposes.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Subdivisions_of_the_United_Kingdom.html   (303 words)

  
 England
Saint George's flag England (formerly the Kingdom of England up to its merger with Scotland in 1707, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain) is the largest and most densely populated of the nations that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
England comprises most of the southern half of the island of Great Britain, bordered to the north by Scotland and to the west by Wales.
According to the 2001 census the population of England was 49,138,831.
www.findword.org /en/england.html   (687 words)

  
 ipedia.com: England Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The country of England (as distinct from the states and provinces which had occupied the same territory at earlier times) formed through the gradual merging of the Angle, Saxon and Jute kingdoms during the 7th to 9th centuries.
England, as a significant political entity, ceased to exist with the Act of Union with the Kingdom of Scotland in 1707, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain.
England comprises most of the southern two-thirds of the island of Great Britain, plus offshore islands of which the largest is the Isle of Wight.
www.ipedia.com /england.html   (2321 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
From the late 13th century, the neighbouring principality of Wales was joined to England, and gradually came to be a part of that kingdom for most legal purposes, although in the modern era it is more usually thought of as a separate nation (fielding, for example, its own athletic teams).
The history of England as an independent country stretches on through the middle ages and renaissance to the reign of Elizabeth I, often remembered as a golden age in its history, notable both for its culture and mercantile success.
England ceased to be an independent political entity with the Act of Union with the Kingdom of Scotland in 1707, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/en/England.htm   (2871 words)

  
 Administrative counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Administrative counties were a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government in England from 1889 to 1974.
They were replaced by the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England which are often referred to, somewhat incorrectly, as administrative counties.
In 1894 a uniform two-tier system was established, with subdivisions of the administrative counties called urban districts, rural districts and municipal boroughs.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Administrative_counties_of_England   (700 words)

  
 England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
England should not be confused with the United Kingdom or the island of Great Britain.
It is of interest to note that England is far from being an independent nation since it has no national government, has no currency of its own, has no armed forces, and is not represented in the Olympic Games.
England's five largest cities (in decreasing order of size) are; London, Birmingham, Liverpool, Sheffield and Leeds.
www.indexlistus.de /keyword/England.php   (1411 words)

  
 Subdivisions of England - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
For local government purposes, England is divided into three types of areas - non-unitary authorities, unitary authorities, and London boroughs.
As part of the referendum, voters were to be asked to choose which system of unitary authorities they would like to see in the existing county council areas if the regional assemby was approved.
Most of the proposed changes would have required no change in the administrative counties of England, as they could have been be implemented by merging districts and abolition of the county council.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Subdivisions_of_England   (934 words)

  
 Regions of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Historically the primary subdivision of England was into counties, which still exist in modified form.
The Labour Government announced that it wished to increase the power of government at the regional level, as part of the "devolution" that led to elected assemblies in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and part of the concept of regions in the EU.
The government proposed to hold referendums in the three northern regions of North West England, North East England and Yorkshire and the Humber first.
www.bonneylake.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Regions_of_England   (1035 words)

  
 Knowledge King - Subdivisions of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
For local government purporses, England is divided into three types of areas - non-unitary authorities, Unitary Authorities, and London boroughs.
Greater London has no county council; the 32 borough councils are the highest authority, although the Greater London Authority exists to coordinate their activities.
England is also divided into governmental regions: Greater London, South East England, South West England, East of England, East Midlands, West Midlands, North West England, Yorkshire and the Humber and North East England.
www.knowledgeking.net /encyclopedia/s/su/subdivisions_of_england.html   (300 words)

  
 regions of england   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The region (sometimes known as Government Office Region) is currently the highest level of local government in England.
The present policy of the UK Government is to increase the power of government at the regional level, as part of the "devolution" that led to elected assemblies in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and part of the concept of regions in the EU.
In accordance with this, referendums will be held on whether to establish directly-elected regional assemblies in the three northern regions of North West England, North East England and Yorkshire and the Humber.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Regions_of_England.html   (814 words)

  
 Talk:Subdivisions of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The reference used here is the CIA World Fact Book, and even if I do not doubt that the facts are correct, my experience is that it can sometimes be structured in an archetypical way, which may lead to misinterpretation.
I am just surprised over the lack of structure for the articles on the subdivisons of England and the UK and this is what I'm trying to adress.
We also have a bunch of Ceremonial counties of England, which are the ones people use geographically today.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Subdivisions_of_England   (545 words)

  
 Subdivisions of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Referendums are due to be held on November 4, 2004 in North East England, North West England and Yorkshire and the Humber about whether elected regional assemblies should be introduced.
As part of the referendum, voters will be asked to choose which system of unitary authorities they would like to see in the existing county council areas.
Most of the proposed changes will require no change in the administrative counties of England, as they can be implemented by merging districts and abolition of the county council.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/subdivisions_of_england   (825 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
There are calls by some for an English Parliament but the current Labour government favours the establishment of regional governments, claiming that England is too large to be governed as a sub-state entity.
In some regions, notably the south-west and south-east there is little interest, but in the north of England there is some support.
Considerable disquiet was caused when changes were made to the system of counties in 1889.
www.icyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/e/en/england.html   (1433 words)

  
 Subdivisions of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
For local government purposes, England is divided into three types of areas -non-unitary authorities, unitary authorities, and London boroughs.
Non-unitary authorities are administrative counties with a two-tier structure,consisting of a county council and a number of district councils.
England is also divided into governmental regions : Greater London, South East England, South WestEngland, East of England, East Midlands, West Midlands, North West England, Yorkshire and the Humber and North East England.
www.therfcc.org /subdivisions-of-england-15951.html   (807 words)

  
 Articles - Subdivisions of the United Kingdom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
This structure was formed by the political union between the formerly separate kingdoms of England and Scotland, the principality of Wales and the province of Northern Ireland, each of which has a unique political status.
England and Wales are treated as a single entity for some purposes, principally that they share a legal system, while Scotland and Northern Ireland each have a separate legal system.
As a whole, executive government in Northern Ireland is currently administered by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and laws are made in the United Kingdom Parliament - known as "direct rule" in contrast to devolution.
www.gaple.com /articles/Subdivisions_of_the_United_Kingdom   (540 words)

  
 England - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
England (formerly the Kingdom of England up to its merger with Scotland in 1707, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain) is the largest and most densely populated of the nations that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
It was a slang term used by English soldiers in India, derived from a Hindustani phrase, bila yati, meaning "foreign" (especially European).
England is also sometimes referred to by its inhabitants as "this Green and Pleasant Land", after William Blake's poem Jerusalem.
openproxy.ath.cx /en/England.html   (324 words)

  
 Bristol - SmartyBrain Encyclopedia and Dictionary   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
In 1373 Edward III of England proclaimed "that the said town of Bristol withall be a County by itself and called the county of Bristol for ever", but maps usually instead show it as part of Gloucestershire, and as the city spilled south of the river, it took the county with it.
By the 14th Century Bristol was England's third-largest town (after London and York), with perhaps 15-20,000 inhabitants on the eve of the Black Death of 1348-49.
Renewed growth came with the 17th Century rise of England's American colonies and the rapid 18th Century expansion of England's part in the Atlantic trade in Africans taken for slavery in the Americas.
smartybrain.com /index.php/Bristol   (1969 words)

  
 Traditional_counties_of_England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The traditional counties of England are historic subdivisions of the country into around 40 regions.
After local government reform in the late 19th century, the traditional counties are no longer in general use for official geographic purposes (in favour of ceremonial counties or administrative counties), but the system in use is partially based on them, and the postal counties often still follow them.
In southern England, they were subdivisions of the Kingdom of Wessex, and in many areas represented annexed, previously independent, kingdoms — such as Kent (from the Kingdom of Kent).
www.tuxedo-shop.com /search.php?title=Traditional_counties_of_England   (2561 words)

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