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Topic: Subdivisions of Scotland


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In the News (Tue 20 Aug 19)

  
  Article Scotland | Scottish gifts, kilts and accessories
Scotland's legal, educational and judicial systems continue to be separate from those of England and Wales and Northern Ireland, and because of this it constitutes a discrete jurisdiction in public and in private international law.
The territorial extent of Scotland is generally that established by the 1237 Treaty of York between Scotland and England and the 1266 Treaty of Perth between Scotland and Norway.
The population of Scotland in the 2001 census was 5,062,011.
www.scotlandshopdirect.com /p,scotland,page.php   (5758 words)

  
  Church of Scotland - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The Church of Scotland (CofS, known informally as The Kirk, Eaglais na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the national church of Scotland.
The Church of Scotland was (and is) a firm opponent of nuclear weaponry.
The Church of Scotland is Presbyterian in polity, and Reformed in theology.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Church_of_Scotland   (3013 words)

  
 Scotland - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Scotland is represented in the British House of Commons by 59 MPs elected from territory-based Scottish constituencies.
Scotland's only land border is with England, and runs for 96 kilometres (60 miles) between the River Tweed on the east coast and the Solway Firth in the west.
The territorial extent of Scotland is generally that established by the 1237 Treaty of York between Scotland and England and the 1266 Treaty of Perth between Scotland and Norway.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Scotland   (7991 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Scotland's legal system continues to be separate from those of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; and Scotland still constitutes a discrete jurisdiction in public and in private international law.
The founders of Scotland of late medieval legend, Scota with GoĆ­del Glas, voyaging from Egypt, as depicted in a 15th century manuscript of the Scotichronicon of Walter Bower.
Scotland's wildlife is typical of the north west of Europe although several of the larger mammals such as the Brown Bear, Wolf, Eurasian Lynx, Beaver, Reindeer, Elk and Walrus were hunted to extinction in historic times.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Scotland   (4805 words)

  
  Scotland
Scotland ('' Alba '' in Gaelic) is a nation in northwest Europe and a constituent country of the United Kingdom.
Scotland's only land border is with England, and runs for 96 kilometres (60 mile s) between the River Tweed on the east coast and the Solway Firth in the west.
The territorial extent of Scotland is generally that established by the 1237 Treaty of York between Scotland and England and the 1266 Treaty of Perth between Scotland and Norway.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Scotland   (6295 words)

  
 Scotland - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
Scotland (Alba in Gaelic) is a nation in northwest Europe and a constituent country of the United Kingdom.
The Kingdom of Scotland was united in 843, by King Kenneth I of Scotland, and is thus one of the oldest still-existing countries in the world.
Scottish sundial — the renaissance sundials of Scotland.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/s/c/o/Scotland.html   (5679 words)

  
 Untitled ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
Scotland's legal system continues to be separate from those of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; and Scotland still constitutes a discrete jurisdiction in public and in private law.
From a base of territory in eastern Scotland north of the River Forth and south of the River Oykel, the kingdom acquired control of the lands lying to the north and south.
Scotland's wildlife is typical of the north west of Europe although several of the larger mammals such as the Brown Bear, Wolf, Eurasian Lynx, Beaver, Reindeer, Elk and Walrus were hunted to extinction in historic times.
www.downes.ca /cgi-bin/page.cgi?topic=127   (4618 words)

  
 Subdivisions of Scotland - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities.
Before then the administrative division was the region (pointedly not called counties, unlike their cousins in England and Wales), with a further subdivision of the district; this scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
Scotland has several other administrative divisions, which are handled by joint boards of the councils.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Subdivisions_of_Scotland   (136 words)

  
 The Ultimate Scotland - American History Information Guide and Reference
Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom.
Scotland has a land boundary with England on the island of Great Britain and is otherwise bounded by seas and oceans.
Scotland's territorial extent is generally that established by the 1237 Treaty of York between Scotland and England and the 1266 Treaty of Perth between Scotland and Norway.
www.historymania.com /american_history/Scotland   (4198 words)

  
 Cities and Towns - Hometown England
Many of the place-names in England and to a lesser extent Scotland are derived from celtic British names, including London, Dumbarton, York, Dorchester, Dover and Colchester.
The conquest of Wales was achieved in the 13th century, when it was annexed to England and gradually came to be a part of that kingdom for most legal purposes, although in the modern era it is more usually thought of as a separate nation (fielding, for example, its own athletic teams).
It is bordered to the north by Scotland and to the west by Wales.
www.hometownengland.com   (6247 words)

  
 Subdivisions of Scotland Information
For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as "Council Areas" which are all governed by unitary authorities, 31 of which are designated as "Councils" and one "Comhairle".
Before 1996 the local government divisions of Scotland were regions and districts (each region consisting of a number of districts) and unitary island council areas; that scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
Scotland has several other administrative divisions, some of which are handled by joint boards of the councils.
www.bookrags.com /Subdivisions_of_Scotland   (388 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Peckham's   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in Scotland Abbeys and priories in Scotland...
Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh in Gaelic) was one of the regional council areas of Scotland from 1974 to 1996.
Category: Retail corporation stubs Glasgow (or Glaschu in Gaelic) is Scotlands largest city and unitary council, situated on the River Clyde in the countrys west central lowlands.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Peckham%27s   (701 words)

  
 Place talk:Scotland - Genealogy
The gist is that Scottish local government was substantially reorganized in 1975 and again in 1995, such that the official geographic subdivisions of Scotland used by the government today are rather different from those used prior to 1975.
Place:Birse (parish), Aberdeenshire, Scotland -- for the parish of Birse
Place:Birse, Aberdeenshire, Scotland -- for the parish of Birse
www.werelate.org /wiki/Place_talk:Scotland   (3523 words)

  
 Buy or Sell Property in Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is one of the constituent countries[1] of the United Kingdom.
Scotland is not, however, a sovereign state and does not enjoy direct membership of either the United Nations or the European Union.
The word Scot was borrowed from Latin and its use, to refer to Scotland, dates from at least the first half of the 10th century, when it first appeared in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as a reference to the Land of the Gaels, analogous to the Latin Scotia.
www.london-directory.biz /store/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1_55   (2590 words)

  
 Subdivisions
Subdivision is the process of subdividing something, usually land, into smaller pieces.
'': Subdivisions of the United Kingdom, NUTS regions in the United Kingdom, Counties of England, Administrative counties of England, Ceremonial counties of England, Traditional counties of England, Watsonian vice-counties, Districts of England'' This is a list of top-level councils.
Before then the administrative division was the ''region'' (pointedly not called counties, unlike their cousins in England and Wales), with a further subdivision of the ''district''; this scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
www.breadlike.com /pages7/84/subdivisions.html   (1462 words)

  
 SCOTLAND : Encyclopedia Entry
Scotland's legal system continues to be separate from those of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and Scotland still constitutes a discrete jurisdiction in public and in private international law.
Scotland's wildlife is typical of the north west of Europe although several of the larger mammals such as the Brown Bear, Wolf and Walrus were hunted to extinction in historic times.
Scotland has a highly developed western style open mixed economy which is closely linked with that of the rest of Europe and the wider world.
bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Scotland   (5479 words)

  
 Subdivisions of Scotland - Other subdivisions
Subdivisions of Scotland - Other subdivisions is one of the topics in focus at Global Oneness.
Subdivisions of Scotland - History of the subdivisions of Scotland.
Before 1996 the administrative division of Scotland was the region, with a further subdivision of the district; that scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
www.experiencefestival.com /subdivisions_of_scotland_-_other_subdivisions   (1280 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Subdivisions of Scotland Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities.
Before then the administrative division was the Region (pointedly not called counties, unlike their cousins in England and Wales), with a further subdivision of the district, this scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
Before then there existed administrative counties of Scotland, these being introduced in 1889.
www.ipedia.com /subdivisions_of_scotland.html   (165 words)

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