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Topic: Suez Canal


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  Suez Canal - LoveToKnow 1911
Trade between Egypt and countries to the east was originally overland to ports south of the Gulf of Suez; the proximity of the roadstead at the head of that gulf to Memphis and the Delta nevertheless marked it as the natural outlet for the Red Sea commerce of Lower Egypt.
After the closing of the canal in the 8th century it does not appear for certain that it was ever restored, although it is asserted that in the year r000 Sultan Hakim rendered it navigable.
Suez to such dimensions that the depth of water in it would be 22 metres at high Nile and at least i metre at low Nile.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Suez_Canal   (2556 words)

  
 Suez Canal - MSN Encarta
Suez Canal, artificial waterway running north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt; it connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea.
The canal utilizes three bodies of water—Lake Manzilah, Lake Timsāh, and the Bitter Lakes (the latter is actually one continuous body of water)—and is not the shortest distance across the isthmus.
Excavation of the canal was begun on April 25, 1859, and the canal was opened to navigation on November 17, 1869.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761578705/Suez_Canal.html   (604 words)

  
 Suez Canal - Encyclopedia.com
Suez: the canal before the crisis: Steve Morewood looks at the the Rise and Fall of British Dominance of the Suez Canal in the years 1882 to 1954.
Suez Canal is raking in the revenues: before the US invasion of Iraq last year, Egypt's Suez Canal Authority predicted that a fully-fledged war in the Middle East would disrupt regional maritime traffic, slashing canal revenues by 10% or more.
Suez reconsidered: Anthony Eden's Orientalism and the Suez crisis.(Biography)
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-SuezCana.html   (1759 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Suez Canal
The canal comprises seven parts, north and south of the Great Bitter Lake, linking the Mediterranean Sea to the Gulf of Suez on the Red Sea.
The canal stretches north and south across the Isthmus of Suez, between the cities of Port Said and Suez.
Canals were built to connect the Nile River and the Red Sea hundreds of years before the time of Christ.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Suez-Canal   (701 words)

  
 Suez Canal - Suez Canal of Egypt - World Forgotten Wonders
Suez canal is one of the most important canal in Egypt between Port Said on Mediterranean Sea and Suez port on Red Sea.
The Suez Canal located west of the Sinai Peninsula, is a 163-km-long (101 miles) and 300-m-wide (984 ft) maritime canal in Egypt between Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea and Suez on the Red Sea.
The speciality of the Suez canal is that it allows two-way north to south water transport between Europe and Asia without circumnavigation of Africa.
www.allwondersoftheworld.com /forgotten-wonders/suez-canal.html   (517 words)

  
 First World War.com - Battles - The Defence of the Suez Canal, 1915
Completed in 1869 and running north-south across the Suez Isthmus in Egypt to the Mediterranean in the Red Sea, its importance lay in its status as the quickest naval route between Europe and the countries around the Indian and western Pacific oceans: in short, between Britain and her colonies.
Nevertheless some 30,000 Indian army troops were belatedly applied to the canal's defence once Turkey's intention to enter the war on the side of the Central Powers became clear.
The focus of the defence effort was the railway junction at Ismailia, in the centre of the canal, and a clear target for attack.
www.firstworldwar.com /battles/suez.htm   (661 words)

  
  Suez Canal Tokens
The canal stretches north and south across the Isthmus of Suez, between the cities of Port Said and Suez.
Canals were built to connect the Nile River and the Red Sea hundreds of years before the time of Christ.
The Suez Canal Company was given a concession to operate the canal until 1968.
www.kiac-usa.com /SuezCanalTokens.html   (901 words)

  
  Suez Canal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Suez Canal (Arabic: قناة السويس, Qanā al-Suways), west of the Sinai Peninsula, is a 190-km-long (163 miles) and, at its narrowest point, 300-m-wide (984 ft) maritime canal in Egypt between Port Said (Būr Sa'īd) on the Mediterranean Sea, and Suez (al-Suways) on the Red Sea.
This caused Britain, France, and Israel to invade, in the week-long Suez Crisis of 1956.
In 1973, during the Yom Kippur War, the canal was the scene of a major crossing by the Egyptian army into Israeli-controlled Sinai; later, the Israeli army crossed the canal westward.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Suez_Canal   (1761 words)

  
 Suez Canal. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The canal was closed by Egypt during the Arab-Israeli War of 1967, after which it formed part of the boundary between Egypt and the Israeli-occupied Sinai peninsula.
After the Suez Canal was closed, many ships (especially tankers) were built that were too large for the canal, and alternate sea routes were used increasingly in world trade.
In Oct., 1973, Egyptian troops crossed the canal and attacked Israeli forces on the east bank of the canal; Israeli units crossed the canal to the west and eventually encircled the Egyptian Third Army.
www.bartleby.com /65/su/SuezCana.html   (786 words)

  
 Canal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Canals are so deeply identified with Venice that many canal cities have been nicknamed "the Venice of..." The city is built on marshy islands, with wooden piles supporting the buildings, so that here it is not so much the waterways which are man-made, as the land.
In Europe and then in the young United States, inland canals preceded the development of railroads during the earliest phase of the Industrial Revolution; some canals were later drained and used as railroad rights-of-way.
Canals have found another use in the 21st century, as wayleaves for fibre optic telecommunications networks.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Canal   (609 words)

  
 SUEZ CANAL - LoveToKnow Article on SUEZ CANAL   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Trade between Egypt and countries to the east was originally overland to ports south of the Gulf of Suez; the proximity of the roadstead at the head of that gulf to Memphis and the Delta nevertheless marked it as the natural outlet for the Red Sea commerce of Lower Egypt.
This canal diverged from the Nile near Bubastis and was carried along the Wadi Tumilat to Heroopolis, near Pithom, a port at the head of the Heroopolite Gulf (the Bitter Lakes of to-day).
Suez to such dimensions that the depth of water in it would be 21/2 metres at high Nile and at least I metre at low Nile.
77.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SU/SUEZ_CANAL.htm   (2439 words)

  
 Suez Canal
The canal is extensively used by modern ships, as it is the fastest crossing from the Atlantic Ocean to the Indian Ocean.
The canal cuts through 3 lakes, the Lake Manzala, in the north which is protected from the canal with a bedding on its western side, the Lake Timsah in the middle, and the Bitter Lakes further south.
13th century BCE: A canal is constructed between the Nile Delta and the Red Sea.
i-cias.com /e.o/suez_can.htm   (497 words)

  
 Suez Crisis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The canal was of strategic importance, being the ocean trade link between Britain and her colonies in India, the Far East as well as Australia and New Zealand.
The Suez Canal was the way most of the growing volumes of Persian Gulf oil got to Europe, cutting the 11,000 nautical mile (20,000 km) journey around the Cape of Good Hope to Southampton down to 6,500 nautical miles (12,000 km).
Along with Suez, the United States was also dealing with the near-simultaneous Soviet Hungary crisis, and faced the public relations embarrassment (especially in the eyes of the Third World) of criticizing the Soviet Union's military intervention there while not also criticizing its two principal European allies' actions.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Suez_Crisis   (2511 words)

  
 Suez Canal, Lesseps, Lessepsian Migration, Anti-Lessepsian, Red Sea
When the Suez Canal was opened in 1869 the waters of the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, which had been separated by the Isthmus of Suez, came into direct contact.
Fig.4 The Suez Canal is not in stable equilibrium with the surrounding seas and the pattern of temperature and salinity such as these are constantly changing with the seasons.
It is expected that in some cases, exchange of fauna and flora may have taken place before the opening of the Suez Canal as a result of the elevation of seal levels and undulations of the Isthmus during the Pleistocene.
www.sbg.ac.at /ipk/avstudio/pierofun/lm/lesseps.htm   (5055 words)

  
 Suez Canal, Egypt - Encyclopedia of Earth
The sandy desert of the northwest Sinai Peninsula occupies the territory east of the canal, and the large dark area west of the canal is the eastern extent of the Nile River Delta.
The Suez Canal is west of the Sinai Peninsula and serves as a two-way water transport route between Europe and Asia.
The Suez Canal was reclaimed by the Egyptians in the 1973 Arab-Israeli War and was reopened in 1975.
www.eoearth.org /article/Suez_Canal,_Egypt   (455 words)

  
 Suez Canal
Suez Canal, an artificial waterway running north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt; it connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea.
The Suez Canal shortens considerably the distance between East and West, for instance, 86% of the distance between the Saudi Port of Jeddah to the Black Sea port of Canstanza is saved if compared to the route round the Cape of Good Hope.
The Egyptian government has always been keen on improving and developing the performance of the Suez Canal in order to cope with the steady increase in maritime transport due to the huge capacity of tankers, giant cargo vessels and the ever increasing number of ships crossing the canal.
www.geocities.com /freighterman.geo/suez.html   (653 words)

  
 Suez Canal
The canal utilizes three bodies of water-Lake Manzilah, Lake Timsah, and the Bitter Lakes (the latter is actually one continuous body of water)-and is not the shortest distance across the isthmus.
Most of the canal is limited to a single lane of traffic, but several passing bays exist, and two-lane bypasses are located in the Bitter Lakes and between Al Qantarah and Ismailia.
The Suez Canal continued to figure prominently in the conflicts between Egypt and Israel during the 1960s and 1970s.
library.thinkquest.org /C007680/suezcanal.html   (850 words)

  
 Suez Canal, Information on the Suez Canal in Egypt
According to the Chronicle of the Pharaohs by Peter A. Clayton, under Necho II (610-595 BC) a canal was built between the Pelusian branch of the Nile and the northern end of the Bitter Lakes (which lies between the two seas) at a cost of, reportedly, 100,000 lives.
This canal is said to have been extended to the Red Sea by Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285-246 BC), abandoned during the early Roman rule, but rebuilt again by Trajan (98-117 AD) Over the next several centuries, it once again was abandoned and sometimes dredged by various rulers for various but limited purposes.
On November 17, 1869 the barrage of the Suez plains reservoir was breached and waters of the Mediterranean flowed into the Red Sea.
www.touregypt.net /suezcanal.htm   (1611 words)

  
 Not Your Average Engineer · Welcome
Roman historians record the abandonment of the canal during early Roman rule of Egypt, only to be rebuilt again by Trajan, Emperor of Rome during his 40 year reign spanning from 98 CE to 117 CE.
They regrouped in Paris and formed a canal association in 1846 to continue studying the possibility of a canal in hopes of a change of heart or the death of Mohammed Ali.
After delays for various international political incidents consisting of British and Egyptian military and economic opposition to canal construction, the barrage of the Suez Plains Reservoir was breached, allowing the waters of the Mediterranean to flow into the Red Sea.
www.oregonstate.edu /~vanbossd/suez.php   (1864 words)

  
 Modern Wonders: The Suez Canal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
On November 17, 1869, the Canal was officially inaugurated by Khedive Ismail in an extravagant and lavish ceremony.
The Suez Canal emerged on the political scene in 1956, during the Suez crisis.
In 1967, the Canal was closed at the wake of the Six-Day War, when Israel occupied the Sinai Peninsula, causing the Canal to act as a buffer zone between the fighting forces.
ce.eng.usf.edu /pharos/wonders/Modern/suezcanal.html   (622 words)

  
 The Suez Canal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As the Suez Canal was the only other canal of any significance in the world, today and when it was built, it is only right to portray its history.
The triumphant opening of the Suez Canal was performed by French Empress Eugenie on 17th November 1869 in the Imperial yacht Aigle.
All vessels were permitted to use the canal in times of war and peace; its entrances were not to be blockaded; no permanent fortifications were to be erected on its banks; no belligerent warships must disembark troops or munitions at its ports or anywhere along the canal.
www.russojapanesewar.com /lewis-5.html   (1329 words)

  
 High-Performance Real-Time IP Router
The canal is an open cut, without locks, and provides the shortest maritime route between Europe and the lands lying around the Indian and western Pacific oceans.
Suez is a high-performance router architecture that supports efficient packet forwarding while allowing the addition of new functions to the router in a safe and efficient manner.
The key goals of the Suez architecture are to develop a scalable system that meets both requirements, while maintaining strong protection and performance isolation guarantees between the core router functions and the dynamically added computation.
www.ecsl.cs.sunysb.edu /suez.html   (754 words)

  
 Suez Canal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Suez Canal (Qanâ el Suweis) west of the Sinai Peninsula forms a 163 km (101 mile) ship canal in Egypt between Port Said (Bûr Sa'îd) on the Mediterranean and Suez (El Suweis) on the Red Sea.
The success of the canal encouraged the to embark on building the Panama Canal a task that they were unable complete however.
The canal has no locks because there is no sea level The canal allows ships with up to m (50 feet) of draught to pass and improvements planned to increase this to 22 m feet) by 2010 to allow supertanker passage.
www.freeglossary.com /Suez_Canal   (717 words)

  
 Suez Canal
The Suez would be one- hundred and eighteen miles in length and sixty-four feet in depth and large enough to accommodate up to 150,000 tons to enter and proceed through (Cultures of the world Egypt, page 12).
The nationalization of the canal was on the 26th of July in 1956.
In 1967 to 1975 the canal was closed because of the Six Days War, the Israelis were using the Sinai Peninsula and the Suez was a buffer zone (The Suez Canal 1).
www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us /History/MidEast/02/dunn/dunn.htm   (1050 words)

  
 Middle East Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Canal is 120 miles long, and it is the longest canal in the world without locks.
The Canal's construction began in 1854 and was carried out by mostly Egyptian workers in conditions similar to slave labor.
The Canal was closed by Egypt until after they won the Yom Kippeur War of 1973 and halted the bloodshed in the Sinai.
www.library.cornell.edu /colldev/mideast/suez.htm   (1326 words)

  
 GardeningDaily - Suez Canal
The Suez Canal (Arabic, Qanā al-Suways), west of the Sinai Peninsula, forms a 163 km (118 miles) ship canal in Egypt between Port Said (Būr Sa'īd) on the Mediterranean and Suez (al-Suways) on the Red Sea.
In 1300 BC a "Suez Canal" was dug between the River Nile and the Mediterranean Sea.
In the 1973 Yom Kippur War the canal was the scene of a major crossing of the Egyptian army into Israeli controlled Sinai, and later during the war was also crossed to the west by the Israeli army.
www.gardeningdaily.com /flowers-and-plants/Suez_Canal   (991 words)

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