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Topic: Suger


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  Abbot Suger
Suger's rebuilding of the church exemplifies the desire to get closer to this "one true light" in his use of heightened architecture as well as by his passion for light in the church.
According to Panofsky, Suger desired the wealth of his cathedral to be superior to that of the basilica at Hagia Sofia in Constantinople.
Abbot Suger on the Abbey Church of Saint-Denis and Its Treasures.
www.athenapub.com /14suger.htm   (860 words)

  
  Abbot Suger
In 1118 he was sent by Louis VI to the court of Pope Gelasius II at Maguelonne[?], and lived from 1121 to 1122 at the court of his successor, Calixtus II.
Suger was the friend and counsellor both of Louis VI and Louis VII.
Suger was the foremost historian of his time.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ab/Abbot_Suger.html   (434 words)

  
 Suger - LoveToKnow 1911
Suger was the friend and counsellor both of Louis VI.
He urged the king to destroy the feudal bandits, was responsible for the royal tactics in dealing with the communal movements, and endeavoured to regularize the administration of justice.
Suger's works served to imbue the monks of St Denis with a taste for history, and called forth a long series of quasi-official chronicles.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Suger   (531 words)

  
 suger.html
Abbot of Saint-Denis from 1122 to 1151, Suger is one of the most interesting representatives of French monastic culture in the 12th century, combining an extraordinary devotion to his monastery with an understanding of the weaknesses and potential strengths of the kings of France.
Suger was born of a modest knightly family probably not too far from Saint-Denis and was given as an oblate to the abbey.
Suger tells us how as a youth he used to look at the abbey's muniments and how he was aware not only of the domains now lost that the abbey had once possessed, but also how through mismanagement it was receiving much less revenue than it should.
www.utexas.edu /depts/french/web/Vessely/vessely/suger.html   (697 words)

  
 Abbot Suger of St.-Denis Biography | scit_0212345_package.xml
Suger, through his promotion of the redesign and reconstruction of the Abbey Church of St. Denis, near Paris, France, is regarded as the originator of gothic architecture.
Suger's life's project was to enlarge, beautify, and rebuild the Abbey Church of St.-Denis.
Suger was as strict a disciplinarian as Bernard, and followed the Benedictine rule methodically, but still claimed that the more extravagant the church and its fittings, the greater the gift to God, and the greater the glory of God.
www.bookrags.com /biography/abbot-suger-of-st-denis-scit-0212345   (721 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Abbot Suger on his Administration
Suger was born in 1081 of a very minor knightly family He was dedicated to the abbey of St. Denis at the age of nine or ten and came to see himself as its adopted child.
Thus Suger decided improvement was in order and in that year he began work on the west end of the church, building a new facade with two towers and three doors.
For Suger, of course, the primary significance of his church was neither political nor architectural but religious, insofar as he could separate the three.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/sugar.html   (5053 words)

  
 Suger - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
SUGER [Suger], 1081-1151, French cleric and statesman, abbot of Saint-Denis from 1122, minister of kings Louis VI and Louis VII.
Born into a peasant family and educated at the abbey of Saint-Denis, Suger was noted for his financial ability and his talent for conciliation.
He liberated the abbey at Saint-Denis from the tribute formerly paid to exploiters, recovered alienated properties, built a new church, and enriched it with works of art; the church is sometimes considered the first great work of Gothic architecture.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-suger.html   (344 words)

  
 Philolog: Abbé Suger and a Medieval Theory of Light: Lux, Lumen, Illumination
Because “In Suger’s vision, light was the primary source of faith and divine inspiration”, (7) this light was one agency of a powerful benevolent grace that fed the soul.
Suger’s programmatic typology of windows also followed another allegory with its dominant use of two primary colors, not coincidentally the first two gems of the New Jerusalem, jasper (normally red) and sapphire (blue) in Revelation 21:19.
Thus, what Suger and his immediate successors, especially in France, understood intuitively as a mysterious allegory of red and blue hues and their metaphorical tensions, physics now presents as optical reality: the tension is sublime.
traumwerk.stanford.edu /philolog/2006/01/abbe_sugers_theory_of_light_lu.html   (1704 words)

  
 Chalice of the Abbot Suger of Saint-Denis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Acquired by Abbot Suger for the French royal abbey of Saint-Denis, near Paris, the stone cup was set in gold and probably used in the consecration ceremony for the new altar chapels of the church on 11 June 1144.
Suger, abbot of Saint-Denis from 1122 to 1151, was not only a Benedictine monk but also a brilliant administrator who served as regent of France during the Second Crusade.
The cup incorporated in Abbot Suger's chalice was carved from sardonyx, probably in Alexandria, Egypt during the second to first centuries B.C. Suger's goldsmiths mounted the cup in a gold and silver setting with delicate gold-wire filigree and adorned it with gems.
www.nga.gov /collection/gallery/medieval/medieval-1443.0.html   (257 words)

  
 Discover Paris! - May 2004 - Suger's Treasures
Abbot Suger, the ecclesiastical administrator of the Saint Denis abbey and basilica from 1121 to 1151, strove to enhance the prestige of his abbey and to increase his influence in royal affairs.
A skillful and ambitious administrator, Suger set about to reform the abbey and rebuild the basilica, which had fallen into decay by the time that he was elected abbot.
Although Suger was criticized by some, particularly by the austere Bernard, founder of the abbey of Clairvaux, for amassing sumptuous treasures at his basilica, he defended his belief that gold and precious objects help man exalt his spirit.
www.discoverparis.net /Sugers-Treasures.html   (677 words)

  
 Sample Suger paper
Suger's portrayal of Louis VI was a portrayal of a warrior-king, one who led his troops vigorously and in person until his failing health prevented him from doing so.
Once this youthful warrior became "king-designate" as Suger terms him, he spent his time, at least according to Suger, in a series of pitched battles against the castellan lords of the region, forcing them to recognize his authority and to stop their attacks on the defenseless.
Overall, Suger's praise for the his king's military abilities indicates the central value he put on having a brave king who was not afraid to fight and who had the strength and ability almost always to win.
gozips.uakron.edu /~brittai/Suger.html   (871 words)

  
 Suger
Suger was the friend and counsellor both of Louis VI and Louis VII.
He urged the king to destroy the feudal bandits, was responsible for the royal tactics in dealing with the communal movements, and endeavored to regularize the administration of justice.
Suger's works served to imbue the monks of St. Denis with a taste for history, and called forth a long series of quasi-official chronicles.
www.nndb.com /people/274/000097980   (435 words)

  
 Abbot Suger Summary
In 1118 Louis VI sent Suger to the court of Pope Gelasius II at Maguelonne, and he lived from 1121 to 1122 at the court of Gelasius's successor, Calixtus II.
Suger served as the friend and counsellor both of Louis VI and Louis VII.
He urged the king to destroy the feudal bandits, was responsible for the royal tactics in dealing with the communal movements, and endeavoured to regularize the administration of justice.
www.bookrags.com /Abbot_Suger   (1206 words)

  
 Abbot Suger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Suger was born into a poor family and in 1091 was brought to the nearby abbey of Saint-Denis for education.
On his return from Italy Suger became abbot of St Denis.
Suger became the foremost historian of his time.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Abbot_Suger   (518 words)

  
 No. 825: Gothic Cathedral
The other was Suger, born poor and given to a monastery by his father.
Suger became the politically powerful Abbot of the St-Denis monastery.
Suger made monastic reforms that satisfied Bernard, but the two were far apart in spirit.
www.uh.edu /engines/epi825.htm   (613 words)

  
 Suger of Saint Denis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Suger was born in 1081 of a very minor knightly family He was dedicated to the abbey of St. Denis at the age of nine or ten and came to see himself as its adopted child.
For the glory of the church which nurtured and raised him, Suger strove for the glory of the church, Sharing with you what is yours, oh martyr Denis.
In the same year, cheered by so holy and auspicious a work, we hurried to begin on the upper part of the chamber of divine atonement, in which the perpetual and frequent victim of our redemption should be sacrificed in secret without disturbance by the crowds.
www.artist-at-large.com /saintdenis2.htm   (6263 words)

  
 Suger on Saint-Denis
Suger was born in 1081 of a very minor knightly family.
He was dedicated to the abbey of St. Denis at the age of nine or ten and came to see himself as its adopted child.
Suger strove for the glory of the church,
faculty.juniata.edu /tuten/suger.html   (973 words)

  
 Abbot Suger Excerpts from De Administratione
As the Abbot of the French Royal Abbey of St. Denis, north of Paris, Suger was responsible for the redesign of the west facade and the east end of the church.
Suger's discussions of his additions are relevant to our discussion of the art of the medieval church treasury.
On either side, we installed there the two candlesticks of King Louis, the son of Philip, of twenty marks of gold, lest they might be stolen on some occasion; we added hyacinths, emeralds, and sundry precious gems; and we gave orders carefully to look out for others to be added further.
employees.oneonta.edu /farberas/arth/arth212/Liturgical_Objects/Suger_excerpts.html   (663 words)

  
 Abt Suger
Suger wurde in der Umgebung der Abtei von Saint-Denis bei Paris geboren und kam schon als Kind in die Abtei.
Er war zwar kein Architekt, bestimmte jedoch das Aussehen des Baus entscheidend, wie er in "Libellus de conversatione ecclesiae S. Dionysii" und "De rebus in administrationem sua gestis" überliefert.
Eager to press on my success, since I wished nothing more under heaven than to seek the honor of my mother church which with maternal affection had suckled me as a child.
www.kunstwissen.de /fach/f-kuns/a_mit/suger0.htm   (549 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Suger
Although the crusade ended in failure, Suger equipped an army and was about to depart for the Holy Land when he died.
As a statesman he sought to strengthen the royal power, to improve agriculture, commerce, and trade, and to reform the administration of justice.
The complete works of SUGER are in P. Copyright © 2007 by Kevin Knight.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14326a.htm   (441 words)

  
 Abbot Suger, the Cathedral of St. Denis, the history of art....
George Heard Hamilton, lectured to us about Abbot Suger seeing the beautiful objects made of precious materials with which he furnished the church, as symbolizing God and, by their radiant beauty, drawing persons' attention up above earthly matters to higher, Heavenly things.
I was a student needing to get a good grade in History of Art I so that I would not suffer the undesirable consequences of "flunking out of school" (which, at the time, included likelihood of being sent to Vietnam as an infantry soldier...).
Neither had I been taught to expect meaning in my life, in Abbot Suger's radiant religious objects or anywhere else, even after the teacher said there was meaning in Abbot Suger's precious objects (and the things they symbolized).
www.users.cloud9.net /~bradmcc/Suger.html   (746 words)

  
 Suger — Infoplease.com
Born into a peasant family and educated at the abbey of Saint-Denis, Suger was noted for his financial ability and his talent for conciliation.
In 1147, Louis VII left on crusade and appointed a council of regency, of which Suger was the leading member.
During his administration (1147–49) Suger succeeded in maintaining peace at home and in raising funds to meet the king's expenses.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0847126.html   (329 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Abbot Suger of St.-Denis: Church and State in Early 12th-Century France: Books: Lindy Grant   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Based on a fresh reading of primary sources, Lindy Grant's comprehensive biography of Abbot Suger (1081-1151) provides a reassessment of a key figure of the twelfth century.
Active in secular and religious affairs alike - Suger was Regent of France and also abbot of one of the most important abbeys in Europe during the time of the Gregorian reforms.
But he is primarily remembered as a great artistic patron whose commissions included buildings in the new Gothic style.
www.amazon.ca /Abbot-Suger-St-Denis-Church-12th-Century/dp/0582051509   (376 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Abbot Suger on the Abbey Church of St. Denis and Its Art Treasures: Books: Abbot Suger,Erwin Panofsky,Gerda ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Dr. Panofsky is to be congratulated on producing, for the first time in any modern language, the whole of Suger's writing on St.-Denis, an unparalleled historical, archaeological, and ecclesiological text, and one of the world's literary treasures, a central pillar of the twelfth-century renaissance.
Suger, however, was frankly in love with splendor and beauty in every
Panofsky is explaining political, social and personal influences that together with Suger's psychological traits led to the construction of what is supposed to be the first Gothic catedral - St. Denis.
www.amazon.com /Abbot-Suger-Abbey-Church-Treasures/dp/0691003149   (1208 words)

  
 Maison Suger
Set in the heart of the Latin Quarter, the Maison Suger was created by the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l'Homme Foundation, a non-profit organization, to provide a welcoming work environment for foreign researchers who wish to spend time in Paris and work with their colleagues in the social sciences.
The Maison Suger is conveniently situated a few steps from the square Saint-André des Arts and the metro/RER stations of Saint-Michel and Notre-Dame with their direct rail links, via Roissy-Rail and Orly-Rail, to the two major airports.
The Fondation Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, many universities, the Collège de France, the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, and a number of libraries and research are all a short fifteen-minute walk from the Maison Suger.
www.columbia.edu /cu/reidhall/institut/suger.html   (345 words)

  
 Abbot Suger's de Administratione
LXI ff.) notes that this "treatise on the administration of Suger" only survives in a single manuscript (B.n.
In return for this one thing they promised us two benefits: to be worthy, by such a publication, of the instant and perpetual prayers of all our future brothers for the salvation of our soul, and to further by this example their zeal for the cult of the Church of God.
Thomas G. Waldman, "Abbot Suger and the Nuns of Argenteuil," Traditio XLI (1985): 239-272.]
www.ariadne.org /cc/sources/suger1.html   (8909 words)

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