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Topic: Sulfuric acid


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  ATSDR - ToxFAQs™: Sulfur Trioxide and Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric acid dissolves in the water in air and can remain suspended in air for varying periods of time.
Sulfuric acid is removed from the air in rain.
Sulfuric acid contributes to the formation of acid rain.
www.atsdr.cdc.gov /tfacts117.html   (1066 words)

  
  Sulfuric Acid - MSN Encarta
In 1740 the acid was produced successfully on a commercial scale by burning sulfur and potassium nitrate in a ladle suspended in a large glass globe partially filled with water.
When concentrated sulfuric acid is heated, it behaves also as an oxidizing agent, capable, for example, of dissolving such relatively unreactive metals as copper, mercury, and lead to produce metal sulfate, sulfur dioxide, and water.
The trioxide is dissolved in concentrated sulfuric acid, and at the same time a regulated influx of water maintains the concentration at a selected level usually about 95 percent.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761566936/Sulfuric_Acid.html   (879 words)

  
  Sulfuric acid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sulfuric acid is a constituent of acid rain, being formed by atmospheric oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the presence of water.
Sulfuric acid is produced in the upper atmosphere of Venus by the sun's photochemical action on carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor.
The standard first aid treatment for acid spills on the skin is, as for other corrosive agents, irrigation with large quantities of water: in the case of sulfuric acid it is important that the acid should be removed before washing, as a further heat burn could result from the exothermic dilution of the acid.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sulfuric_acid   (2660 words)

  
 Sulfuric acid Summary
Sulfuric acid is a constituent of acid rain, being formed by atmospheric oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the presence of water - i.e.
Sulfuric acid is produced in the upper atmosphere of Venus by the sun's photochemical action on carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor.
The standard first aid treatment for acid spills on the skin is, as for other corrosive agents, irrigation with large quantities of water: in the case of sulfuric acid it is important that the acid should be removed before washing, as a further heat burn could result from the exothermic dilution of the acid.
www.bookrags.com /Sulfuric_acid   (3924 words)

  
 Rapid cave formation by sulfuric acid dissolution
The sulfuric acid is formed by the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in hydrothermal water.
Sulfuric acid dissolution is not only postulated for the caves in the Guadaloupe Mountains, but it is thought that 10 % of known major caves worldwide were carved out by sulfuric acid.
Sulfuric acid reactions may also be related to the rapid formation of some hydrothermal alteration products and ore mineralisation.
www.answersingenesis.org /tj/v12/i3/cave.asp   (930 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric acid is a viscous, oily liquid and a strong acid which can cause severe burns.
Sulfuric acid is one of the components of acid rain.
Sulfuric acid is used in the production of phosphate fertilizers, for processing ores and wastewater, in the refining of oil and other petroleum products, and in the manufacture of some dyes.
www.windows.ucar.edu /physical_science/chemistry/sulfuric_acid.backup_CopyrightChange   (721 words)

  
 TRI Sulfuric
Sulfuric acid (H2SO4) is a colorless, odorless, oily liquid that is very corrosive and reacts chemically with many other materials and substances.
Sulfuric acid has a wide range of uses and is one of the world's most widely used industrial chemicals.
The amount of sulfuric acid released by an individual power plant depends on the sulfur content of the fuel it burns, as well as operating and air pollution control practices at the plant.
www.hepn.com /tri/sulfuric.htm   (494 words)

  
 Sulfuric acid in Australia
Sulfuric acid is an industrial acid used in Australia to manufacture phosphate (superphosphate) fertiliser (using imported phosphate rock).
The move to smelter-sourced acid is being driven by environmental improvements promoting the clean-up and recovery of sulfur dioxide in smelter off-gases to produce sulfuric acid.
Sulfuric acid availability in Western Australia was doubled in 1997 by the opening of Western Mining Corporation's new $A145 million plant alongside the Kalgoorlie nickel smelter 15km south of the Kalgoorlie-Boulder.
www.chemlink.com.au /sulfuric.htm   (2094 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid Spills in New York State
Sulfuric acid is strongly corrosive and exposure to the acid or its fumes can cause severe irritation or burns to the eye, skin or respiratory tract.
Sulfuric acid is a widely-used industrial chemical produced in large quantities.
Most sulfuric acid spills were reported (Table 2) during manufacture (38%), transport (21%), and at power generation facilities (15%) where the acid is used for cleaning boilers and piping by dissolving mineral deposits.
www.health.state.ny.us /environmental/chemicals/hsees/sulfuric.htm   (672 words)

  
 Chemical of the Week -- Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric acid is the product of the U.S. chemical industry produced in largest quantity in terms of mass.
The sulfur dioxide is oxidized to sulfur trioxide catalytically.
Therefore, concentrated sulfuric acid must be diluted by adding the acid slowly to cold water while the mixture is stirred to dissipate the heat.
scifun.chem.wisc.edu /chemweek/Sulf&top/Sulf&Top.html   (475 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid Release Paper - Quest Consultants Inc.
In the summer of 1991, an experimental program was conducted to determine the amount of equilibrium sulfuric acid that would pool, or fall to the ground, when the acid, both alone and as an emulsion with alkylation hydrocarbons, was released to the atmosphere.
In 1990, a comparison of HF and sulfuric acid alkylation risks (4) estimated that a release of a sulfuric acid/alkylation hydrocarbon emulsion could result in 10 to 65 percent of the sulfuric acid becoming airborne.
The volume fraction of acid and hydrocarbon composing each emulsion was determined by trapping a sample of the emulsion in a tubular sight glass, allowing the emulsion to separate, and reading the level of the acid/hydrocarbon interface.
www.questconsult.com /sulfuric.html   (5391 words)

  
 [No title]
Sulfuric acid molecules in atmospheric aerosols can act as sort of a force field by reflecting light and heat back into space, said Heather Allen, a study co-author and an assistant professor of chemistry at Ohio State.
In the eighteenth century sulfuric acid was in use in pharmacy for manufacture of Na2SO4 and for the removal of metals and metal oxide films by metal workers.
It is used as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, phosphoric acid, aluminum sulfate, ammonium sulfate, barium sulfate, copper sulfate, phenol, superphosphates and titanium dioxide.
www.lycos.com /info/sulfuric-acid--miscellaneous.html?page=2   (447 words)

  
 Sulfuric acid: Pumping up the volume
In the late 15th century, Basilius Valentinus described two ways to prepare sulfuric acid; one was by burning sulfur with potassium nitrate, or saltpeter, and the second was by distilling the acid from a mixture of silica and ferric sulfate (vitriol—hence the name “oil of vitriol” used by alchemists).
Until the 18th century, demand for sulfuric acid was slight; small amounts were consumed in preparing nitric and hydrochloric acids for use in treating or assaying nonferrous metals.
In the latter part of the 19th century, the demand for sulfuric acid expanded further as ammonium sulfate (used as a fertilizer) began to be made from ammoniacal liquors formed as a byproduct of gas works.
pubs.acs.org /subscribe/journals/tcaw/10/i09/html/09chemch.html   (1628 words)

  
 V-Day: Acid Attacks
In an acid attack, a man throws acid (the kind found in car batteries) on the face of a girl or woman.
Sulfuric acid is ubiquitous, being the basic, inexpensive ingredient for making lead acid batteries in all motorized vehicles all over the world.
Throwing of sulfuric acid on the face and body of young females has become an increasingly popular way of expressing anger or frustration by jilted men, some being jilted lovers, ex-husbands, and the like.
www.vday.org /contents/violence/glossary/acidattacks   (229 words)

  
 SULFURIC ACID
Sulfuric acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with good agricultural practice as a herbicide in the production of garlic and onions and as a potato vine desiccant in the production of potatoes.
Acetaldehyde and sulfuric acid: Acetaldehyde is polymerized violently by the concn acid.
N-Nitromethylamine and sulfuric acid: The nitroamine is decomposed explosively by concn sulfuric acid.
www.frankmckinnon.com /sulfuric_acid1.htm   (15448 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid Production
Sulfuric acid is the electrolyte used in lead-acid batteries (accumulators)
Concentrated sulfuric acid (18M) is used as a dehydrating agent, that is, to remove water, since it has a tendency to form hydrates such as H
Sulfuric acid is often used to dry neutral and acidic gases such as N
www.ausetute.com.au /sulfacid.html   (599 words)

  
 Acid Rain
Acid rain or acid snow is a direct result of the method that the atmosphere cleans itself.
The gases of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides are chemically converted into sulfuric and nitric acids.
These sulfuric acid droplets are one component of the summertime haze in the eastern U.S. Some sulfuric acid is formed directly in the water droplets from the reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide.
www.elmhurst.edu /~chm/vchembook/190acidrain.html   (544 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric acid is often prepared as a byproduct from mining operations.
Sulfuric acid is used as a drying agent to chemically remove water from many substances.
Sulfuric Acid Today is a biannual trade magazine covering uses for sulfuric acid in industry.
web.fccj.org /~ethall/h2so4/h2so4.htm   (641 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid Dilution
Sulfuric acid is one of the world's most widely used chemicals and finds numerous applications in the fertilizer, chemicals, water, dye and iron and steel industries.
Typically, the concentrated acid is fed down the inner of two concentric pipes while the dilution water is passed down the outer one.
The acid and water mix at the outlet of these pipes and then slowly flow up through a packed bed - in order to ensure good mixing and the avoidance of local hot spots - and exit from the chamber via an overflow pipe.
www.ddpsinc.com /ProcessProfiles/pp13.html   (347 words)

  
 [No title]
In their initial steps, both require the use of sulfur dioxide, which is produced by burning iron pyrites, FeS2, or sulfur, in air.
Sulfuric acid produced in this way, and labeled acid, is only about 62 to 70 percent H2SO4.
The occupational exposure limit for sulfuric acid aerosol in the USA is 1 mg/cu m, with no restriction as to droplet size.
www.lycos.com /info/sulfuric-acid.html   (568 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sulfuric acid is very corrosive and irritating and can cause direct effects on the skin, eyes, and respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts when there is direct exposure to sufficient concentrations.
Sulfuric acid is also regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.
In 1998, 759,914,346 pounds of Sulfuric acid waste were managed; 242,521,472 pounds were recycled on-site; 1,193,481 pounds were recycled off-site; 43,000 pounds were used for energy recovery on-site; 17,225 pounds were used for energy recovery off-site; 318,047,419 pounds were treated on-site; 4,533,585 pounds were treated off-site; and 193,558,164 pounds were released on-and off-site.
www.nsc.org /ehc/chemical/sulfuric.htm   (999 words)

  
 Occupational Illnesses and Injuries: Sulfuric Acid Facts
Sulfuric acid is most often used as a chemical intermediate to manufacture other chemicals and is also used for the pickling or cleaning of metal surfaces.
Sulfuric acid or sulfuric acid vapor, even with short-term exposure, can irritate the eyes and cause burning, swelling, tearing of the eyes and/or blurred vision, and may cause blindness.
Sulfuric acid should be stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area in tightly sealed containers protected from exposure to weather, extreme temperature changes, and physical damage.
www.epi.state.nc.us /epi/oii/sulfuricacid   (1794 words)

  
 Sulfuric Acid Facts
If ingested, sulfuric acid may cause damage to teeth, burning of the mouth, throat and stomach, nausea, vomiting of blood and eroded tissue, holes in the stomach and intestines, shock and kidney damage.
Sulfuric acid is not compatible with chlorates, chromates, carbides, fulminates, nitrates, picrates, cyanides, halides and powdered metals.
Contact of sulfuric acid with metal drums may cause the release of flammable and explosive hydrogen gas; therefore, storage drums should be coated with acid resistant material.
www.dhss.mo.gov /hsees/sulfuric.html   (970 words)

  
 Copper in Concentrated Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric acid is added, and the mixture is heated.
Though it is not a strongly oxidizing acid, concentrated sulfuric acid is a strong enough oxidizing agent to dissolve copper.
Sulfur dioxide is produced by reduction of the sulfuric acid.
jchemed.chem.wisc.edu /JCESoft/CCA/CCA3/MAIN/CUNASID/PAGE1.HTM   (401 words)

  
 Creation Science, Sulfuric Acid Cave Formation
The theory he is attacking is the fact that Carbonic Acid is the material responsible for the dissolving of the limestone into ground water, so that it can form caves, and stalactites/stalagmites.
The new theory uses sulfuric acid, and the author claims that sulfuric acid has been primarily responsible for excavating at least 10% of the caves in the Guadeloupe Mountains of southeastern New Mexico and west Texas.
Sulfuric acid dissolution is not only postulated for the caves in the Guadeloupe Mountains, but it is thought that 10 % of known major caves worldwide were carved out by sulfuric acid."
www.answersincreation.org /sulfuric.htm   (602 words)

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