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Topic: Sunga Empire


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In the News (Fri 28 Nov 14)

  
  US Bazaar.com : Encyclopedia Pages : Sunga dynasty
The capital of the Sungas was at Pataliputra.
Pushyamitra Sunga became the ruler of the Magadha and neighbouring territories.
Accounts of battles between the Greeks and the Sunga in Northwestern India are also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a group of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, during the latter's reign, in which the Indians repelled the Greeks.
encyclopedia.us-bazaar.com /?title=Sunga_dynasty   (1331 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Sunga Empire
The Sunga dynasty was established in 185 BCE, about 50 years after Ashoka's death, when the king Brhadrata, the last of the Mauryan rulers, was assassinated by the then commander-in-chief of the Mauryan armed forces, Pusyamitra Sunga, while he was taking the Guard of Honour of his forces.
Pusyamitra Sunga, a Brahmin, is believed by Buddhist scholars to have been hostile towards Buddhists and allegedly persecuted the Buddhist faith.
Accounts of battles between the Greeks and the Sunga in Central India are also found in the Mālavikāgnimitram, a play by Kālidāsa which describes a battle between a group of Greek cavalrymen and Vasumitra, the grandson of Pushyamitra, during the latter's reign, in which the Indians repelled the Greeks.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Sunga   (1105 words)

  
 Qwika - Kushan Empire
The empire was created by the Kushan tribe of the Yuezhi, a people from modern Xinjiang, China, possibly related to the Tocharians.
During the 1st and 2nd century, the Kushan Empire expanded militarily to the north and occupied parts of the Tarim Basin, their original grounds, putting them at the center of the profitable Central Asian commerce with the Roman Empire.
These remnants of the Kushan empire were ultimately wiped out in the 5th century by the invasions of the White Huns, and later the expansion of Islam.
wikipedia.qwika.com /wiki/Kushans   (2300 words)

  
 Political forms of Ancient India
Magadha’s king, Ajatashatru, was a ruthless ruler and caused the decline of Magadha empire.
The greatest empire in the fourth century AD was the Gupta empire, which ushered in the golden age of Indian history.
Sunga empire, again, failed to succeed and did not reach up to the level of Mauryan empire due to division of power.
www.onlineessays.com /essays/history/his181.php   (1783 words)

  
 Maurya Empire Summary
The Mauryan Empire was perhaps the greatest empire to rule the Indian subcontinent until the arrival of the British.
The assassination of Brhadrata and the rise of the Sunga empire led to a wave of persecution for Buddhists, and a resurgence of Hinduism.
Whereas both empires recognized the ruler and his ministers as the basis of social order, the first great emperor of India recognized that he had a dharma (duty) to protect his people; his reign was not supported by brute force alone.
www.bookrags.com /Maurya_Empire   (3766 words)

  
 Gupta Empire Summary
The Gupta empire's excellence in metallurgy is evidenced by the outdoor iron pillar near Delhi.
Despite the creation of the empire through war, the reign is remembered for its very influential style of Hindu art, literature, culture and science, especially during the reign of Chandra Gupta II.
The empire disintegrated under the attacks of Toramana and his successor, Mihirakula; the Hunas conquered several provinces of the empire, including Malwa, Gujarat, and Thanesar, broke away under the rule of local dynasties.
www.bookrags.com /Gupta_Empire   (3505 words)

  
 US Bazaar.com : Encyclopedia Pages : Mauryan empire
The Empire stretched to the north along the natural boundaries of the Himalayas, and to the east stretching into what is now Assam.
The assassination of Brhadrata and the rise of the Sunga empire led to a wave of persecution for Buddhists
Although the extent of their successes against indigenous powers such as the Sungas, Satavahanas, and Kalingas are unclear, what is clear is that Scythian tribes, renamed Indo-Scythians, brought about the demise of the Indo-Greeks from around 70 BCE and retained lands in the trans-Indus, the region of Mathura, and Gujarat.
encyclopedia.us-bazaar.com /?title=Mauryan_empire   (6291 words)

  
 Sticky Story of the Week!
The assassination of Brhadrata and the rise of the Sunga empire led to a wave of decline of Buddhists in India, but not in what is today Pakistan and Afghanistan.
The Sunga persecution also triggered the 180 BC invasion of northern India by the king Demetrius (the son of the Greco-Bactrian king Euthydemus) going as far as Pataliputra and established an Indo-Greek kingdom that lasted nearly two centuries, until around 10 BC.
Menander's territories covered the eastern dominions of the divided Greek empire of Bactria (from the areas of the Panjshir and Kapisa) and extended to the modern Pakistani province of Punjab with diffuse tributaries to the south and east, possibly even as far as Mathura.
www.rungg.com /streetTeams/pages.php?goto=story006   (1575 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The Kushan Empire was the crucible of trade among the Indians, Persians, Chinese, and Roman and controlled a critical part of the legendary Silk Road.
Contemporaries of the Gupta Empire and the successor state of the Satavahanas they formed the southern boundaries of the north and ruled over today's modern day states of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra during the 3rd and 5th centuries.
During the second half of the millennium after the fall of the Gupta Empire we see a gradual shift of the balance of power both military and cultural from the northern states to the rise of large southern kingdoms.
www.gamecheatz.net /games.php?title=Middle_kingdoms_of_India   (2920 words)

  
 Sunga Empire - Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Pusyamitra Sunga, a Brahmin, was believed by Buddhist scholars to be hostile towards Buddhists and allegedly persecuted the Buddhist faith.
He is recorded as having "destroyed monasteries and killed Monks" (Divyavadana, p429-434): 84.000 Buddhist stupas which had been built by the Mauryan king Ashoka were destroyed (R. Thaper), and 100 gold coins were offered for the head of each Buddhist monk (Indian Historical Quarterly Vol.
Pushyamitra is recorded to have performed the Ashvamedha Yagna and Sunga imperial insriptions have extended as far as Jalandhar in modern Indian Punjab.
www.lumrix.com /help/index.php/Sunga_Empire   (693 words)

  
 Chola dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
At its peak, the Chola Empire stretched from the island of Sri Lanka in the south to the Godavari basin in the north.
The Chola empire was completely overshadowed by the Pandyan empire, though many small chieftains continued to claim the title "Chola" well into the 15th century.
The Tang dynasty of China, the Srivijaya empire in the Malayan archipelago under the Sailendras, and the Abbasid Kalifat at Bagdad were the main trading partners.
www.a013.com /wiki/Chola   (5844 words)

  
 History of Buddhism
The objective of the council was to record the Buddha's sayings (sutra) and codify monastic rules (vinaya): Ananda, one of the Buddha's main disciples and his cousin, was called upon to recite the discourses of the Buddha, and Upali, another disciple, recited the rules of the vinaya.
An orthodox Brahmin, Sunga is known for his hostility and persecution towards the Buddhist faith.
The Kushans were supportive of Buddhism, and a fourth Buddhist council was convened by the Kushan emperor Kanishka, around 100 CE at Jalandhar or in Kashmir, and is usually associated with the formal rise of Mahayana Buddhism and its scission from Theravada Buddhism.
www.buddhaindex.com /browse.php?cat=273345   (3481 words)

  
 History Maurya Empire - History Of Ancient, Medieval And Modern India.
The Empire stretched to the north along the natural boundaries of the Himalayas and to the east, stretching into what is now Assam and Bangladesh.
The Empire was expanded into India's central and southern regions by Emperor Bindusara, but excluded a small portion of unexplored trial and forested regions near Kalinga.
The Mauryan empire is considered one of the greatest periods in Indian history.
www.bharatadesam.com /history/maurya_empire.php   (2768 words)

  
 Sunga Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Following the Mauryans Pusyamitra Sunga is frequently linked in tradition with the persecution of Buddhists and a resurgence of Hinduism that forced Buddhism outwards to Kashmir, Gandhara and Bactria.
Later Sunga kings were seen to be amenable to Buddhism and as having contributed to the building of the stupa at Bharhut.
Sunga art in North India (Bharhut and Bodgaya)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sunga_empire   (1281 words)

  
 Mauryan Empire - Jatland Wiki
Originating from the kingdom of Magadha in the Indo-Gangetic plains of modern Bihar and Bengal, and with its capital city of Pataliputra (near modern Patna), the Empire was founded in 321 BCE by Chandra Gupta Maurya, who had overthrown the Nanda Dynasty and begun expanding his power across central and western India.
The Empire was expanded into India's central and southern regions by Emperor Bindusara, but it excluded a small portion of unexplored tribal and forested regions near Kalinga.
He was killed in 185 BCE and power usurped by his commander-in-chief, the Brahmin general Pusyamitra Sunga, who then took over the throne and established the Sunga dynasty.
www.jatland.com /home/Mauryan_Empire   (1945 words)

  
 Sungas
The Sungas The founder of the Sunga dynasty was Pushyamitra Sunga.
He ascended the throne of Magadha in 185 B.C. The Sungas ruled for about 112 years Pushyamitra was a follower of Hinduism.
After the decline of the Mauryan Empire, the whole of North Western India fell into the hands of foreigners between the years 200 B.C. and 100 B.C. Except the Indo-Greeks or Bactrian Greeks, the Parthians, the Sakas and the Kushanas came from Central Asia.
www.indiaandindians.com /india_history/sungas.php   (166 words)

  
 Brhadrata
It is said that his territories, centered around the capital of Pataliputra, had shrunk considerably from the time of the great Emperor Ashoka, but that he was still upholding the Buddhist faith.
He was assassinated in 185 BCE during a military parade by the commander-in-chief of his guard, the Brahmin general Pusyamitra Sunga, who then took over the throne and established the Sunga dynasty.
It also triggered the 180 BCE invasion of northern India by the Greco-Bactrian king Demetrius, who went as far as Pataliputra and established an Indo-Greek kingdom that was to last close to two centuries until around 10 BCE, and under which Buddhism was able to flourish.
www.dcult.com /Buddhism-(A-K)/Brhadrata.php   (144 words)

  
 BHIND
The distributions of Asoka's inscriptions indicate that in the 3rd Century BC he was the master of a vast empire, embracing the whole of India excepting the four states of extreme south, Asokan inscription at Gujar (in the adjacent Datia district) testfies the close association of the Mourya emperor with this region.
The last of the Maurya sovereigns, Brihadradha was murdered by his minister Pashyamitra Sunga in 187 BC and the Sunga dynasty was estableshed in the Central portion of the Maurya empire.
Kanishka was the greatest of the Kushana emperors, His empire extended over Madhyadesha, Uttarapatha and Aparanta regions of ancient India strching from Bihar in the east to Khorasan in the west and from Khotan in the north to Konkan in the south.The District thus, was included in the Kushana empire.
www.bhind.nic.in /formation.html   (1217 words)

  
 The Gupta Empire and Hinduism, to 500 CE
The Gupta Empire and Hinduism, to 500 CE MacroHistory
Disintegration of the Mauryan Empire and the invasions were mitigated by a continuing trade in which Indians sold more to the Roman Empire than they bought, with Roman coins piling up in India.
While Rome was being overrun and the western half of the Roman Empire was disintegrating, Gupta rule was at the apex of its grandeur, prospering in agriculture, crafts and trade.
www.fsmitha.com /h1/ch28gup.htm   (1673 words)

  
 eBharat History History - -> Ancient India -> Mauryan Dynasty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The Mauryan Empire was (A republic in the Asian subcontinent in southern Asia; second most populous country in the world; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1947) India's first great unified empire.
Chandragupta's son  Bindusara extended the rule of the Mauryan empire towards central and southern India.
The reign of Asoka was followed for 50 years by a succession of weaker kings.  Brhadrata, the last ruler of the Mauryan dynasty, ruled territories that had shrunk considerably from the time of emperor Ashoka, but he was still upholding the (One who follows the teachings of Buddha) Buddhist faith.
history.ebharat.in /ancient_india/mauryan_dynasty.html   (633 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Ancient history - Calendar Encyclopedia
Although the ending date is largely arbitrary, most Western scholars use the fall of the Western Roman Empire in AD 476 as the traditional end of ancient European history.
Another term that is often used to refer to ancient history is antiquity, although this term is most often used to refer specifically to the civilizations of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome.
The Roman Empire was one of the ancient West's most literate cultures, but many works by its most widely read historians are lost.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Ancient_history.htm   (1722 words)

  
 Buddhism / history of buddhism
During the 1st century CE, the trade on the overland Silk Road tended to be restricted by the rise in the Middle-East of the Parthian empire, an unvanquished enemy of Rome, just as Romans were becoming extremely wealthy and their demand for Asian luxury was rising.
The Sri Vijaya Empire to the south and the Khmer Empire to the north competed for influence, and their art expressed the rich Mahayana pantheon of the Bodhisattvas.
Continental routes through the Indian subcontinent being compromised, direct sea routes between the Middle-East through Sri Lanka and to China developed, leading to the adoption of the Theravada Buddhism of the Pali canon, introduced to the region around the 11th century CE from Sri Lanka.
www.buddhism-guide.com /buddhism/history_of_buddhism.htm   (5053 words)

  
 History of India
The Sungas came from the region of Ujjain in western India, where they were officials under the Mauryas.
The Sungas were constantly occupied with wars : they campaigned against their southern neighbours in the northern Deccan, against the Greek inroad in the north-west and against the king of Kalinga to the south-east.
The Sunga empire originally comprised almost the entire Ganges valley and parts of northern India, although some of the regions were not under their direct control and merely owed them political allegiance.
www.indiansaga.com /history/post_mauryan.html   (276 words)

  
 Rise and Fall of the Mauryan Empire
Chandragupta divided his empire into districts, which were administered by his closest relatives and most trusted generals.
Whatever the cause or causes, regions within the empire asserted their independence, and the empire disintegrated while the Mauryan family, inPataliputra, continued to rule.
Kanishka's empire prospered economically, and it is said that to his court, from all over Asia, the wealth and wisdom of Kanishka attracted merchants, artists, poets and musicians.
www.fsmitha.com /h1/ch13.htm   (5235 words)

  
 History of India - Crystalinks
The empire came to an end with the attack of the Huns from central Asia.
The Sassanian empire of Persia, who were close contemporaries of the Guptas, began to expand into the northwestern part of ancient India (now Pakistan), where they established their rule.
The Cholas emerged as the most powerful empire in the south in the 9th century and retained their pre-eminent position until the 13th century when the Vijayanagar empire was founded.
www.crystalinks.com /indiahistory.html   (3885 words)

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