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Topic: Superessive case


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  Accusative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The accusative case of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a verb.
"Whom" is the accusative case of "who"; "him" is the accusative case of "he" (the final "m" of both of these words can be traced back to the Proto-Indo-European accusative case suffix); and "her" is the accusative case of "she".
This is the form in nominative case, used for the subject of a sentence.
www.nethider.com /cgi-bin/nph-proxy.cgi/010110A/http/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accusative_case   (560 words)

  
 Vocative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person (animal, object, etc.) being addressed and/or occasionally the determiners of that noun.
In Latin, e.g., the nominative case is lupus and the vocative case is lupe!
The vocative case in Romanian is inherited from Latin.
www.nethider.com /cgi-bin/nph-proxy.cgi/010110A/http/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocative   (1093 words)

  
 List of grammatical cases - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This is a list of cases as they are used by various inflectional languages that have declension.
Note: most cases used for location and motion can be used for time as well.
Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovak (note: this case is called lokál in Czech and in Slovak, and miejscownik in Polish)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_grammatical_cases   (317 words)

  
 Genitive case - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun.
In some languages, nouns in the genitive case also agree in case with the nouns they modify (that is, the head noun is marked for two cases).
Linguists generally believe that English possessive is no longer a case at all, but has become a clitic, an independent particle which, however, is always written and pronounced as part of the preceding word.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia?title=Genitive&redirect=no   (567 words)

  
 PS Wiki Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The excessive case is a grammatical case that denotes a transition away from a state.
It is a rare case found in certain dialects of Baltic-Finnic languages.
It completes the series of "to/in/from a state" series consisting of the translative case, the essive case and the excessive case.
70.84.119.226 /~puresear/PSWiki/index.php?title=Excessive_case   (120 words)

  
 Articles - Nominative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun.
The nominative case is the usual, natural form (more technically, the least marked) of certain parts of speech, such as nouns, adjectives, pronouns and less frequently numerals and participles, and sometimes does not indicate any special relationship with other parts of speech.
In nominative-absolutive languages, the nominative case marks the subject of a transitive verb or a voluntary subject of an intransitive verb, but not an involuntary subject of an intransitive verb (for which the absolutive case is used).
beatlesa.com /articles/Nominative   (285 words)

  
 Definition of Ablative case - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
In linguistics, the ablative case is a noun case found in several languages, including Armenian, Latin, Sanskrit and in the Finno-Ugric languages.
In Finnish, the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the meaning "from off of", e.g.
It is an outer locative case, used just as the adessive and allative cases to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Ablative_case   (255 words)

  
 Definition of Declension - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The patient of a (transitive) verb is in the accusative case.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
The Status of Morphological Case in the Icelandic Lexicon (http://www.hi.is/~eirikur/cases.pdf) by Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson.
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Declension   (573 words)

  
 Dative case - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns.
While the dative case is no longer a part of modern English usage, it survives in a few set expressions.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
open-encyclopedia.com /Dative   (334 words)

  
 Genitive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
It is a common misconception that English nouns have a genitive case, marked by the possessive -'s ending (known as the saxon genitive).
In the case of constellations, it is useful to know the genitive of the constellation's Latin name, since this is used to make the Bayer designation of stars in that constellation.
In Baltic-Finnic languages, the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.
www.tocatch.info /en/Genitive.htm   (667 words)

  
 LOCATIVE CASE WEALTHY AND WISE FACT FINDER   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and separative case.
In the Finnish grammar, the locative is included in the essive case.
In the Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form ''(-t/-tt)'' used only in a few city/town names along with the Inessive_case or Superessive_case.
www.boostmoney.com /Locative_case   (268 words)

  
 hungarian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Usually, vowels are inserted between the word and its suffix to prevent a buildup of consonants (and hence to prevent unpronouncable words).
There are further cases of restricted use (Locative case, Essive-modal case, Distributive case, Distributive-temporal case, Sociative case).
For examples of some of these cases, refer to the article on the Finnish language.
yourencyclopedia.net /hungarian_language.html   (1111 words)

  
 Absolutive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
In ergative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case is used to mark the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb.
In such languages, the ergative case is typically marked (most salient), while the absolutive case is unmarked.
In nominative-absolutive languages, the absolutive case marks the object of a transitive verb or an involuntary subject of an intransitive verb.
www.firebird.cn /wiki/Absolutive_case   (69 words)

  
 Dative case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given.
In Georgian, the dative case also marks the subject of the sentence in some verbs and some tenses.
The Old English language, current until approximately the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066, had a dative case; however, the English case system gradually fell into disuse during the Middle English period, when the accusative and dative pronouns merged into a single objective pronoun used in both roles.
en.letsrock.ch /wiki/Dative   (695 words)

  
 Locative case biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The locative case corresponds vaguely to the preposition "in", "at", or "by" of English and indicates a final location of action or a time of the action.
In languages such as Finnish, there is a set of six distinct locative cases that express different relationships to location.
In Hungarian language, nine such cases exist, yet the name locative case refers to a form used only in a few town names instead of or along with the Inessive case or Superessive case.
www.biography.ms /Locative_case.html   (159 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Superessive case is a grammatical declension indicating location on top of something.
Superessive case Oblique case Terminative case Declension in English Objective (grammar) List of grammatical cases Case table Causal-final case Delative case Sublative case Distributive case Arts Business Health...
Superessive case) háznál (Adessive case) to házba (Illative case) házra (Sublative case) házhoz (Allative case) Hungarian uses the plural sparsely, i.e.
superessive_case.iqexpand.com   (329 words)

  
 Read about Dative case at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Dative case and learn about Dative case here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Scottish Gaelic, the dative case is used by nouns following simple prepositions and the definite article.
Old English had a dative case; however, the case system gradually fell into disuse during the Middle English period, when the accusative and dative pronouns merged into a single
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Dative   (332 words)

  
 Hungarian language biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
This is in fact a matter of definition of "case", and the case system is widely used in contemporary grammatical description of all agglutinating languages, including Hungarian.
Most common of the cases in Hungarian are the nominative case, accusative case and dative case; some express location and placement (see the chart below); and some express other relations (terminative case, essive-formal case, instrumental-comitative case, translative case, causal-final case).
The definite conjugation is mostly used in case of a direct and definite object.
www.biography.ms /Hungarian_language.html   (2064 words)

  
 NTU Info Centre: Hungarian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The concept of grammatical cases was first used in Latin grammar.
This couldn't be done without reinterpreting to a certain extent the notion of what a case is for agglutinating languages, such as those in the Finno-Ugric language group.
Nowadays the term "case" is less widely used among Hungarian linguists to describe Hungarian grammar compared to centuries ago.
www.nowtryus.com /article:Hungarian_language   (2413 words)

  
 Telugu language - Unipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
In Telugu, Karta(కర్త) (nominative case or the doer), Karma(కర్మ)(object of the verb) and Kriya(క్రియ) (action or the verb) follow a sequence.
This is one of the several reasons why Linguists classify Telugu as a Dravidian Language--this pattern found in other Dravidian languages but not in Sanskrit.
The cases below are found in few Indo-European languages but are common in Finno-Ugric languages.
www.unipedia.info /Telugu.html   (1251 words)

  
 Declension user submissions and information...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Languages are categorized into several case systems, based on how they group verb agents and patients into cases:
Active-stative (also called active): The agent of a verb is always in the subject case, and the patient is always in the object case.
The lemma forms of words, which is the form chosen by convention as the canonical form of a word, is usually the most unmarked or basic case, which is typically the nominative, trigger, or absolutive case, whichever a language may have.
www.northtexasjazz.com /Declension.htm   (885 words)

  
 What is superessive case?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Superessive case is a case that expresses location on the referent of the noun it marks.
The term superessive case is used especially in studies of Finno-Ugric grammar.
This page is an extract from the LinguaLinks Library, Version 5.0 published on CD-ROM by SIL International, 2003.
www.sil.org /linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsSuperessiveCase.htm   (74 words)

  
 Superessive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Superessive case is a grammatical declension indicating location on top of something or on the surface of something.
Its name comes from Latin supersum, superesse: to be over and above.
While most languages communicate this concept through the use of prepositions, there are some (most notably the family of Finno-Ugric languages which includes Finnish and Hungarian) which make use of cases for this grammatical structure.
www.firebird.cn /wiki/Superessive_case   (78 words)

  
 Dative   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The dative generally marks the indirect object of a verb, although in some instances, the dative is used for the direct object of a verb pertaining directly to an act of giving something.
Dative also marks possession in Vulgar Latin (and, to a lesser extent, Classical Latin) and in Classical Greek, which has lost the locative and instrumental cases.
Modern German usually additionally uses prepositions to mark the dative, most commonly aus, außer, bei, mit, nach, seit, von, and zu (a sequence that may be remembered by singing them to the main tune of the Blue Danube as a mnemonic device).
www.apawn.com /search.php?title=Dative   (654 words)

  
 What is case?
Case is a grammatical category determined by the syntactic or semantic function of a noun or pronoun.
The term case has traditionally been restricted to apply to only those languages which indicate certain functions by the inflection of
In the following sentence, case is indicated by the case markers ga, ni, and o:
www.sil.org /linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsCase.htm   (140 words)

  
 Superessive case -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Superessive case -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
The Superessive case is a grammatical (The inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages) declension indicating location on top of something.
(Its name comes from (Any dialect of the language of ancient Rome) Latin supersum, superesse: to be over and above.)
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/su/superessive_case.htm   (66 words)

  
 toolhost.com >> Nominative case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
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toolhost.com /Nominative_case.html   (378 words)

  
 Hungarian Formative Suffixes
The so-called Superessive Case creates Adverbs of Place
The so-called Distributive Case creates Adverbs of Manner
This suffix expresses a change from one state to another.
member.melbpc.org.au /~tmajlath/form-suffix.html   (531 words)

  
 nominative
Giving a name; naming; designating; -- said of that case or
a verb [syn: nominative case, subject case] [ant:
Type your search term into the input field and press the 'Search' button!
dictionary-x.com /nominative.html   (168 words)

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