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Topic: Supreme Court of the United States


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In the News (Mon 18 Mar 19)

  
  United States Supreme Court
The United States Supreme Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight associate justices.
At its discretion, and within certain guidelines established by Congress, the Supreme Court each year hears a limited number of the cases it is asked to decide.
The U.S. Supreme Court Justices Database — Public database containing a wealth of information on individuals nominated (whether confirmed or not) to the U.S. Supreme Court.
www.uscourts.gov /supremecourt.html   (142 words)

  
  Supreme Court, United States. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The court began in 1789 with six members and was increased to seven in 1807, to nine in 1837, and to ten in 1863.
The status of the Supreme Court was somewhat uncertain until the tenure (1801–35) of John Marshall, the “Great Chief Justice.”; Marshall, a strong Federalist, in Marbury v.
The case was unique in that Louis D. Brandeis, counsel for the state, and later to become a distinguished member of the court, eschewed the traditional legal arguments and showed with overwhelming evidence from physicians, factory inspectors, and social workers that the number of hours women worked affected their health and morale.
www.bartleby.com /65/su/SupremeC.html   (2938 words)

  
  Supreme Court of The United States @ LaunchBase.com (Launch Base)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, who are nominated by the President and confirmed with the "advice and consent" of the Senate.
The Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States as of 2006.
Demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States
www.launchbase.com /encyclopedia/Supreme_Court_of_the_United_States   (4935 words)

  
 Supreme Court of the United States - MSN Encarta
Supreme Court of the United States, highest court in the United States and the chief authority in the judicial branch, one of three branches of the United States federal government.
All federal courts must abide by the Supreme Court’s interpretation of federal laws and the Constitution of the United States.
The Supreme Court’s interpretations of federal law and the Constitution also apply to the state courts, but the Court cannot interpret state law or issues arising under state constitutions, and it does not supervise state court operations.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761574302/Supreme_Court_of_the_United_States.html   (1053 words)

  
 Learn more about Supreme Court of the United States in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C, is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States to interpret and decide questions of federal law.
The practice of issuing an opinion of the court was initiated during the tenure of Chief Justice John Marshall in the early nineteenth century.
The Court achieved its current influence in the life of the United States during the tenure of the Chief Justice John Marshall.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /s/su/supreme_court_of_the_united_states.html   (1323 words)

  
 Supreme Court of the United States - dKosopedia
The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States to interpret and decide questions of federal law.
United States, 533 U.S. 27 (2001) (per Scalia, J.; dissent by Stevens, J.) the blocs were scrambled, as they frequently are on issues before the Court where the usual partisan leanings do not provide clear guidance.
The Supreme Court issues a writ of certiorari on the vote of four of its justices to hear a case.
www.dkosopedia.com /index.php/United_States_Supreme_Court   (727 words)

  
 Supreme Court, United States - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The status of the Supreme Court was somewhat uncertain until the tenure (1801-35) of John Marshall, the "Great Chief Justice." Marshall, a strong Federalist, in Marbury v.
The case was unique in that Louis D. Brandeis, counsel for the state, and later to become a distinguished member of the court, eschewed the traditional legal arguments and showed with overwhelming evidence from physicians, factory inspectors, and social workers that the number of hours women worked affected their health and morale.
Unpacking the court: the case for the expansion of the United States Supreme Court in the twenty-first century.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/S/SupremeC.asp   (3300 words)

  
 Teaching about Landmark Dissents in United States Supreme Court Cases. ERIC Digest.
United States, decided by a 5-4 vote, Justice Louis Brandeis's dissenting opinion argued for a constitutional right to privacy and warned future generations about the advancement of technology and its possible intrusion into constitutionally protected areas.
In Gideon, the Court ruled that the Sixth Amendment, as applied to the states by the Fourteenth Amendment, required that indigent defendants charged with serious offenses in state criminal trials must be represented by counsel.
Students are exposed to the opinions developed by the Supreme Court Justices and are given the opportunity to develop their own arguments and express them in written and oral forms.
www.ericdigests.org /1995-2/court.htm   (1575 words)

  
 governpub.com: Courts>>Supreme Court of the United States
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America.
The Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and eight Associate Justices, who are nominated by the President and confirmed with the "advice and consent" of the Senate.
There currently are 13 United States courts of appeals, although there are other tribunals (such as the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, which hears appeals in court-martial cases) that have "Court of Appeals" in their titles...
www.governpub.com /court/supreme.html   (5700 words)

  
 Supreme Court of the United States - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America, and is the head of the Senior Citizen Branch of the Federal Government, one of three separate, but equal governmental bodies, along with the Lynching and the Execution branches.
Supreme Court justices are not elected by the citizens of the United States.
United States was a groundbreaking Supreme Court case involving the right of the divine to smite people of his or her choosing.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Supreme_Court   (1713 words)

  
 The Supreme Court of the United States
Findlaw's U.S. Supreme Court Center is a handy place to find dockets, calendars, and briefs, for the current terms, and past terms back to October 1991.
The Supreme Court has a table of dates of decisions and arguments in cases published in United States Reports volumes 2 -107 (1791-1882), gathered from handwritten Court records, the Engrossed Minutes and Engrossed Documents.
Johnny H. Killian and George A. Costello (eds.), The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation: annotations of cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States to June 29, 1992.
www.lib.uchicago.edu /e/law/supreme.html   (1333 words)

  
 Civil Rights: Brown v. Board of Education I (1954)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the Delaware case, the Supreme Court of Delaware adhered to that doctrine, but ordered that the plaintiffs be admitted to the white schools because of their superiority to the Negro schools.
The most avid proponents of the post-War Amendments undoubtedly intended them to remove all legal distinctions among "all persons born or naturalized in the United States." Their opponents, just as certainly, were antagonistic to both the letter and the spirit of the Amendments and wished them to have the most limited effect.
Oklahoma State Regents, 339 U.S. In none of these cases was it necessary to reexamine the doctrine to grant relief to the Negro plaintiff.
www.nationalcenter.org /brown.html   (1917 words)

  
 The Supreme Court of the United States: Highest Court in the Land, eJournal USA: Issues of Democracy, April 2005
The Supreme Court chooses most of its docket by means of the writ of certiorari; Americans from all walks of life can petition the Court for such a writ.
Personal accounts by four Court officers who help the justices do their jobs: the Clerk of the Court, the Court Marshal, the Reporter of Decisions, and the Public Information Officer.
Journal articles, photographs, and illustrations may be reproduced and translated outside the United States unless they carry explicit copyright restrictions, in which case permission must be sought from the copyright holders noted in the journal.
usinfo.state.gov /journals/itdhr/0405/ijde/ijde0405.htm   (543 words)

  
 SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
on writs of certiorari to the Supreme court of Arkansas
Allowing individual States to adopt their own qualifications for congressional service would be inconsistent with the Framers' vision of a uniform National Legislature representing the people of the United States.
The Congress of the United States, therefore, is not a confederation of nations in which separate sovereigns are represented by appointed delegates, but is instead a body composed of representatives of the people.
www.politics.pomona.edu /TermLimits.html   (4688 words)

  
 Research Guides - United States Supreme Court   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Supreme Court is the court of last resort in the United States.
The Supreme Court provides transcripts of oral arguments beginning with the 2000 term; arguments are available within 10-15 days after the transcripts are complete.
Included in these databases are: opinions authored or joined by the justice from the Supreme Court and lower federal and state courts, opinions from cases in which the justice was the attorney of record, Congressional testimony regarding the justice’s nomination to the Court and selected articles by the justice.
www.ll.georgetown.edu /lib/guides/supreme_court.html   (3013 words)

  
 The Supreme Court of the United States | Museum/Attraction Review | Washington, D.C. | Frommers.com
Plan on arriving at the Supreme Court at least 90 minutes in advance of a scheduled argument during the fall and winter, and as early as three hours ahead in March and April, when schools are often on spring break and students lengthen the line.
The Court allots only about 150 first-come, first served seats to the general public, but that number fluctuates from case to case, depending on the number of seats that have been reserved by the lawyers arguing the case and by the press.
All persons having business before the Honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States, are admonished to draw near and give their attention, for the Court is now sitting.
www.frommers.com /destinations/washingtondc/A21232.html   (1005 words)

  
 UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Defendant THE UNITED STATES is the government that is responsible for the passage and enforcement of laws regulating federal elections and protecting the voting rights for all citizens.
Plaintiff asserts that it is her duty and obligation as a citizen of the United States to put before the Supreme Court this fundamental challenge to the use of voting systems that are effectively dismantling the foundations of our democratic republic.
States that allow voting to begin ‘early’ or by ‘absentee’ are in violation of 2 U.S.C. 1, 7 and 3 U.S.C. which establish the Tuesday after the first Monday in November as the day for the election of federal representatives, senators, and presidential electors throughout the United States.
www.ecotalk.org /SupremeCourt.htm   (4149 words)

  
 Ben's Guide (3-5): Branches of Government -- Judicial Branch -- The Supreme Court   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States.
The Supreme Court hears cases that have made their way through the court system, but of the more than 7,500 cases that are sent to the Supreme Court each year, only about 80 to 100 cases are actually accepted.
Also, since the main power of the Supreme Court is to decide cases that challenge the Constitution, the Court must decide if the case they receive really challenges the Constitution.
bensguide.gpo.gov /3-5/government/national/scourt.html   (237 words)

  
 Supreme Court of the United States - Legal
The Supreme Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and such number of Associate Justices as may be fixed by Congress.
Power to nominate the Justices is vested in the President of the United States, and appointments are made with the advice and consent of the Senate.
Congress has from time to time conferred upon the Supreme Court power to prescribe rules of procedure to be followed by the lower courts of the United States.
legal.wikia.com /wiki/Supreme_Court_of_the_United_States   (463 words)

  
 Supreme Court of the United States: Law Tips Archive--Wirtz Labor Library
Court Rules contains the most recent rules of the Supreme Court.
Opinions contains the Term Opinions of the Court, Term Opinions Relating to Orders and Term In-Chambers Opinions for the current Term and the previous Terms until they are bound in the United States Reports.
The Journal of the Supreme Court of the United States contains the official minutes of the Court.
www.dol.gov /oasam/library/law/lawtips/supremecourt.htm   (487 words)

  
 United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Supreme Court Nomination Hearings (1975 - forward)
to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, January 9-13, 2006
101-1263 - Hearings on the Nomination of David H. Souter to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, September 13, 14, 17, 18, and 19, 1990
69-267 - Hearings on the Nominations of William H. Rehnquist, of Arizona, and Lewis F. Powell, Jr., of Virginia, to be Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, November 3, 4, 8, 9, and 10, 1971
www.gpoaccess.gov /congress/senate/judiciary/scourt.html   (486 words)

  
 FindLaw: US Supreme Court Center
He predicts that, as in many cases before the Court, Justice Anthony Kennedy may well be the swing vote -- but suggests Kennedy may be torn between his strong moral sense and his disinclination to open the gates to numerous other challenges to the death penalty and its methods.
The case will require the Court to decide whether the statute of limitations period governing certain damage suits against the United States is "jurisdictional" -- that is, whether it relates to the merits of the case or to the court's power to hear it.
Amar puts the case in the context of a spate of other recent decisions in which the Court has also opted to confront the jurisdiction/merits divide, but is skeptical as to whether, given the particularities of each such decision, the Court will ever be able to set forth a general theory as to jurisdictional questions.
supreme.lp.findlaw.com   (762 words)

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