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Topic: Susan Haack


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In the News (Mon 12 Nov 18)

  
  Department of Philosophy ::: Dr. Susan Haack
Susan Haack (B.A., M.A., B.Phil., Oxford; Ph.D., Cambridge), formerly Fellow of New Hall, Cambridge, and then professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick, is presently Cooper Senior Scholar in Arts and Sciences, Professor of Philosophy, and Professor of Law at UM.
Haack serves on the Board of the Shannon Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Virginia, on the Advisory Board of the Peirce Edition Project, and on the editorial boards of numerous journals in the U.S., the U.K., Spain, and Brazil.
Haack's Philosophy of Logics was published in Brazil in fall 2002, and the Chinese edition in Beijing in summer 2003.
www.as.miami.edu /phi/haack   (262 words)

  
  Susan Haack
Susan Haack (born 1945) is a professor of philosophy and law, and is currently on the faculty at the University of Miami in Florida.
Haack held the positions of Fellow of New Hall, Cambridge and professor of philosophy at the University of Warwick, before taking her position at Miami.
Haack is an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi, a past President of the Charles S. Peirce Society, and a past member of the U.S./U.K. Educational Commission.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/s/su/susan_haack.html   (359 words)

  
  Susan Haack
Susan Haack is a professor of philosophy and law, and is currently on the faculty at the University of Miami in Florida.
A graduate of Oxford and Cambridge, Haack held the positions of Fellow of New Hall, Cambridge and professor of philosophy at the University of Warwick, before taking her position at Miami.
Haack is an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi, a past President of the Charles S. Peirce Society, and a past member of the U.S./U.K. Educational Commission.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/s/su/susan_haack.html   (384 words)

  
 Susan Haack -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Haack held the positions of Fellow of (additional info and facts about New Hall, Cambridge) New Hall, Cambridge and professor of philosophy at the (additional info and facts about University of Warwick) University of Warwick, before taking her position at Miami.
Haack's work is well known, having been reviewed and cited in such general interest publications as the (additional info and facts about Times Literary Supplement) Times Literary Supplement, as well as many more specialized (An educator who works at a college or university) academic journals.
Haack is an honorary member of (additional info and facts about Phi Beta Kappa) Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi, a past President of the (additional info and facts about Charles S. Peirce) Charles S. Peirce Society, and a past member of the U.S./U.K. Educational Commission.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/su/susan_haack.htm   (424 words)

  
 20th WCP: Haack On Fuzzy Logic
Haack concludes that it is pretty clear that it does not: resort to fuzzy logic by no means avoids all the complications of regimentation, for it introduces enormous complexity of its own, and it still requires the imposition of artificial precision.
Haack emphasizes that one needs to distinguish between two kinds of vagueness, unidimensional versus multidimensional vagueness which reflects the distinction between predicates like "old" or "tall" on the one hand, and "beautiful" or "capable" on the other.
Haack however points out that this argument cannot be used in the present case, for the complexities introduced by fuzzy logic are such as to nullify the usual definite, mechanical, routine character of formal rules (e.g.
www.bu.edu /wcp/Papers/Logi/LogiGrun.htm   (2422 words)

  
 Evidence and Inquiry, by Susan Haack
Although Haack's critique of foundationalism is cogent and effective, she does commit one serious logical error.
Haack's "Foundherentism Articulated" seems to be the substantial foundation of a theory, and her analogy of the crossword puzzle is suggestive and illustrative.
Haack's work, however, is far more strongly grounded in the tradition of epistemological theory and involves far more illuminating criticism of various theories than does Bernstein's.
www.friesian.com /haack.htm   (1966 words)

  
 bensozia
Susan Haack is a philosopher who cares about the search for truth, and in Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate she defends the genuine quest for knowledge and understanding against the assault on rational thought emanating from America's universities.
Haack's main method in these essays is the same as that of Aristotle and innumerable thinkers since: she makes careful distinctions between ideas that others have blurred and seeks definitions for words that others have used as if they had no particular meaning at all.
Haack knows better, and when she takes up relativism she produces a two-column table with the format "A is relative to B" laying out a range of possibilities.
www.bensozia.com /benideas/haack.html   (1171 words)

  
 2004 Journal Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Susan Haack's Defending Science-Within Reason: Between Scientism and Cynicism is an insightful, stimulating, and interesting book that should appeal to scholars interested in the epistemology of science, science policy, and science wars.
Haack first lays out a brief history of landmark cases and rulings affecting the admissibility and use of scientific evidence in court, and provides helpful commentary on the epistemological assumptions (and sometimes errors) in the legal documents.
Haack concludes that science can be threatening in the view of individuals or societies, both in cases where it succeeds, as well as where it fails.
www.scipolicy.net /scipolicy_journal/2004.htm   (2715 words)

  
 TCS: Tech Central Station - Defending an Old-Fashioned Prig   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Haack's guiding metaphor for science is a crossword puzzle: Theories and lines of evidence become more convincing as they interlock; ideas are provisionally "penciled in," but some become so well-supported as to be virtually certain.
Haack proposes instead a "sensible program" in sociology of science; this would examine the social aspects of science without assuming the irrelevance of physical reality.
Haack similarly delves into the academic study of "rhetoric of science," in which science is likened to literature, communication skills are deemed key to which scientific theories are accepted, and chemistry is perceived as having no more connection to external reality than does
www.techcentralstation.com /101303B.html   (762 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Susan Haack   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Susan Haack (born 1945) is a professor of philosophy and law, and is currently on the faculty at the University of Miami in Florida.
Born in England, she is a graduate of Oxford and Cambridge.
Haack held the positions of Fellow of New Hall, Cambridge and professor of philosophy at the University of Warwick, before taking her position at Miami.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Susan-Haack   (382 words)

  
 University of Miami School of Law: Susan Haack
Haack serves on the Editorial Board of Philosophy, Science, and Law, and the Advisory Board of Ratio Juris, and edited an issue of the American Philo­soph­ical Association's Newsletter on Philosophy and Law on Science in the Law, which appeared in the fall of 2003.
Haack was awarded the Principal's Prize at St. Hilda's College in 1965, and held a Harkness Fellowship at Princeton in 1975-6.
In 2004 Haack was included in Peter J. King, 100 Philosophers: The Life and Work of the World's Greatest Thinkers (New York: Barron), which includes philosophers, from the East as well as the West, from Thales and Confucius to the present day; she is one of the handful of living philosophers so honored.
www.law.miami.edu /facadmin/faculty/shaack.html   (1044 words)

  
 Barnes & Noble.com - Defending Science - Within Reason - Susan Haack - Hardcover
Haack reviews the fascinating history of this tentative dance between law and science, and how in recent years the legal system has struggled to determine what scientific ideas can be considered as accepted beyond dispute.
In a series of essays that combine clarity with humor, careful argument with accessible examples, and philosophical acumen with broad literary and scientific knowledge, Susan Haack disentangles a vast 'bramble-bush' (to borrow the term she borrows from Carl Llewellyn) of issues surrounding the role of science in society and the role of society in science.
In Haack’s analysis of these theories, she shows that while there are similarities, there are also important points of difference between scientific texts and literary ones, and that consequently it is unhelpful to regard a scientific work as a literary text.
search.barnesandnoble.com /booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?isbn=1591021170   (2096 words)

  
 Michael Tooley's Philosophy Home Page
Note: Haack uses the term "evidence" in an unusual way, since, first, propositions can be part of one's experiential C-evidence even if one does not believe them, and, secondly, one's experiential S-evidence consists of mental states that need not be beliefs.
Haack says that the incorporation of these true propositions into the experiential C-evidence is "the foundherentist way of acknowledging that the ultimate evidence for empirical beliefs is experience ­ very different from the forced and unnatural way in which foundationalism tries to acknowledge it, by requiring basic beliefs justified by experience alone." (422)
According to Haack's foundherentism, the C-evidence for a belief could all be indirect ­ that is, it could be C-evidence for other beliefs that are appropriately related to the belief in question.
spot.colorado.edu /~tooley/Foundherentism.html   (1983 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Defending Science-Within Reason: Between Scientism and Cynicism: Books: Susan Haack   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Haack reviews the fascinating history of this tentative dance between law and science, and how in recent years the legal system has struggled to determine what scientific ideas can be considered as accepted beyond dispute.
Susan Haack's "Defending Science-Within Reason" is the only philosophy of science I have read that has any resemblance to science as I know and practice it.
Haack also shows the relevance of her own work by delving into how the ways we think about science influence practical matters, like decisions by judges about what scientific testimony should be allowed in the courtroom.
www.amazon.com /Defending-Science-Within-Reason-Scientism-Cynicism/dp/1591021170   (1967 words)

  
 EPISTEMIC COHERENCE
Haack's (1993) explication of coherence relies largely on an analogy between epistemic justification and crossword puzzles.
Haack's explication of "pervasive relations of mutual support" relies largely on an analogy with how crossword puzzles are solved by fitting together clues and possible interlocking solutions.
Using analogies, as Haack does when she compares epistemic justification to crossword puzzles, requires the ability to map between two analogs, the target problem to be solved and the source that is intended to provide a solution.
cogsci.uwaterloo.ca /Articles/Pages/epistemic.html   (9248 words)

  
 Duhem on Underdetermination
Haack: different people assess evidence differently because of differences in background beliefs, not due to differences in their view of what constitutes evidence.
Haack's response: in cases when there is genuine underdetermination, we should just admit we don't know which is correct, rather than letting social values determine this.
Haack: some "objects" are socially constructed -- money, marriage, prestige, etc. Even these are not constructed by the activity of theorizing about them, though.
www.trinity.edu /cbrown/science/haack-Latour.html   (600 words)

  
 Peirception: Critical Common-Sensism in the Theory of Perception   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
According to Haack, the dichotomy between typical realism and inferentialism is overcome by Peirce's distinction between the perceptual judgment, the belief that accompanies a perceptual experience, and the percept, the phenomenal, interactive aspect of a perceptual experience.
Although I agree with Haack and Peirce that perception is both direct and representational, I have doubts about whether perception is direct and representational in the way CCS says it is. The theory attempts to locate the representational character of perception exclusively in the perceptual judgment.
As Haack notes, Peirce characterized perceptual judgments as "the extremest case of Abductive Judgments." (5.185, 1903) A perceptual judgment is like the conclusion of an abductive inference, in that it is potentially explanatory of the relevant percept.
www.american-philosophy.org /archives/2002_Conference/2002_papers/tp-14.htm   (5800 words)

  
 A new philosophy of science - The Washington Times: Non-Fiction Review   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Scientists have found a faithful friend in philosopher Susan Haack — an ardent defender of the scientific establishment who is forthright in acknowledging its flaws.
Miss Haack explores the confusing role of scientific evidence in the courtroom, with its countervailing claims presented to often clueless jurors.
Her chapter on the conflict between science and Christianity is disappointing, not because of her conclusion that creationism should not be taught in biology classrooms, but because she seems to make the mistake of insisting on a logical construct for something which, by definition, requires a leap of faith.
www.washtimes.com /books/20031129-105902-1592r.htm   (1089 words)

  
 The Humanities and The Sciences (ACLS Occasional Paper No. 47): DISCUSSION
Susan McClary (University of California, Los Angeles): I'm a musicologist, and one of the things that I was thinking of when I listened to Peter Galison's wonderful talk is that musicology has wanted to go back and freeze itself in that moment of objectivity.
Susan Haack: It seems to me there are two questions: one is about what ends we should be pursuing, which is properly a question of the people who are affected.
Susan Haack: And it seems to me that what I do really isn't quite like that, because all that I require is time and peace of mind.
www.acls.org /op47-5.htm   (6227 words)

  
 Majikthise : Saluting Susan Haack
My distinguished, articulate, and wry colleague Susan Haack, who holds a joint appointment in Philosophy and Law has been honored with inclusion in a book profiling One Hundred Philosophers : The Life and Work of the World’s Greatest Thinkers.
A few years later, Haack's Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate helped me figure out how to be a feminist and a critical thinker.
Haack calls herself a moderate, but I consider her a radical in the best sense of the term.
majikthise.typepad.com /majikthise_/2004/09/saluting_susan_.html   (386 words)

  
 Metapsychology Online Reviews - Pragmatism, Old And New   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Susan Haack's selection of articles by a range of pragmatists, old and new, serves well to collect in one place some of those pragmatist insights.
Haack comes to her task as editor with a very clearly spelled out agenda -- she sees pragmatism as divided into two kinds: the classical, scientifically inclined form to be traced back to Peirce and what she calls 'vulgar pragmatism', of which Rorty is the epitome.
Still, Haack does not allow her preferences to justify excluding articles from the selection, and she includes two of Rorty's articles as well as articles by other philosophers friendly to Rorty's position, Schiller being just one.
www.mentalhelp.net /books/books.php?type=de&id=3386   (921 words)

  
 News ForUM | The University of Montana   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
As one of today's preeminent philosophers, Haack will discuss several themes from her new book, "Defending Science -- Within Reason," including what we mean by scientific evidence and the scientific method, the relation of science to literature, the tensions between science and religion, the role of scientific testimony in court and the future of science.
She is the author of several books, many of which are considered groundbreaking in her field, and has published numerous articles in professional philosophy journals and scientific publications, as well as in legal journals and general interest magazines.
Haack is an elected British delegate to the Institut International de Philosophie and serves as a member on the Advisory Board of the Shannon Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Virginia.
www.umt.edu /urelations/nf/100603/lecture.htm   (424 words)

  
 Duke Magazine-In Memoriam, J. Robinson “Rob” Lenoir -Nov/Dec 2001
He is survived by his wife, Susan Haack Lenoir ’84; his son Andrew, and daughter Courtney; his parents; a brother; and a sister.
Allan Haack talks about the importance Rob placed on his children’s education at the Greenvale School, and how he is being remembered by the school: This past weekend was the Greenvale School fall fair weekend.
The headmaster of the school announced that the funds raised by the run would be used in two ways—the donation of a memorial bench with Rob’s name on it, and to fund a program for character-building for the whole school, because they felt that Rob had such strong character.
www.dukemagazine.duke.edu /dukemag/issues/111201/memoriam_1.html   (920 words)

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