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Topic: Swiss German


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  Swiss German - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The reason why "Swiss German" dialects constitute a special group is their almost unrestricted use as a spoken language in practically all situations of daily life, whereas the use of the Alemannic dialects in the other countries is restricted or even endangered.
Swiss German is intelligible to speakers of other Alemannic dialects, but usually not readily intelligible to speakers of Standard German, including French- or Italian-speaking Swiss who learn Standard German at school.
Swiss German is a regional or political umbrella term, not a linguistic unity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Swiss_German   (1987 words)

  
 Switzerland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The massive mobilisation of Swiss armed forces under the leadership of General Henri Guisan is often cited as a decisive factor that the German invasion was never initiated.
However, Swiss law is gradually being adjusted to conform with that of the EU and the government has signed a number of bilateral agreements with the European Union.
On June 5, 2005, Swiss voters agreed, by a 55% majority, to join the Schengen treaty, a result that was welcomed by EU commentators as a sign of goodwill by Switzerland, a country that is traditionally perceived as isolationist.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Switzerland   (3734 words)

  
 Swiss German
The term Hochdeutsch (High German) is, in a Swiss context, often reserved for Standard German, which is imported from Germany and thus not a Swiss German dialect.
Swiss dialects are an essential part of the local cultural identity, which goes in some places down to the local village or cultural subgroup level (the upper class of Basle has their special dialect as well as the farmers of Adelboden).
Swiss German is intelligible to speakers of other Alemannic dialects, but usually not intelligible to speakers of Standard German (which includes French or Italian Swiss who learn Standard German at school).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/sw/Swiss_German.html   (600 words)

  
 Switzerland - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
However, Swiss law is gradually being adjusted to that of the EU and the government has signed a number of bilateral agreements with the European Union.
On June 5, 2005, Swiss voters agreed, by a 55% majority, to join the Schengen treaty, a result that was welcomed by EU commentators as a sign of goodwill by a Switzerland that is traditionally perceived as isolationist.
The German spoken in Switzerland is predominantly a group of dialects that are almost unintelligible to Germans and are collectively known as Swiss German, but written communication and broadcasts typically use standard German.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/s/w/i/Switzerland.html   (2919 words)

  
 Swiss culture - culture in Switzerland : Language distribution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
German is by far the most widely spoken language in Switzerland: 17 of the 26 cantons are monolingual in German.
German, French, Italian and Rhaeto-Rumantsch all have the status of national languages, but only the first three are official languages.
The Swiss can certainly be proud of their linguistic proficiency and many understand the other languages of their fellow countrymen very well.
www.swissworld.org /eng/swissworld.html?siteSect=601&sid=4059003&rubricId=14010   (792 words)

  
 Pimsleur Swiss-German - Compact Language Program
German is notorious for its multiple and distinctive regional dialects; at the colloquial level, German speakers from Bavaria speak quite a different flavor of German than the residents of Stuttgart.
As a result, virtually all educated German speakers learn High German (Hochdeutch), which as an official language can be used throughout the German-speaking world and is the standard for use by the media as well as in educational and government institutions.
Dialectical pronunciations of Swiss German can vary even between regions within Switzerland, but the spoken language of Zurich is recognized by a majority of speakers, and it is this dialect that is represented on the Pimsleur tapes.
www.pluralitylanguage.com /languages/pimsleur/german_swiss/german_swiss.htm   (415 words)

  
 BigRedGarage.com - Learn to Speak Swisss German with Pimsleur Swiss German Language Courses
Swiss German comprises dozens of regional dialects unique to Switzerland, and is unrecognizable to speakers of High German.
Swiss German is used at home, at work, in shops, etc. Local radio and TV programs are also in Swiss German.
Swiss German is a spoken language and not a written language.
www.bigredgarage.com /swissgerman.htm   (342 words)

  
 Transparent Language - German Language Learning
German is the official language of Germany, Austria, and Liechtenstein.
German is spoken in diverse modern dialects in Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, northern Italy, much of Switzerland, eastern France (Alsace and parts of Lorraine), as well as parts of Belgium and Luxembourg.
German belongs to the West Germanic sub-branch (along with English, Frisian, Yiddish, Dutch, and Afrikaans) of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages.
www.learn-german-language-software.com /overview.htm   (872 words)

  
 Aviso.net - German / Austrian / Swiss Community in America   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
German Village Society - OH - Committed to promoting and preserving the historic neighborhood consisting of various businesses as well as residential housing.
Pennsylvania German Society, The - PA - A nonprofit, educational organization devoted to the study of the Pennsylvania German people and their 300-year history in America.
Monroe Swiss Singers - WI - A Swiss choral group dedicated to the preservation of Swiss culture and traditions.
www.aviso.net /dir/usa/german/community/ger_comm2.htm   (326 words)

  
 Overview of the German Language to Help You Learn German
In Swiss German, for example, the word "Kind" (child) is pronounced "Chind." Furthermore, in most of the Swiss German dialects, the nouns do not differentiate case inflections the way they do in High German.
The German language belongs to the West Germanic sub-branch (along with English, Frisian, Yiddish, Dutch, and Afrikaans) of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages.
German was shaped by migration of the Germanic tribes who lived in northern Europe during the first millennium BC.
www.transparent.com /languagepages/german/overview.htm   (840 words)

  
 Handbook of Texas Online:
There were plans for settlement of Swiss in Texas as early as 1819, when a group of Swiss merchants in Philadelphia proposed to settle 10,000 of their countrymen in Texas.
The population peak of the Swiss in most Texas areas was reached in the years 1890 to 1910; during this period there were Swiss settlements in Bexar, Dallas, Austin, Fayette, Travis, and Williamson counties.
Vernon, in Wilbarger County, was settled by the Swiss in 1893.
www.tsha.utexas.edu /handbook/online/articles/view/SS/pns1.html   (854 words)

  
 A CULINARY TRIP AROUND SWITZERLAND
There is no "official" Swiss cuisine; the cooking mirrors the diversity of local history and customs, but also brims with wonderful innovations.
The Swiss are very fussy patrons, after all, and they love good food whether it is a a renowned restaurant such as FLETSCHHORN or down-home simple, based on unpretentious country fare.
The vast variety of legendary, sumptuous Swiss pastries is not only enjoyed as dessert, but also during leisurely afternoons with tea or coffee...at a sidewalk cafe or on a mountain-top.
www.travellady.com /articles/article-swiss-taste.html   (1295 words)

  
 Pimsleur Swiss-German Language Course - Switzerland for Visitors
Standard German is used in school, in newspapers and magazines, in international business, and for broadcasts such as national news and imported TV shows.
One reason why dialect and standard German coexist is that Swiss German is a spoken language, not a written language (although various ways of spelling Swiss-German words do exist, mainly for use in reference and teaching materials, advertising, and such).
If you were a German-speaking Swiss, you'd probably converse with friends and relatives in Swiss-German but send them e-mail or letters in the High German that you learned in school.
europeforvisitors.com /switzaustria/articles/pimsleur_swiss_german.htm   (394 words)

  
 German Swiss Collections
Swiss presses produced religious and humanistic works, political pamphlets, scientific books such as Conrad Gesner’s Historiae Animalium and chronicles of the confederation’s ‘history’ which helped to popularise the legend of Wilhelm Tell throughout Europe.
This is the kind of uniquely Swiss material which the Library attempts to collect as far as possible within the context of the general current collecting policy.
Similarly, we try to acquire Swiss works relating to specifically Swiss concerns such as the recent re-evaluation of the country’s relationship with Nazi Germany or the anniversaries of the Confederation in 1991 and of the Helvetic Republic and Federal Constitution in 1998.
www.bl.uk /collections/westeuropean/germanswiss.html   (1094 words)

  
 Ethnologue report for language code:gsw
Swiss varieties are High Alemannisch (most) and Highest Alemannisch (several in central Switzerland).
Standard German is the language of instruction in school.
Standard German is taught in some primary schools, and used in local newspapers.
www.ethnologue.com /show_language.asp?code=gsw   (311 words)

  
 languagehat.com: SWISS GERMAN DRIVING OUT STANDARD?
The situation of Swiss German is uncannily similar to that of Cantonese in HK (although perhaps heading in opposite directions).
Swiss German does not exist per se but is actually a collection of different quite distinct dialects.
Swiss German has always been the language of choice for informal conversation (SMS and email are just modern examples for it).
www.languagehat.com /archives/002410.php   (3663 words)

  
 Swiss culture - culture in Switzerland : Standard languages and dialects   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Swiss chickens: the French word "poulet" is commonly used in Swiss High German, but not in other parts of the German speaking world.
In Switzerland, High German is first and foremost a written language, which Swiss German children have to learn in school.
Teachers in the German part of Switzerland complain that many pupils find it difficult to master standard German, and that their studies suffer as a result.
www.swissworld.org /eng/swissworld.html?siteSect=601&sid=4039995&rubricId=14010   (1057 words)

  
 A more advanced Swiss-German page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Please don't understand this as if the proper German is the "original" and that the Swiss have developed their own kind of dialect from this.
In the Swiss German way of speaking, the first syllable of the word almost always has the stress, even when it is one of the many words from French.
The reason is simply that Swiss German has quite an amount of words that you won't find (or at least they don't seem to be the same) in other languages.
www.eldrid.ch /advanced.htm   (1484 words)

  
 _ swiss german language speak speaking Switzerland guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
No one speaks High German in everyday situations in Switzerland – oral use of High German is restricted to school education, the mass media and public speaking.
Everybody writes in High German (which is also the language of all signs and public notices) – but when reading out loud, they mentally transcribe the High German text into their own dialect of Swiss-German as they’re going along.
Many High German words simply aren’t used: guten Tag (hello) is grüezi in Swiss-German; Straßenbahn (tram) is Tram; Fahrrad (bicycle) is Velo; while regional differences mean that Wiese (meadow) is Wise in St Gallen but Matte in Bern.
switzerland.isyours.com /e/guide/contexts/german.html   (823 words)

  
 German   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Prerequisite: German 1 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent skill level.
Readings consist of selections dealing with German, Swiss and Austrian contributions in the fields of arts, sciences and literature, further study of German civilization, and modern developments in Germany.
Prerequisite: German 2 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent skill level.
www.lavc.cc.ca.us /German.html   (432 words)

  
 Card Games: General rules for Swiss Jass
Many of the most popular card games in Switzerland, especially in the German speaking cantons, belong to the Jass group, and are played with characteristic Swiss cards, which have come to be known as Jass cards.
Swiss Jass games have a number of features in common, which will be described on this page, to save repetition elsewhere.
The Under of trumps is called the Puur (Swiss version of the word Bauer, meaning peasant, which in the form Bower also appears in Euchre).
www.pagat.com /jass/swjass.html   (1710 words)

  
 Language Reference Guide For Swiss German
High German, or Hochdeutsch (also known as Schriftdeutsch, "Written German") is the same language used throughout German-speaking Europe.
The written German variety used in Switzerland follows all standard German grammar rules with the exception of a few stylistic and idiomatic idiosyncrasies.
In Switzerland, [standard] High German is first and foremost a written language, which Swiss German children have to learn in school.
www.translationdirectory.com /article926.htm   (1153 words)

  
 Swiss German Language | Information, articles, resources and Swiss German Language reference guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Alemannic German Alemannic is an Upper German dialect family of the German language.
German Translation & Interpretation Unlike most dialects in modern Europe, Swiss German is the spoken everyday language of all social levels in industrial cities as well as in the countryside...
german language tape, german language philosopher, german language newspaper, german language training, swiss german language, german language resource teaching, german language resource, course...
www.osula2.net /germanlanguage/swissgermanlanguage   (1632 words)

  
 A quick guide to the Swiss German language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Swiss German has its own pronunciation, many different words, its own grammar, and most Germans have difficulties understanding this funny language.
The German-speaking Swiss write the proper German, that's true - there is not really a Swiss German written language.
The proper German version that you see here is to be pronounced the normal German way.
www.eldrid.ch /swgerman.htm   (692 words)

  
 Learn Swiss German - PureLanguage.ca
Outstanding Features: Two forms of German are used in Switzerland; "High" German is used only in its written form, and Swiss German is what is spoken.
Swiss German, or Schwyzertütsch, is unrecognizable to speakers of "High" German and thus merits its own Pimsleur program
However, your Pimsleur Swiss German program will safely carry you through any areas where Swiss German is spoken.
www.purelanguage.ca /german-swiss.html   (170 words)

  
 German Accent Codes
Note that Pennsylvania Dutch, spoken in the Amish community and elsewhere, is a High German dialect.
Plattdeutsch) refers to the group of Germanic languages coming from coastal Europe (lowlands) and actually includes English and Dutch as well as related forms spoken in the Saxony region of Germany.
Low German refers to the geography of its origin, not to a divergence from a national standard.
tlt.its.psu.edu /suggestions/international/bylanguage/german.html#winalt   (720 words)

  
 Swiss German Travel Phrases
Swiss German (Schwyzerdütsch) / Allemannisch is a form of German used in Switzerland and parts of the bordering countries of Austria, France, Germany, and Liechtenstein.
The Bernese dialect is used in parts of the Swiss canton of Bern
Walliserdeutsch is used in parts of the Swiss canton of Wallis / Valais
www.travelphrases.info /languages/Allemannisch.htm   (151 words)

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