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Topic: Symmachus the Ebionite


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  Symmachus the Ebionite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Symmachus the Ebionite (late 2nd century CE), was the author of one of the Greek versions of the Old Testament that were included by Origen in his Hexapla and Tetrapla, which compared various versions of the old Testament side by side with the Septuagint.
Some fragments of Symmachus' version that survive in what remains of the Hexapla inspire scholars to remark on the purity and idiomatic elegance of Symmachus' Greek, which was admired by Jerome, who used it freely in composing the Vulgate.
The Ebionites were practising Jews, mainly in Israel, Syria and Cappadocia, who accepted Jesus as the Messiah, without accepting the virgin birth and other dogma that were increasingly insisted upon by Pauline Christians, who eventually rejected the Ebionites as heretics.
www.encyclopedia-1.com /s/sy/symmachus_the_ebionite.html   (273 words)

  
 Ebionites - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ebionites (from Hebrew; Ebionim, "the poor ones") were a sect of Judean followers of John the Baptizer and Jesus (Yeshua in Aramaic) who existed in Judea (later Palestine) during the early centuries of the Common Era.
Since the early Ebionites clearly did believe in the ability of Jesus to perform powerful miracles, it may be possible that the charges of their denying his divinity, etc. were merely propaganda on the part of the patristic sources, eager to paint them as heretics.
Ebionites believed that all followers of Jesus, whether they be Jewish or Gentile, must adhere to Noahide Laws and Mosaic law through an either more restorative (Essene) or progressive (Pharisee) interpretation and observance, tempered with the wisdom teachings of Jesus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ebionites   (1641 words)

  
 Ebionites   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
The Ebionites (from Hebrew; Ebionim, "the poor ones") were a sect of Judean followers of John the Baptizer and later Jesus (Yeshua in Aramaic) which existed in Judea and Palestine during the early centuries of the Common Era.
It seems that the Ebionites also rejected the doctrine of atonement for sin through the death of Jesus, and judged sightings of the risen Jesus as spiritual experiences such as dreams and visions rather than an actual physical resurrection.
Ebionites believed that all followers of Jesus, whether they be Judean or Gentile, must adhere to Noahide Laws and Mosaic law through an either more restorative (Essene) or progressive (Pharisee) interpretation and observance, tempered with the wisdom teachings of Jesus.
pedia.newsfilter.co.uk /wikipedia/e/eb/ebionites.html   (778 words)

  
 Ebionite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Virtually no writings of the Ebionites have survived, (but seebelow) except as excerpted in the writings of orthodox Christian theologians,such as Irenaeus, Hippolytus, and Tertullian, who considered the Ebionites to be " heretics." Pauline Christians sometimes distinguished Ebionites as separate from the Nazarenes, one author often depending upon another for his assessment.
It seems that the Ebionites also rejected the doctrine of atonement for sinthrough the death of Jesus, and judged sightings of the risen Jesus as spiritual experiences such as dreams and visions ratherthan an actual physical resurrection.
Ebionites believed that all followers of Jesus, whetherthey be Judean or Gentile, must adhere to Noahide Laws and Mosaic law through an either morerestorative (Essene) or progressive (Pharisee) interpretation and observance, tempered with the wisdom teachings of Jesus.
www.therfcc.org /ebionite-141212.html   (688 words)

  
 Symmachus the Ebionite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Symmachus the Ebionite (late 2nd century CE), was the author of one of the Greek versions of the OldTestament that were included by Origen in his Hexapla and Tetrapla, which comparedvarious versions of the old Testament side by side with the Septuagint.
Somefragments of Symmachus' version that survive in what remains of the Hexapla inspire scholars to remark on the purity andidiomatic elegance of Symmachus' Greek, which was admired by Jerome, whoused it freely in composing the Vulgate.
The Ebionites were practising Jews, mainly in Israel, Syria and Cappadocia,who accepted Jesus as the Messiah, without accepting the virgin birth and other dogma that were increasingly insisted upon byPauline Christians, who eventually rejected the Ebionites as heretics.
www.therfcc.org /RFCC/symmachus-the-ebionite-99098.html   (263 words)

  
 Symmachus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Symmachus can refer to several different people of Roman antiquity.
Symmachus the Ebionite (late 2nd century CE), was the author of one of the Greek versions of the Old Testament.
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus, c.340–c.402, was a Roman politician.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Symmachus   (115 words)

  
 Ebionites biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Pauline Christians sometimes distinguished the Ebionites from the Nazarenes, one author often depending upon another for his assessment.
It seems that the Ebionites also rejected the doctrine of atonement for sin through the death of Jesus, and judged posthumous sightings of Jesus as spiritual experiences such as dreams and visions rather than an actual physical resurrection.
Therefore, they rejected as a lie Paul's assertion, in his letter to the Philippians (3:5), that he was "circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; in regard to the law, a Pharisee" (TNIV).
ebionite.biography.ms   (860 words)

  
 Ancient Hostile Witnesses
The Ebionites, following these, assert that He was begotten by Joseph; thus destroying, as far as in them lies, such a marvelous dispensation of God, and setting aside the testimony of the prophets which proceeded from God.
But the heresy of the Ebionites, as it is called, asserts that Christ was the son of Joseph and Mary, considering him a mere man, and insists strongly on keeping the law in a Jewish manner, as we have seen already in this history.
Commentaries of Symmachus are still extant in which he appears to support this heresy by attacking the Gospel of Matthew.
www.ebionite.org /ancwt.htm   (2154 words)

  
 Ebionites   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
The Ebionites''' (from Hebrew languageHebrew; '''Ebionim, "the poor ones") were a sect of Judean followers of John the BaptistJohn the Baptizer and later Jesus (''Yeshua'' in Aramaic) which existed in Judea and Palestine during the early centuries of the Common Era/.
It seems that the Ebionites also rejected the doctrine of atonement for sin through the death of Jesus, and judged posthumous sightings of Jesus as spiritual experiences such as dreams and visions rather than an actual physical Resurrection of Jesus resurrection/.
Ebionites believed that all followers of Jesus, whether they be Jewish or Gentile, must adhere to Noahide Laws and Mosaic law through an either more restorative (EssenesEssene) or progressive (Pharisee/) interpretation and observance, tempered with the wisdom teachings of Jesus.
www.infothis.com /find/Ebionites   (893 words)

  
 Comparative Index to Islam : EBIONITES
Most of the features of Ebionite doctrine were anticipated in the teachings of the earlier Qumran sect, as revealed in the Dead Sea Scrolls.
In Eusebius and Origen, they talked about the Ebionites being a two-fold sect, while the others do not make the distinction, and some scholars considered that Eusebius and Origen were confusing them with another group called the Nazarenes.
The Ebionites believed that any one can be a christ, but Muslims seemed to have a different idea of Messiahship.
www.answering-islam.org /Index/E/ebionites.html   (1372 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ebionites
The name may have been self-imposed by those who gladly claimed the beatitude of being poor in spirit, or who claimed to live after the pattern of the first Christians in Jerusalem, who laid their goods at the feet of the Apostles.
The milder sort of Ebionites were probably fewer and less important than their stricter brethren, because the denial of the virgin birth was commonly attributed to all.
These Ebionite Gnostics differed widely from the main schools of Gnosticism, in that they absolutely rejected any distinction between Jehovah the Demiurge, and the Supreme Good God.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/05242c.htm   (1506 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Symmachus the Ebionite
Symmachus also wrote "Commentaries", not extant, apparently to support the heresy of the Ebionites by attacking the Gospel of St. Matthew.
et pond., xvi), that Symmachus flourished in the age of Severus (193-211), but the text of Epiphanius is full of the wildest blunders.
Epiphanius says further that Symmachus was a Samaritan who having quarrelled with his own people went over to Judaism, but all other ancient authorities are unanimous in making him an Ebionite.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14378a.htm   (443 words)

  
 Symmachus
Quintus Aurelius Symmachus, c.340-c.402, held the offices of proconsol of Africa in 373, urban Prefect of Rome in 384 and 385, and consul in 391.
A prominent pagan, Symmachus was an opponent of Ambrosius, archbishop of Milan.
He fought against the removal of the altar of Victory from the Senate House.
www.fact-index.com /s/sy/symmachus.html   (434 words)

  
 Dictionary of Meaning www.mauspfeil.net
Some fragments of Symmachus' version that survive in what remains of the Hexapla inspire scholars to remark on the purity and idiomatic elegance of Symmachus' Greek, which was admired by Saint Jerome Jerome, who used it freely in composing the Vulgate.
Origen states that he obtained these and others of Symmachus' commentaries on the scriptures from a certain Juliana, who, he says, inherited them from Symmachus himself" (Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius, ''Historia Ecclesiae''.
There you find a list of all editors and the possibility to edit the original text of the article Symmachus the Ebionite.
www.mauspfeil.net /Symmachus_the_Ebionite.html   (337 words)

  
 Symmachus the Ebionite Definition / Symmachus the Ebionite Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Symmachus the Ebionite Definition / Symmachus the Ebionite Research
Symmachus the Ebionite (late 2nd century CE), was the author of one of the Greek versions of the Old Testament that were included by OrigenOrigen was a Christian scholar and theologian and one of the most distinguished of the Fathers of the early Christian Church.
He was born about 182, probably at Alexandria, and died at Caesarea not later than 251....
www.elresearch.com /Symmachus_the_Ebionite   (339 words)

  
 Chapter 32: Texts, Manuscripts and Translations
Only fragments remain of the work of Symmachus who, near the end of the second century, made a Greek translation from the Hebrew text.
According to Jerome, Symmachus was an Ebionite, but Epiphanus says he was a Samaritan who became a Jewish proselyte.
Ebionites were Jewish Christians who maintained Jewish customs and attitudes.
www.infidels.org /library/modern/gerald_larue/otll/chap32.html   (4987 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Symmachus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Symmachus the Ebionite (late 2nd century), was the author of one of the Greek versions of the Old Testament.
If an article link referred you here, you might want to go back and fix it to point directly to the intended page.
Categories: Disambiguation Symmachus was pope from 498 to 514.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Symmachus   (212 words)

  
 Version Descriptions
According to nearly all ancient authorities Symmachus was an Ebionite; on the other hand Epiphanius said that he was a Samaritan convert to Judaism.
It was a stupendous task that required the diligent labour of nearly a quarter of a century.
When the LXX disagreed with the Hebrew text it was brought into harmony with it by the use of the other Greek versions and diacritical markings.
www.nisbett.com /versions/bible03.htm   (8995 words)

  
 "Theories of the Translation Process" by Bruce M. Metzger
This was by Symmachus, an Ebionite Christian of Jewish background.
To judge from the scattered fragments that remain of his translation, Symmachus tended to be paraphrastic in representing the Hebrew original.
On the one hand in his letter to Sunnia and Fretela, Jerome declared that the work of a good translator consists in rendering idiomatic expressions of one language into the modes of expression native to the other.
www.biblicalstudies.org.uk /article_trans_metzger2.html   (3506 words)

  
 Davide's Notes: Origen's life
He lived in the house of Juliana, heir of Symmachus, the ebionite translator of the Septuagint.
I found this written in a very old book of verses, in which had been written by Origen's hand: "I found this book at the house of Juliana the virgin at Caesarea, when I was hidden by her.
Commentaries of Symmachus are still extant in which he appears to support this heresy [of the Ebionites] by attacking the Gospel of Matthew.
www.salomoni.it /davide/theology/blog/2005/02/origens-life.html   (3809 words)

  
 NPNF (V2-01) (iii.xi.xvii)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
Origen states that he obtained these and other commentaries of Symmachus on the Scriptures from a certain Juliana,
On Symmachus, see the previous chapter, note 4.
On the attitude of the Ebionites toward the Canonical Gospel of Matthew (to which of course Eusebius here refers), see ibid.
www.ccel.org /ccel/schaff/npnf201.iii.xi.xvii.html   (306 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Symmachus the Ebionite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
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www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Symmachus-the-Ebionite   (322 words)

  
 Bible Query from the Old Testament
Symmachus: The Ebionites were a Christian cult that held to many Jewish practices and did not believe Jesus was God.
Symmachus the Ebionite made a translation in the second century.
Theodotion was another Ebionite who made a translation in the same century.
www.christian-faith.com /bible-answers/ot.htm   (5104 words)

  
 Beliefnet.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
The SeptuagintA renders the name as Baalzeboub, SeptuagintB as Baal myîan 'Baal of flies' but Symmachus the Ebionite rendered it as Beelzeboul for reasons unknown.
It is unknown whether Symmachus was correct in identifying these names or not since we otherwise know nothing about either of them.
Zeboul might derive from a slurred pronunciation of zebûb; from 'zebel', a word used to mean 'dung' in the Targums; or from Hebrew zebûl found in 1 Kings 8.13 in the phrase bêt-zebûl 'lofty house' and used in Rabbinical writings to mean 'house' or 'temple' and also as the name for the fourth heaven.
www.beliefnet.com /boards/message_list.asp?boardID=28081&discussionID=410093   (866 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-11)
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 Essene Chronology
Paul of Tarsus converts to "Apostle to the Gentiles" and the main activity of Christianity, according to mainline scholars but not according to Essene Scholars, shifts from the Hellenic-Jewish-Christians of Judea Samaria, and Galilee (Nazarenes "of Nazareth" and Ebionites "poor ones") to the Gentile-Christians led by Paul and centered in the church of Corinth...
65-350: "Essene (Jewish-Christian) Gospels": 7 fragments of Gospel of the Ebionites and 7 fragments of Gospel of the Hebrews in Greek; 36 fragments of Gospel of the Nazarenes in Aramaic
: Hebrew, Hebrew transliterated in Greek, Aquila's Greek trans., Symmachus' Greek trans., Origen's revised LXX Greek trans., Theodotion's revised LXX; also Quinta/Sexta/Septima trans., Tetragrammaton in square Hebrew script; cites "Alexandrian" and "Caesarean" NT text-types; Eusebius claimed Or.
www.essene.com /Church/EsseneChronology.htm   (7412 words)

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