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Topic: Takeda Katsuyori


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In the News (Tue 25 Jun 19)

  
  Takeda Shingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The future of all of Japan was now in the balance, as Takeda Shingen, at 49 years of age, was the one daimyo with the power, position, and skill necessary to stop Oda Nobunaga's headlong rush to ruling the land of Japan.
Takeda Shingen appears in the epic film Heaven and Earth (not to be confused with Oliver Stone's Vietnam war drama), seen from Uesugi Kenshin's point of view.
Takeda Shingen is the main character in the NES game Shingen the Ruler, and his conquests are also portrayed in the PC game, Takeda.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Takeda_Shingen   (2046 words)

  
 Takeda Shingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Shingen (武田 信玄 Takeda Shingen) (December 1, 1521 – May 13, 1573) of Shinano and Kai Provinces, was a preeminent daimyo who fought for control of Japan during that country's Sengoku or "warring states" period.
After Shingen died in 1573 (due to an illness that, according to one theory, resulted from a musket ball wound), Katsuyori Takeda took control of the Takeda.
Ieyasu seized the opportunity and defeated the weak Takeda led by Takeda Katsuyori in the battle of.
www.hartselle.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Takeda_Shingen   (842 words)

  
 Takeda Katsuyori
Takeda Katsuyori was a younger son of Takeda Shingen and prior to Shingen's death, the head of the Suwa Clan.
Shingen avoided possible controversy by naming Katsuyori the head of the Suwa Clan (hence the 'Yôri' in his name); as Suwa Katsuyori he was removed from the Takeda family to a greater or lesser degree, and posed no threat to the heir, Takeda Yoshinobu.
In the meantime, Katsuyori was to act as guardian.
www.samurai-archives.com /katsuyori.html   (1135 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Tokugawa Ieyasu
Takeda Shingen died in 1573, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Takeda Katsuyori, who managed to capture the fort of Taketenjin in 1574.
The Oda-Tokugawa force of 38,000 inflicted a devastating defeat to the Takeda on June 28, 1575, although for the next several years, Takeda Katsuyori continued to raid Tokugawa and Oda territory frequently.
Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝頼: 1546 – 1582) was the son of Takeda Shingen and father of Takeda Nobukatsu and Takeda Katsuchika.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Tokugawa-Ieyasu   (7039 words)

  
 Takeda Katsuyori - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝頼: 1546 1582) was the son of Takeda Shingen and father of Takeda Nobukatsu and Takeda Katsuchika.
Katsuyori incurred the wrath of the Hojo family by helping Uesugi Kagekatsu against Uesugi Kagetora who was Hojo Ujiyasu's seventh son, adopted by and heir to Uesugi Kenshin.
His forces were destroyed by the combined armies of Oda Nobunaga and Tokugawa Ieyasu at Temmokuzan in 1582, after which Katsuyori and his son Nobukatsu committed suicide.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Takeda_Katsuyori   (234 words)

  
 JUSSHUKÔ
Princess Yaegaki grieves the death of his betrothed Katsuyori, burning some incense in front of a portrait of the young man. She is in her room, on the right side of the stage.
Katsuyori, disguised as the gardener Minosaku but wearing high-nobility garments, appears in the middle of the stage, between the 2 rooms and is moved by the grievings of the 2 women.
Katsuyori is surprised by the will and love of Yaegaki and asks her a token of love: the sacred helmet enshrined in Lake Suwa, which originally belongs to Takeda Shingen but is now in the hands of the Nagao clan.
www.kabuki21.com /jusshuko.php   (617 words)

  
 Battle of Nagashino - TheBestLinks.com - Japan, Oda Nobunaga, Samurai, Tokugawa Ieyasu, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Katsuyori besieged Okudaira Nobumasa at Nagashino Castle in 1573.
The Takeda army is known to have a deep knowledge of tactics and it is unimaginable for them to attack head on into well-constructed barricades that were visible from far away.
Takeda never recovered from this loss and was exterminated in 1582.
www.thebestlinks.com /Battle_of_Nagashino.html   (368 words)

  
 Encyclopedia of Japanese History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Okabe Naganori held the castle for the Takeda.
Katsuyori took charge of the family after the death of his father.
Fought Tokugawa Ieyasu at Takatenjin in 1574 and at Nagashino in 1575.
www.openhistory.org /jhdp/encyclopedia/t.html   (1820 words)

  
 Yoshitaki
Thrown into all of this high drama is a sacred helmet revered by the Takeda and which had been left in safekeeping in the hands of a shrine which handed it over to the Nagao clan.
Katsuyori remembers that this is the first anniversary of his supposed suicide.
Yaegakihime looks out into the garden and sees Katsuyori believing that her "incense" prayer has been answered, but when she watches him comforting her lady-in-waiting she begins to think he is actually a sentient being.
www.printsofjapan.com /Yoshitaki_Yaegakihime.htm   (1460 words)

  
 Masaru Fujimoto, Volleys that rang the death knell of an age
On that occasion, Takeda Shingen's real aim was to take the symbolic political capital of Kyoto, and his real motive was to tie up Nobunaga's forces in response to a request from Honganji Kennyo, leader of the powerful, Osaka-based Jodo Shinshu sect of Buddhism.
Then, as coalition forces—who had routed the 1,000 Takeda soldiers left at the castle 2 km away—joined the fray, the Takeda men found themselves caught in a deadly sandwich and began fleeing in panic.
A son of Shingen, Katsuyori was raised as a brave warrior.
www.hartford-hwp.com /archives/55a/403.html   (1359 words)

  
 Battle of Nagashino   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Both Tokugawa and Oda Nobunaga sent troops to alleviate the siege and Takeda Katsuyori was defeated.
Ironically, while Takeda's cavalry charge represents the old, traditional, means of warfare, it was invented by his father, Takeda Shingen, less than a generation earlier.
In the film, a wayward thief is recruited to impersonate the dead Takeda Shingen in the years preceding Takeda Katsuyori's defeat at Nagashino.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/B/Battle-of-Nagashino.htm   (515 words)

  
 history   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
At that time, Takeda Shingen had already died for some year and it was his fourth son, Takeda Katsuyori who was leading Takeda house on a continuous invasion toward Tokugawa's domain.
Katsuyori could be a brave samurai, but surely he was not a rational leader.
Katsuyori survived, but without his powerful calvary, soon his domain was divided and conquered by Oda and eventually, Katsuyori committed 'sepuku', the samurai's suicide.
www.cse.unsw.edu.au /~gaop/history.html   (794 words)

  
 The Fall of the Takeda Clan
Katsuyori had 3000 men remain at Nagashino castle to guard it, while he led the rest of his army, 12,000 men, to the Shidarahara plain.
Katsuyori's clan was now indeed falling apart and in shambles, but it was nothing compared to what was to come.
Takeda Shingen, like his son, was the ruler of Kai and Shinano and a few other provinces.
www.samurai-archives.com /ftk.html   (1889 words)

  
 100   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the summer of 1575, Takeda Katsuyori led his army into the Tokugawa domain and laid siege to Nagashino Castle, a locally important strongpoint that had changed hands a number of times in the past few years.
Takeda Shingen invaded Totomi and Mino and repeatedly defeated the Oda and Tokugawa alliance.
Takeda Shingen was perhaps the most storied warrior of the era and it is unfortunate that he died when he did or it might have been he and not Tokugawa who united Japan.
www.students.dsu.edu /margadj/100.htm   (3421 words)

  
 China History Forum, online chinese history forum > Horses in Japan?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Shingen, for example, is usually portrayed as a great man and a fine figure of a daimyo, yet this same Shingen gained power in the first place by ousting his father, Nobutora, who lived out his years under house arrest.
The Takeda launched their charge upon the Oda/Tokugawa barricades believing that the arquebusiers would only have time to fire off one volley before the horsemen fell upon them as they tried to reload, after which the barricades could be easily breached.
The Takeda horsemen were slowed down by having to cross a shallow river during the charge, and they were dispersed along the barricade line in several waves, rather than in a massed, concentrated thrust.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /lofiversion/index.php/t2468.html   (3272 words)

  
 Takeda Shingen Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Shingen (武田 信玄) (1521 - 1573) of the Shinano and Kai provinces, was one of the preeminent daimyos who fought for control of Japan during that country's Sengoku or "warring states" period.
At Mitaka, Takeda Shingen easily defeated the combined armies of Oda Nobunaga and Tokugawa Ieyasu; but he could not defeat old age.
After Shingen died in 1573 (due to an illness that resulted from a musket ball wound), Ieyasu seized the opportunity and defeated his son Takeda Katsuyori in Tenmokuzan.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Takeda_Shingen.html   (215 words)

  
 The Real-Life Oda Nobunaga In His Thirties and Forties, 1571 - 1582   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
But Takeda got shot by a Tokugawa soldier and died on Ashikaga just before the war got anywhere (click here for story and pictures), although this death was kept a secret for the next three years just as Takeda's testament said.
The Takeda clan of Kai was politically no more after the famous battle of Nagashino (click here for movie scenes or here for the real thing).
Yet, fightings between the Takedas and Tokugawas were still extant and both sides became engrossed in mutual raiding expeditions to and fro betwen Mikawa and Kai.
www.geocities.com /azuchiwind/oda5.htm   (3474 words)

  
 Takeda Shingen
'''Takeda Shingen''' (武田信玄) (December 1, 1521 – May 13, 1573) of Shinano and Kai Provinces, was a preeminent daimyo who fought for control of Japan during that country's Sengoku or "warring states" period.
Shingen Takeda is known as The Tiger of Kai and was a major warlord during the Sengoku-Jidai period.
However Shingen Takeda died soon after and his son Katsuyori would bring the clan to ruin by trying (unsuccessfully) to fulfill the ambition of his father by further pressing onto Tokugawa lands.
www.keywordmage.net /ta/takeda-shingen.html   (675 words)

  
 POTTED BIOGRAPHIES OF HISTORICAL FIGURES MENTIONED IN THE SAMURAI
His most famous exploit was his night attack on the forces of Takeda Katsuyori in the autumn of 1581 at Ukishinagahara in Suruga Province, using his four groups to harass constantly Katsuyori's men.
They stole Takeda horses, and concealed themselves by securing themselves to the horses sides, so that when the horses were brought back into the camp by the Takeda samurai, the Fuma opened fire as the horses dashed about.
Takeda Shingen (1521~1573): Eldest son of Nobutora who planned to disinherit him in favour of a younger brother, so Shingen got in first and attacked his father and placed him the custody of his father-in-law, Imagawa Yoshimoto, in 1540.
www.home.netspeed.com.au /reguli/samhist.htm   (2668 words)

  
 Twilight of the Takeda Clan of Kai   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Shingen (1467-1573), warlord of Kai mountains (or Yamanashi today), was a worthy descendant of the Minamoto clan (click here for story and pictures).
Takeda Katsuyori (1546-1582), Shingen's son, in a most grotesque moment of the movie: he doesn't seize the Takatenjin castle -- he burns it to the ground.
Takeda Shingen's funeral in 1575, three years after his death, is the sign of the twilight of the clan.
uk.geocities.com /rainforestwind/ryu2.htm   (2008 words)

  
 TOKUGAWA IEYASU FACTS AND INFORMATION
He and Takeda_Shingen, the head of the Takeda clan, in Kai, entered a pact, where they together would annex the rest of the Imagawa territory.
Takeda Katsuyori, as well as his eldest son and heir, Takeda_Nobukatsu, commited harakiri.
It is said that Ieyasu expressed compassion at the decapited head Takeda_Katsuyori after the fall of Takeda clan.
www.palfacts.com /Tokugawa_Ieyasu   (3460 words)

  
 Flagship Games Presents... The Battle of Nagashino!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
When Takeda Katsuyori realized that this mighty force was on its way, he organized his army, leaving behind a small force of some 3,000 men to continue the siege, and rode out to meet the relief force.
Although he was outnumbered by over 2:1, the Takeda cavalry had a well deserved reputation and had a good chance of defeating the enemy if all went their way.
The Takeda have taken all the outer works, and the defenders are left to defend the inner castle itself.
www.flagshipgames.com /taiko1xx.htm   (1392 words)

  
 Takeda Katsuyori -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Katsuyori (武田勝頼: 1546 – 1582) was the son of (Click link for more info and facts about Takeda Shingen) Takeda Shingen and father of Takeda Nobukatsu and Takeda Katsuchika.
After his elder brother (Click link for more info and facts about Takeda Yoshinobu) Takeda Yoshinobu died, Katsuyori's son Nobukatsu became heir to the Takeda clan, making Katsuyori de facto ruler of the Takeda clan.
Katsuyori incurred the wrath of the Hojo family by helping (Click link for more info and facts about Uesugi Kagekatsu) Uesugi Kagekatsu against Uesugi Kagetora who was Hojo Ujiyasu's seventh son, adopted by and heir to (Click link for more info and facts about Uesugi Kenshin) Uesugi Kenshin.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/t/ta/takeda_katsuyori.htm   (251 words)

  
 Anayama Nobukimi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
1582), also known as Baisetsu Nobukimi, was a nephew of Takeda Shingen, and one of his ''.
He fought for his uncle at and Nagashino before defecting to the service of Tokugawa Ieyasu, aiding him in his campaign against Takeda Katsuyori.
He was rewarded by Tokugawa for his service, with a fief in Kai Province, but he was killed by Takeda sympathizers soon afterwards.
www.southhouston.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Anayama_Nobukimi   (138 words)

  
 Shop Fresh : Article 'Takeda'   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda had extensive training in several martial arts (including Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage ryu and sumo) and referred to the style he taught as Daito Ryu.
Sokaku Takeda's third son, Tokimune Takeda, became the headmaster of the art following the death of Sokaku Takeda in 1943.
Tokimune Takeda taught what he called Aikibudo, an art that included the sword techniques of the Ono-ha Itto ryu along with the traditional techniques of Daito ryu aikijujutsu.
www.shop-fresh.net /DisplayArticle884185.html   (772 words)

  
 Kagemusha (1980 || Japan)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Kagemusha (shadow warrior in Japanese) is the story of a thief who is to be hanged, but is saved by a warlord's brother, Nobukado Takeda, because of a peculiar resemblance to the king Shingen Takeda.
Shingen's son Katsuyori, who knows that he is the double, is convinced that his father did this to spite him.
Katsuyori was passed over as king and that position was granted to Shingen's grandson and Katsuyori 's son Takemaru as soon as he reaches of mature age.
www.softcom.net /users/chuckmc/entertainment/movies/kagemusha.htm   (459 words)

  
 Dragon Motifs and Collectible Fantasy Swords Knives Daggers and More! - Samurai Sword of Takeda Shingen   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Takeda Shingen of Shinano and Kai Provinces, was a preeminent daimyo who fought for control of Japan during that country's Sengoku or "warring states" period.
At Mitaka, Takeda Shingen easily defeated the combined armies of Oda Nobunaga and Tokugawa Ieyasu, but he cound not defeat old age.
After Shingen died in 1573, Ieyasu took the opportunity and defeated his son Takeda Katsuyori in Tenmokuzan.
www.dragonscavern.com /shop/catalog/Samurai_Sword_of_Takeda_Shingen_p_177.html   (192 words)

  
 [No title]
His son, Katsuyori, succeeded his father and began another march to the capital, but now Nobunaga's forces stand in the Takeda army's way.
Defeat Condition- Shingen Takeda is defeated or the Takeda Cavalry is obliterated.
The Takeda Clan began a march towards the capital to control the Imperial Court.
www.cheatcc.com /psx2/sg/samurai_warriors.txt   (17200 words)

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