Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Temperature


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Temperature conversion calculators for metric and imperial units
Temperature conversion calculators for metric and imperial units
Fahrenheit established 0°F as the stabilized temperature when equal amounts of ice, water, and salt are mixed.
He then defined 96°F as the temperature "when the thermometer is held in the mouth or under the armpit of a living man in good health."
www.metric-conversions.org /temperature-conversion.htm   (195 words)

  
  About Temperature
One of the first attempts to make a standard temperature scale occurred about AD 170, when Galen, in his medical writings, proposed a standard "neutral" temperature made up of equal quantities of boiling water and ice; on either side of this temperature were four degrees of heat and four degrees of cold, respectively.
Thermodynamic temperature is the fundamental temperature; its unit is the kelvin which is defined as the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water.
Temperature is a measure of the energy of thermal motion and, at a temperature of zero, the energy reaches a minimum (quantum mechanically, the zero-point motion remains at 0 K).
eo.ucar.edu /skymath/tmp2.html   (4839 words)

  
  Temperature
To ensure that the temperature of the surrounding air is the same as the thermometer, it must be shaded from sunlight and be exposed to adequate ventilation.
Absolute zero, the coldest temperature possible in the universe is 0K or -273°C. Because one Kelvin is equivalent to one degree Celsius, 0°C is the same as 273K.
Thermometers are also used to measure the temperature of the ground at night, which may fall several degrees below that of the air above, and to calculate the humidity of air.
www.ace.mmu.ac.uk /eae/Weather/Older/Temperature.html   (311 words)

  
  Temperature
A convenient operational definition of temperature is that it is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy associated with the disordered microscopic motion of atoms and molecules.
Temperature is not directly proportional to internal energy since temperature measures only the kinetic energy part of the internal energy, so two objects with the same temperature do not in general have the same internal energy (see water-metal example).
Temperatures are measured in one of the three standard temperature scales (Celsius, Kelvin, and Fahrenheit).
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu /hbase/thermo/temper.html   (422 words)

  
  Temperature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Temperature arises from the random microscopic motions of the atomic and subatomic constituents of matter, where temperature is related to the average energy of these microscopic motions.
Temperature is measured with thermometers that may be calibrated to a variety of temperature scales.
The temperature of an object is proportional to the average kinetic energy of the molecules in it.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Temperature   (3010 words)

  
 temperature. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Temperature is measured by means of a thermometer or other instrument having a scale calibrated in units called degrees.
On the Celsius temperature scale, or centigrade scale, the melting point is taken as 0°C and the boiling point as 100°C, and the difference between them is divided into 100 degrees.
The Kelvin temperature scale is an absolute scale having degrees the same size as those of the Celsius temperature scale; the Rankine temperature scale is an absolute scale having degrees the same size as those of the Fahrenheit temperature scale.
www.bartleby.com /65/te/temperat.html   (408 words)

  
 Temperature - Simple English Wikipedia
Temperature is often measured in degrees CelsiusC).
Water freezes at a temperature of 0 °C, 32 °F, or 273.15 K. The temperature of the human body is close to 37 °C or 98 °F. Water boils at 100 °C, 212 °F, or 373.15 K. The coldest temperature is absolute zero.
Temperature is how hot or cold a thing is. Heat is how much energy is in the small and fast movements (vibration) of its molecules.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Temperature   (340 words)

  
 Gas Temperature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The temperature of a gas is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy of the molecules.
The first principle is the observation that the temperature of an object can affect some physical property of the object, such as the length of a solid, or the gas pressure in a closed vessel, or the electrical resistance of a wire.
Absolute temperatures are used in the equation of state, the derivation of the state variables enthalpy, and entropy, and determining the speed of sound.
www.grc.nasa.gov /WWW/K-12/airplane/temptr.html   (1076 words)

  
 Temperature
Temperature is a measure of the amount of heat energy possessed by an object (see the Energy lesson for more on this concept).
Because temperature is a relative measurement, scales based on reference points must be used to accurately measure temperature.
The temperature of an ice-water (no salt) mixture was set at 30 degrees and the temperature of the human body was set at 96 degrees.
www.visionlearning.com /library/module_viewer.php?mid=48&l=&c3=   (755 words)

  
 Temperature Encyclopedia Article @ NaturalResearch.org (Natural Research)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Temperature is the physical property of a system that underlies the common notions of "hot" and "cold"; something that is hotter has the greater temperature.
Temperature arises from the random microscopic motions of the atomic and subatomic constituents of matter.
For everyday applications, it is often convenient to use the Celsius scale, in which 0 °C corresponds to the temperature at which water freezes and 100 °C corresponds to the boiling point of water at sea level.
www.naturalresearch.org /encyclopedia/Temperature   (2419 words)

  
 College of Chemistry - University of California at Berkeley - Temperature Conversion Calculator
Temperature may be defined as the condition of a body which determines the transfer of heat to or from other bodies.
The customary unit of temperature is the Centigrade degree, 1/100 of the difference between the temperature of melting ice and that of water boiling under standard atmospheric pressure.
The fundamental temperature scale is the absolute, thermodynamic, or Kelvin scale in which the temperature measure is based on the average kinetic energy per molecule of a perfect gas.
chemistry.berkeley.edu /links/temperature.html   (252 words)

  
 Temperature - School for Champions: Succeed in Physical Science
The temperature of an object is the average intensity of its thermal energy, which is related to the kinetic energy of the object's molecules.
Since it is difficult to determine the average kinetic energy of a measure the intensity of thermal energy, temperature is used as a relative measurement of that intensity.
Temperature is the average intensity of the thermal energy of an object.
www.school-for-champions.com /science/temperature.htm   (677 words)

  
 Temperature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The relationship between temperature and the thermometric variable may be direct or inverse or it may be determined by a polynomial or power function.
The other reason that the operational definition of temperature is so tightly bound with temperature scales is that the early science of thermometry is tied up with the invention and construction of thermometers.
273.16 is the fundamental interval of the kelvin temperature scale.
hypertextbook.com /physics/thermal/thermo-zero   (2902 words)

  
 Global Climate Change
In fact, a temperature increase of 5 to10 °F (3 to 6 °C) in the United States could result in a decrease in soil moisture of 10 to 30 percent during the summer.
Scientists estimate that mean global temperatures have increased by 0.5 to 1.0 °F (0.3 to 0.6 °C) in the last 100 years.
Changes in temperature appear to be closely related to concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO The figure below displays the concentration of atmospheric CO as well as temperature changes observed during the past 160 thousand years and predicted during the next 10 thousand years.
www.cotf.edu /ete/modules/climate/GCremote3.html   (598 words)

  
 Water on the Web | Understanding | Water Quality | Parameters | Temperature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Therefore, temperature exerts a major influence on the biological activity and growth of aquatic organisms.
An important example of the effects of temperature on water chemistry is its impact on oxygen.
Temperature is reported in degrees on the Celsius temperature scale (C).
waterontheweb.org /under/waterquality/temperature.html   (1447 words)

  
 Sea Surface Temperature Encyclopedia Article @ LocalColorArt.com (Local Color Art)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sea surface temperature (SST) is the water temperature at the surface.
A satellite infra-red radiometer indirectly measures the temperature of a very thin layer (about 10 micrometres thick) or skin of the ocean (leading to the phrase skin temperature) representing the top millimeter; a thermometer attached to a moored or drifting buoy in the ocean would measure the temperature as a specific depth (e.g.
As an aside, away from the immediate sea surface, general temperature measurements are accompanied by a reference to the specific depth of measurment (e.g.
www.localcolorart.com /encyclopedia/Sea_surface_temperature   (1021 words)

  
 temperature
The body temperature of a child generally stays the same as an adult's.
That is to say the "core" temperature stays around 99 -100ºF. The core temperature is the temperature of the blood coming out of the heart.
Measuring the temperature of a person can be slightly tricky depending upon where the temperature is measured.
www.drhull.com /EncyMaster/T/temperature.html   (163 words)

  
 temperature - a definition from Whatis.com
Thermodynamic temperature is a measure of the kinetic energy in molecules or atoms of a substance.
This is the temperature scheme that astronomers use to measure the heat in distant objects such as the sun's corona or the gas and dust between stars.
In the centigrade or Celsius temperature scale, the freezing point of pure water at one atmosphere is assigned the value zero; the boiling point is +100 C. One-degree increments in the centigrade scale are the same size as those in the kelvin scale.
whatis.techtarget.com /definition/0,,sid9_gci553020,00.html   (508 words)

  
 Temperature
Temperature is measured in degrees by using a thermometer.They are rea d in the shade because their measurements are too high when placed in direct sunlight.
Even though temperature changes every day and every season, the Earth's temperature is always in the right range to support life.
The weather is strongly affected by the temperature.
www.windows.ucar.edu /tour/link=/earth/Atmosphere/temperature.html   (162 words)

  
 Temperature
Temperature, on the other hand, is a relative term, and refers to the average kinetic energy of the atoms and molecules in a substance.
Moreover 0 Kelvin has a very deep physical significance: absolute zero, as the name suggests is the lowest temperature that can, even in principle, be achieved in Nature.
It is the temperature associated with empty space that is completely devoid of all all motion and/or energy.
theory.uwinnipeg.ca /mod_tech/node72.html   (212 words)

  
 About Temperature
Thermodynamic temperature is the fundamental temperature; its unit is the kelvin which is defined as the fraction 1/273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water.
Temperature is a measure of the energy of thermal motion and, at a temperature of zero, the energy reaches a minimum (quantum mechanically, the zero-point motion remains at 0 K).
Temperature becomes a quantity definable either in terms of macroscopic thermodynamic quantities such as heat and work, or, with equal validity and identical results, in terms of a quantity which characterized the energy distribution among the particles in a system.
www.unidata.ucar.edu /staff/blynds/tmp.html   (4839 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.