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Topic: Termination shock


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Termination shock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In space physics, the termination shock is the boundary marking one of the outer limits of the sun's influence.
The termination shock is believed to be 75-90 astronomical units[1] from the Sun.
The termination shock boundary fluctuates in its distance from the sun as a result of fluctuations in solar flare activity, i.e.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Termination_shock   (517 words)

  
 The termination shock   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
At the lowest level of complexity the termination shock is expected to be a fast mode MHD shock which is attempting to propagate Sunwards against the solar wind flow.
In common with other fast mode shocks, a foreshock region is expected upstream, populated by convected solar wind plasma and charged particles reflected and accelerated at the shock (and in the foreshock by Fermi acceleration processes) and by particles leaking from the heliosheath [Macek et al., 1991].
The termination shock is believed responsible for the acceleration of the so-called ``anomalous'' cosmic rays.
www.physics.usyd.edu.au /~cairns/teaching/lecture20/node5.html   (301 words)

  
 Introduction
Shock geometry and inverse Compton emission from the wind of a binary pulsar
Ball and Kirk [2000a] considered the effects of inverse Compton scattering by the unshocked pulsar wind, upstream of the termination shock.
The calculation of the geometry of the termination shock is outlined in §2.
www.atnf.csiro.au /pasa/18_1/ball/paper/node1.html   (635 words)

  
 NASA - Voyager Enters Solar System's Final Frontier
The bow shock in front of the moving heliosphere is similar to the one observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.
The termination shock is where the solar wind, a thin stream of electrically charged gas blowing continuously outward from the Sun, is slowed by pressure from gas between the stars.
The strongest evidence that Voyager 1 has passed through the termination shock into the slower, denser wind beyond is its measurement of an increase in the strength of the magnetic field carried by the solar wind and the inferred decrease in its speed.
www.nasa.gov /vision/universe/solarsystem/voyager_agu.html   (891 words)

  
 Next Stop, Interstellar Space: Science News Online, Jan. 3, 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The solar system's outer boundary, which lies beyond the termination shock, is the edge of the heliosphere, the vast bubble of space filled by the wind of charged particles continuously blown by the sun.
The termination shock (purple) marks the region where the solar wind is slowed abruptly by pressure from gas between the stars.
He notes that the termination shock is the closest known analog to the supernova shock wave generated when material hurled from an exploded star rams into the low-density region of space surrounding it.
www.sciencenews.org /20040103/bob8.asp   (1926 words)

  
 termination shock
The shock front, also known as the terminal shock, that surrounds the Sun at an estimated distance of 80 to 100 astronomical units.
It marks the transition where the solar wind slows from supersonic to subsonic speed, and where there are large changes in the orientation of the Sun's magnetic field and the direction of flow of charged particles.
Beyond the termination shock lies the edge of the solar magnetosphere known as the magnetosheath.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/T/termination_shock.html   (257 words)

  
 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) 2006  News Release
McComas and Schwadron say that understanding the role of the termination shock’s shape in the energization of anomalous cosmic rays may be a stepping stone to understanding the influence of shock shapes for energization of particle radiation throughout the cosmos.
Shocks energize many forms of this dangerous particle radiation, which pose significant hazards to astronauts on space missions, such as future manned missions to the Moon and Mars.
The shape of the termination shock wasn’t thought to be important, so most researchers treated it as being circular, with the magnetic field from the solar wind spiraling out and piercing through it at a single point.
www.swri.org /9what/releases/2006/Cosmic.htm   (1084 words)

  
 The Heliosphere
It is likely that the termination shock will consequently move inward and outward over the solar cycle by many AU, and by a few AU over times as short as one month.
The distances to the termination shock and to the heliopause are not known.
Inside the heliopause, the solar wind passes through a termination shock that is elongated in the downstream direction and which is moving back and forth at speeds up to 100 km/s.
web.mit.edu /space/www/voyager/voyager_science/helio.review/axford.suess.html   (2942 words)

  
 Voyager approaching solar system's final frontier
The termination shock is where the solar wind, a thin stream of electrically charged gas blown constantly from the Sun, is slowed abruptly by pressure from gas between the stars.
Estimating the location of the termination shock is hard because we don't know the precise conditions in interstellar space, and even what we do know, the speed and pressure of the solar wind, changes which causes the termination shock to expand, contract, and ripple.
Evidence against entry into the shock includes the observation that while there was a dramatic increase in low-speed particles, they weren't seen at the somewhat higher speeds scientists believe the termination shock generates.
www.physlink.com /news/110503Voyager1.cfm   (1495 words)

  
 NASA's Solar System Exploration: News & Events: 05.24.05: Voyager Spacecraft Enters Solar System's Final Frontier
At the termination shock, the solar wind slows abruptly from a speed that ranges from 700,000 to 1.5 million mph and becomes denser and hotter.
Predicting the location of the termination shock was hard, because the precise conditions in interstellar space are unknown.
The most persuasive evidence that Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock is its measurement of a sudden increase in the strength of the magnetic field carried by the solar wind, combined with an inferred decrease in its speed.
solarsystem.nasa.gov /news/display.cfm?News_ID=11015   (536 words)

  
 Newswise
The termination shock marks the beginning of a transition region at the edge of the solar system that is known as the heliosheath.
"The termination shock -- a shock wave in the solar wind, that marks the slowing of the supersonic solar wind to subsonic speed -- had been universally thought to be a prodigious accelerator of particles and our findings largely confirm that," said Hill, a research scientist in the department of physics.
The beginning of the heliosheath region is marked by the termination shock, the point at which the solar wind abruptly slows.
www.newswise.com /articles/view/514822?sc=swtr   (1140 words)

  
 NMSU astronomer tracks Voyager's encounter with edge of solar system
The termination shock is the point at which the solar wind -- streams of electrically charged gas blown from the sun -- collides with the interstellar medium that fills the vast areas of space between stars, creating a shock wave effect.
Because the shock boundary expands and contracts, it is possible that the spacecraft passed through the shock only to have the shock pass over and move beyond the spacecraft, Webber said.
Being able to take direct measurements from the termination shock, and then to study interstellar medium beyond the boundary, “is like the discovery of a new world, like landing on a new planet,” Webber said.
www.nmsu.edu /~ucomm/Releases/2003/November/Voyager_Webber.html   (660 words)

  
 The Distance to the Solar Wind Termination Shock in 1993 and 1994 from Observations of Anomalous Cosmic Rays
This is consistent with a non-equilibrium period caused by effects on the drift of the particles from the changing magnetic field topology (Figure 2e) and effects of the 1991 GMIR on the strength of the termination shock.
is the diffusion coefficient in the vicinity of the shock, and
The shock spectra of ACR He and O in Figures 4a and 4b are the spectra expected at the shock in the heliographic equator for the period 1994/157-209.
www.srl.caltech.edu /personnel/ace/recentpub/JGR_96/pap_preprint.html   (4919 words)

  
 Voyager Spacecraft Approaches Edge of Solar System
The termination shock occurs when the solar wind -- a thin stream of electrically charged gas blowing continuously outward from the Sun -- is slowed by pressure from gas between the stars.
At the termination shock, the solar wind slows abruptly from a speed ranging from 1.1 million kilometers to 2.4 million kilometers per hour and becomes denser and hotter.
At the termination shock, the solar wind slows abruptly from a speed that ranges from 700,000 to 1.5 million miles per hour and becomes denser and hotter.
usinfo.state.gov /xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2005&m=May&x=20050525144312lcnirellep0.690365&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html   (1059 words)

  
 Shock geometry
The winds of the pulsar and its companion star will generally be separated by a pair of termination shocks separated by a contact discontinuity.
The shape of the shock is not affected by the orbital motion of the two stars.
Figure 2 shows the geometry of the termination shock and illustrates the parameters used to describe it.
www.atnf.csiro.au /pasa/18_1/ball/paper/node2.html   (797 words)

  
 Science -- Stone 293 (5527): 55
In this model, the interstellar wind is supersonic (7) and a bow shock forms upstream of the nose of the heliosphere, where the interstellar wind slows and is warmed to a still relatively cool 20,000 K. The heliopause separates the cool interstellar ions deflected around the heliosphere from the hot solar ions inside the heliosphere.
This results in a termination shock front, the location of which is a direct indication of the size of the heliosphere and the pressure of the local interstellar medium.
Differences in the backscattered ultraviolet intensities observed by Voyager (upwind) and Pioneer 10 [HN17] (downwind) in 1990 imply the existence of a termination shock between 70 and 105 AU (12).
ajdubre.tripod.com /Physics-2/EdgeInterstellarSpace/55.html   (3541 words)

  
 The Heliosphere
The Earth's bow shock forms about 13 Earth radii sunward of Earth--that is the closest point in a curved surface, similar to what you get when you rotate a hyperbola around its axis of symmetry.
Apparently the termination shock had been crossed, which was also signaled by an increase of the magnetic fluctuation level ("turbulence").
Somewhere beyond the termination shock lies the heliopause, the true interstellar boundary, and interesting things might be observed when it is reached.
www.phy6.org /Education/wtermin.html   (1329 words)

  
 Laputan Logic - Termination Shock
Bow Shock (as in the bow of a ship) is a visible barrier just beyond the the heliopause of this distant star.
The outer surface of this shell is known as the heliopause where the velocity of the solar wind drops to zero and this is technically what marks the edge of the solar system.
The inner surface of this shell is known as the termination shock where the solar wind velocity drops to below supersonic levels.
www.laputanlogic.com /articles/2005/05/25-1650-2524.html   (481 words)

  
 The termination shock near 35° latitude
The termination shock moves outwards and inwards over timescales of a solar cycle in response to the variations in the average solar wind speed.
Shock parameters are distinctly different when the shock moves outwards or inwards.
During the period of high-speed (low-speed) solar wind, the shock moves outward (inward) and the shock is weaker (stronger).
www.agu.org /pubs/crossref/2004/2003GL018679.shtml   (229 words)

  
 SPACE.com -- A Glowing Discovery at the Forefront of Our Plunge Through Space
After all, the shock wave -- called the "bow shock," like the ripple of water raised by a boat's bow as it moves through the water -- is the solar system's protective womb, and we'd like to know more about it.
A related inner shell of force, known as the termination shock, might be pushed as far inward as the orbit of Jupiter.
The termination shock is a region where the solar wind first feels the interstellar medium, dropping its speed from several hundred kilometers per second to less than half that.
space.com /scienceastronomy/solarsystem/heliosphere_shock_000315.html   (1118 words)

  
 UI's Gurnett Says Voyager 1 Reaches Milestone On Journey To Interstellar Space
Kurth compares the termination shock to what happens when water is allowed to run from a kitchen faucet onto the center of a dinner plate.
This rippled band of turbulence represents the termination shock and the region where it occurs, the heliosheath.
Today, he says that the termination shock just encountered is probably about three-quarters of the way there, placing interstellar space about 25 to 35 AU beyond Voyager's current position.
itsnt166.iowa.uiowa.edu /uns-archives/2005/may/052405voyager_milestone.html   (640 words)

  
 IBEX: Interstellar Boundary Explorer
Termination Shock: Where the solar wind transitions from a fast supersonic wind to a slower subsonic flow.
Heliopause: Separates the subsonic flow of solar wind (inner heliosheath) from the slowed, heated, and diverted interstellar flow (outer heliosheath).
Bow shock or wave: Separates undisturbed interstellar flow from the slowed heated and diverted interstellar flow.
www.ibex.swri.edu /mission/strategy.shtml   (219 words)

  
 Voyager 1 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
At 14 billion kilometers (95 astronomical units or 8.8 billion miles) from the Sun, Voyager 1 has entered the heliosheath, a region beyond termination shock the heliosheath is the shocked region between the solar system and interstellar space.
If Voyager 1 is still functioning when it finally passes the heliopause, scientists will get their first direct measurements of the conditions in the interstellar medium.
In a scientific session at the American Geophysical Union meeting in New Orleans on the morning of March 25, 2005, Dr. Ed Stone presented clear evidence that Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock in December 2004 "SH22A-01".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Voyager_1   (1341 words)

  
 Voyager Approaching Solar System's Final Frontier - collectSPACE: Messages
It is approaching, and may have temporarily entered, the region beyond termination shock.
The termination shock is where the solar wind, a thin stream of electrically charged gas blown constantly from the sun, is slowed by pressure from gas between the stars.
At the termination shock, the solar wind slows abruptly from its average speed of 700,000 to 1,500,000 mph.
www.collectspace.com /ubb/Forum23/HTML/000795.html   (774 words)

  
 SPACE.com -- Voyager to Reach Distant Milestones Sooner Than You Think   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Voyager 2 is heading toward the left side of the termination shock (as represented in this diagram).
The termination shock, nearly 4 billion miles inside the heliopause, is where the solar wind first starts to slow down and reverse due to its first encounters with pressure from interstellar space.
This is a fortuitous for Voyager as it cruises toward the termination shock.
www.space.com /missionlaunches/missions/heliosphere_shock_010706.html   (973 words)

  
 Energy Citations Database (ECD) - Energy and Energy-Related Bibliographic Citations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The locations of the termination shock and the heliopause are restudied by taking into account the effects of pickup protons.
After its penetration through the termination shock, the GMIR shock continued to propagate in the subsonic region of the solar wind and eventually interacted with the heliopause.
This interaction produced a transmitted shock propagating outward in the interstellar medium and a reflected shock propagating inward toward the Sun in the subsonic solar wind.
www.osti.gov /energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=175822   (446 words)

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