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Topic: Tetanus


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In the News (Thu 19 Oct 17)

  
  Tetanus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tetanus is a serious and often fatal disease caused by the neurotoxin tetanospasmin which is produced by the Gram-positive, obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani.
Tetanus was first documented by Hippocrates, and records dating back to the 5th century BCE document countless distinctive clinical observations of the disease.
The first sign of tetanus is a mild jaw muscle spasm called lockjaw (trismus), followed by stiffness of the neck and back, risus sardonicus, difficulty swallowing, and muscle rigidity in the abdomen.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tetanus   (865 words)

  
 The Power of 10
Tetanus bacteria are present worldwide and are commonly found in soil, dust and manure.
Common first signs of tetanus are a headache and muscular stiffness in the jaw (lockjaw) followed by stiffness of the neck, difficulty in swallowing, rigidity of abdominal muscles, spasms, sweating and fever.
Tetanus is caused by a toxin produced by a type of bacteria found worldwide in soil, dust and manure.
www.nfid.org /powerof10/section2/factsheet-tetanus.html   (515 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus spores are found throughout the environment, usually in soil, dust, and animal waste.
Tetanus is caused by a toxin (poison) produced by spores of the bacterium Clostridium tetani.
Tetanus is a major problem in developing countries where immunization of children is not required or enforced.
www.astdhpphe.org /infect/tetanus.html   (674 words)

  
 Tetanus- Health Encyclopedia and Reference
Tetanus is preventable by immunization or through administration of tetanus immune globulin.
Patients with tetanus are hospitalized in an intensive care unit until it is clear that the progression of the disease has stabilized at a level that does not interfere with vital functions, and that therapy can be managed outside the unit.
Tetanus toxoid is available by itself, or frequently as one of three components in a vaccine.
drdean.healthcentral.com /encyclopedia/408/291/Tetanus.html   (871 words)

  
 Tetanus Info - Encyclopedia WikiWhat.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
tetanus can be found in soil (especially agricultural soil), and the intestines and feces of horses, sheep, cattle, rats, dogs, cats, guinea pigs, and chickens.
The incubation period for tetanus is 3-21 days (with the average being about 8 days).
Typical signs of tetanus include an increase in body temperature by 2-4° celsius, diaphoresis (excessive sweating), an elevated blood pressure, and an episodic rapid heart rate.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/t/te/tetanus.html   (460 words)

  
 Communicable Disease Fact Sheet
The tetanus germ is present throughout the environment and is commonly found in soil contaminated with manure.
A common first sign of tetanus is muscular stiffness in the jaw (lockjaw), followed by stiffness of the neck, difficulty in swallowing, rigidity of abdominal muscles, spasms, sweating and fever.
Tetanus toxoid in combination with diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) is given at two, four, six and 12-15 months of age, and between four and six years of age.
www.health.state.ny.us /nysdoh/communicable_diseases/en/tetanus.htm   (420 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus, sometimes called lock-jaw, is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxic exotoxin of the acteria, Clostridium tetani.
Tetanus, sometimes called lock-jaw, is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxic exotoxin of the bacteria, Clostridium tetani.
Of the few cases of tetanus reported in Australia each year, approximately 80 per cent are in persons over the age of 50 and 60 per cent are female.
www.health.gov.au /pubhlth/strateg/communic/factsheets/tetanus.htm   (495 words)

  
 CDC - Yellow Book: [4] Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis - CDC Travelers' Health
Tetanus, an acute disease caused by Clostridium tetani, is characterized by muscle rigidity and painful spasms, often starting in the muscles of the jaw and neck.
The clinical course of generalized tetanus is variable and depends on the degree of prior immunity, the amount of toxin present, and the age and general health of the patient.
Tetanus is a medical emergency requiring hospitalization, immediate treatment with tetanus immune globulin (human TIG, or equine antitoxin if human immune globulin is not available) a tetanus toxoid booster, agents to control muscle spasm, and, if indicated, aggressive wound care and antibiotics.
www2.ncid.cdc.gov /travel/yb/utils/ybGet.asp?section=dis&obj=dtp.htm   (2376 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus, although a very serious illness with a high mortality rate, is preventable by current and active immunization.
Tetanospasmin is responsible for the uncontrolled spasms and exaggerated reflexes diagnostic of the tetanus illness.
Tetanus boosters are available for those in need, but boosters given too frequently can cause severe local pain and swelling, as well as an Arthus reaction.
www.dentalcare1.com /docs/soap/conteduc/ulcase1/tetanus.htm   (226 words)

  
 Tetanus
Tetanus is caused by a bacterium most often found in the soil, but spores can also be found in the faeces of domestic animals.
Tetanus is usually contracted through minor wounds and burns, most frequently during the summer months or in warm climates.
In the UK tetanus vaccination is part of the routine immunisation programme and is given in a combined vaccine with diphtheria as a primary dose and reinforced for the purpose of travel.
www.travelhealth.co.uk /diseases/tetanus.htm   (205 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus is a rare but often fatal disease that affects the central nervous system by causing painful muscular contractions.
Tetanus is rare in the United States, with nearly all cases occurring in adults who were not vaccinated as children.
In the underdeveloped world, neonatal tetanus accounts for about one-half of tetanus deaths and is related to infection of the umbilical stump in a baby born of an unimmunized mother.
www.lifesteps.com /gm/Atoz/ency/tetanus.jsp   (1589 words)

  
 Neonatal Tetanus
Tetanus toxoid is used in three ways : · as a triple antigen with diphtheria toxoid and pertussis vaccine (adsorbed DTP) to provide basic immunity against tetanus to infants (three doses at 6,10 and 14 weeks), · as a double antigen DT to children up to 6 years.
Tetanus transmission can be prevented during childbirth by improving immunization services, especially for pregnant women, promoting clean delivery services and cord care practices, and strengthening disease reporting and case investigation systems.
Neonatal tetanus continues to be seriously underreported, since populations at highest risk for neonatal tetanus tend to live in rural areas and have poorest access to health care and birth registration.
www.who.int /vaccines/en/neotetanus.shtml   (1888 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus is a rare but serious disease of the central nervous system.
Tetanus is caused by a bacterium, which lives in soil and manure.
As tetanus affects the muscles in the jaw it can cause breathing difficulties, which if not treated can lead to suffocation and death.
www.homehealth-uk.com /medical/tetanus.htm   (342 words)

  
 Tetanus
Tetanus often begins with muscle spasms in the jaw (called trismus), accompanied by difficulty swallowing and stiffness or pain in the muscles of the neck, shoulders, or back.
For children, tetanus immunization is part of the DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis) vaccinations.
Neonatal tetanus can be prevented by making sure that all pregnant women have had their tetanus immunizations and by delivering babies in sanitary conditions.
kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/tetanus.html   (977 words)

  
 Tetanus
Tetanus is characterized by strong and very painful contractions of muscles, particularly of the jaw and neck, earning it the common nickname of "lockjaw." It also leads to severe muscle spasms throughout the body.
Tetanus is caused by a powerful nerve toxin (or poison) produced by the bacterium Clostridium tetani, which can be found anywhere there is soil and manure--in other words, just about everywhere.
Tetanus is contracted from the introduction of soil or manure directly into breaks in the skin (even tiny ones).
www.drspock.com /article/0,1510,6130,00.html   (829 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Tetanus
Tetanus, serious infectious disease of the nervous system, in which a bacterial toxin causes severe muscle spasm.
Although about 60 percent of all cases are fatal, active immunization with tetanus toxoid before an injury, with periodic reimmunization, or so-called booster injections, is extremely effective; tetanus rarely occurs in people so immunized.
A series of three injections is recommended if the tetanus toxoid is combined with both diphtheria and toxoid pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine in the commonly administered DTP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) injections.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761556482/Tetanus.html   (379 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Tetanus
Tetanus is a disease caused by the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium tetani that affects the central nervous system, sometimes resulting in death.
Tetanus often begins with mild spasms in the jaw muscles (trismus), neck muscles, and facial muscles.
Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you have never been immunized against tetanus as an adult or child, if your children have not been immunized, or if you are unsure of your tetanus immunization (vaccine) status.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/000615.htm   (1063 words)

  
 Adults Need Tetanus Shots, Too
Though tetanus bacteria are found everywhere in the environment--in soil, street dust, and in animal intestines and feces--natural immunity to the disease is rare.
Cephalic tetanus, a rare form of the disease, is associated with chronic ear infections, in which tetanus bacteria are present in the inner ear.
Tetanus in newborns has emerged worldwide as the predominant form of tetanus, as the baby's umbilical stump is often sealed with mud or clay or other contaminated substances.
www.fda.gov /fdac/features/696_tet.html   (2237 words)

  
 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 13, Ch. 157, Bacterial Diseases
Tetanus is a preventable disease of great significance, particularly the neonatal form in developing countries.
The manifestations of tetanus are caused by an exotoxin (tetanospasmin) elaborated by C.
Tetanus has a worldwide mortality rate of 50%; mortality is highest in young and old patients and in drug abusers.
www.merck.com /pubs/mmanual/section13/chapter157/157e.htm   (5115 words)

  
 Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus germs are found everywhere, usually in soil, dust, and manure.
The first signs of tetanus infection are usually a headache and spasms of the jaw muscles.
Tetanus vaccine is usually given together with diphtheria and pertussis vaccines in a shot called DTaP.
www.ecbt.org /tetanus.htm   (192 words)

  
 Tetanus
Tetanus is caused by a type of bacteria called Clostridium tetani that usually live in soil.
Tetanus often begins with muscle spasms in the jaw and face, together with difficulty swallowing and stiffness or pain in muscles in the neck, shoulder, or back.
Neonatal tetanus can be prevented by making sure that all pregnant women have proper immunization before delivery and by delivering their babies in sanitary conditions.
kidshealth.org /teen/infections/bacterial_viral/tetanus.html   (825 words)

  
 NaTHNaC - Health Professionals, Travel Health Information Sheets, Tetanus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Tetanus occurs worldwide and tetanus spores are present in soil and the dung of a number of animals.
Tetanus is an uncommon disease in many resource-rich countries of the western hemisphere; the WHO Western Pacific and European regions have largely controlled clinical tetanus through universal vaccination.
Tetanus spores are present in the intestine and dung of horses, sheep, cattle, dogs, cats, rats, guinea pigs and chickens, and are passed into soil via faeces, making them ubiquitous in the environment.
www.nathnac.org /pro/factsheets/tetanus.htm   (1298 words)

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