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Topic: Thames Barrier


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Thames Barrier
The Thames Barrier was designed to protect the capital from flooding until at least the year 2030.
The Barrier was inaugurated by The Queen in 1984 and spans 520 meters across the Thames at Woolwich Reach.
Half a million tons of concrete were used in the coffer dams inside which the piers were built and in the sills on which the gates rest on the river bed when not in service.
www.corrosion-doctors.org /Landmarks/Thames.htm   (405 words)

  
 Thames Barrier Information
The Thames Barrier is a flood control structure on the River Thames at Woolwich Reach in London.
When containerization came in and a new port was opened at Tilbury, a smaller barrier became feasible with each of the four main navigation spans being the same width as the span of Tower Bridge.
The barrier was operated by the National Rivers Authority until April 1996 when it passed to the Environment Agency.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Thames_Barrier   (567 words)

  
 River Thames and boaty things   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Environment Agency is closing the Thames Barrier today at 12 noon to protect London from high spring tides and tidal surges in the Thames estuary.
It highlights just how necessary the Thames Barrier is to help reduce the risk of flooding in London and it serves as a reminder to us all that living in the flood plain is never without risk.
Rowers on the Thames are set to benefit from a unique new code of conduct for safe rowing on the tidal river, launched jointly by the Port of London Authority (PLA) and the Thames Regional Rowing Council (TRRC).
www.the-river-thames.co.uk /news06.htm   (4042 words)

  
 Guardian | Outer barrier for Thames floated in river defence plan
However, Sarah Lavery, the project manager for Thames 2100, believes that for the next 100 years modifications and extensions to the existing Thames barrier will be enough to save London.
Thames 2100 is a review of how to prevent the homes and businesses of 1.2 million people from being flooded as sea levels rise this century.
Modifications to the existing barrier would cost upwards of £2m, but the cost of an outer barrier would be £20bn.
www.guardian.co.uk /print/0,,5100291-103690,00.html   (482 words)

  
 Flood the Facts :: Flood London
Added to this sum was the expense of five minor barriers in the lower Estuary and a further £300 million for the raising and strengthening of over 70 miles of banks and defences downstream.
Barrier plans had been shelved often enough before and the GLC was determined that this time some form of protection would be built.
In the Barrier design, a global-mean sea level rise of 0.22 metres was incorporated in the figure of 0.4 metres for increase in high water in central London over fifty years.
www.floodlondon.com /floodtb.htm   (1899 words)

  
 Cleveland Bridge - Thames Barrier
The barrier was completed in 1982, the contract value was £92 million, this was carried out on behalf of Greater London Council, Department of Public Health Engineering.
The barrier was built to prevent surge flooding in London, it spans 520 metres (a third of a mile) across the Thames and it is the world's largest movable flood barrier.
The barrier comprises of four 61 metre and two 31 metre rising sectors and four 31 metre falling radial gates with operating machinery.
www.clevelandbridge.com /thames.html   (259 words)

  
 Thames Barrier, London SW18: tourist information from TourUK   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Thames Barrier, built to prevent the possibility of catastrophic flooding in London, was one of the greatest construction achievements of the 20th century.
The gates rise 6 feet above that the level reached by the tidal surge of 1953, and the raised barrier seals part of the upper Thames from the sea, with a steel wall facing downstream to stem the tide.
The barrier is 1,706 feet from bank to bank, with four main openings having a span of 200 feet.
www.touruk.co.uk /london_sights/thamesbarrier1.htm   (395 words)

  
 The River Thames Guide - About The Thames: Thames Bridges, Events, Locks, Information, History & Canals
The River Thames is famous throughout the World for its history, its culture, and its amazing variety of wildlife, archaeology, and scenery.
It rises in four headstreams the Isis (or Windrush), the Churn, the Coln, and the Leach on the south-eastern slope of the Cotswold Hills, in Gloucestershire, near Cheltenham.
In January that year, the first inland emergency lifeboat service in England was launched along the Thames in London, with stations at Chiswick Pier, Gravesend, Teddington, and Tower Pier, and with headquarters at the Thames Barrier.
www.riverthames.co.uk /about.htm   (890 words)

  
 The Thames Barrier - Trades, industries and institutions - Port Cities
The Thames Barrier is a unique structure built to protect London against flooding caused by tidal surges from the North Sea.
The Thames and the Lea burst their banks and damaged more than 1100 houses in Silvertown and Canning Town, but the floods did not reach central London. ; Although London escaped disaster in 1953, the floods showed just how vulnerable the city could be.
The width of the Barrier from bank to bank is about 520 metres (a third of a mile) with the four main openings each having a clear span of 61 metres (200 feet).
www.portcities.org.uk /london/server/show/ConFactFile.85/The-Thames-Barrier.html   (629 words)

  
 "The Development of the Thames Barrier" by Geoff Miller-Richards
Inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II in 1984, the Thames Barrier is the city’s most important insurance against surging tides and crippling floods.
The barrier was designed by the Consulting organisation Rendel, Palmer and Tritton for the GLC, our speaker was part of the initial evaluation and design team, the concept of the rotating gates was devised by Charles Draper's innovative design which uses radial gates on sills developed from the gas tap principle.
The Thames Barrier comprises 10 separate movable floodgates, positioned end-to-end across the 520-metre span of the Thames at Woolwich Reach, east of London.
www.ewell-probus.org.uk /archive/thames_barrier.htm   (1863 words)

  
 River Thames - Thames Barrier
The Thames Barrier is a flood defence mechanism that protects London from tidal floods.
The barrier was originally planned in 1972 to protect London from floods, and was opened in 1984.
The barrier is built across a 520 metre wide stretch of the river and divides the river into six navigable and four smaller non-navigable channels between nine large concrete piers.
www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk /riverthames/barrier.htm   (133 words)

  
 The Thames Path - The Thames Barrier to Greenwich
The Thames Path - The Thames Barrier to Greenwich
The nearest town to the Thames Barrier is Charlton, in South East London.
Charlton Station is around 3/4 of a mile from the Thames Barrier, and has frequent trains, operated by South Eastern, from central London (Charing Cross, Waterloo East, London Bridge and Cannon Street), Dartford and the Medway towns in Kent.
www.thames-path.org.uk /thames_barrier_greenwich.html   (1505 words)

  
 Thames Barrier Visitor Center review on A London Guide
Like many major cities around the world London was established along a major river, with the world's oceans on the rise safe guards against flooding are a necessity, the Thames Barrier is one such precaution.
It is the world's largest moveable flood barrier and cost £480 million to construct, all ten gates are tested each month for two hours with a full day closure in the autumn.
This exhibition which includes a working model of the Barrier explains the natural forces that caused the Barrier to be built.
www.alondonguide.com /thamesbarrier.html   (122 words)

  
 Ramblers Association - Information - Path - Thames Path
A path along the Thames was among the original list of long distance routes proposed by the Hobhouse Committee in 1948 and was subsequently keenly supported by the Ramblers' Association, who published David Sharp's first guide to the route in 1981.
Thames Head is a short walk from Kemble station, with rail services to London, Reading, Swindon, Cheltenham and Gloucester and connections for Bristol, south Wales and many other parts of the country.
The Thames Barrier is a short walk from Charlton station, with Connex trains to Greenwich, London Bridge, Charing Cross, Cannon Street, Dartford and the Medway Towns, with connections for other parts of Kent.
www.ramblers.org.uk /info/paths/thames.html   (1819 words)

  
 BlurtIt: What is the Thames Barrier?
The Thames Barrier was completed in 1982 at a cost of £535 million in an effort to protect London from surge tides.
The catalyst for the building of the Barrier was the great flood of 1953, in which 300 people drowned.
The Thames Barrier is the world's largest mobile flood barrier.
www.blurtit.com /q356142.html   (196 words)

  
 Greenwich Guide - The Thames Barrier
The Thames Barrier has been described as the eighth wonder of the world.
In addition, eleven and a half miles of the river to the east of the barrier were protected by new walls, to a new defence level of 23 feet (7 metres).
Nearby is the Thames Barrier Visitor Centre, where a multimedia presentation gives details of the flood control problems, and shows how the barrier was designed and constructed.
www.greenwich-guide.org.uk /barrier.htm   (521 words)

  
 ThamesWeb
Andrew Batchelor, Thames Barrier manager said: "We have been carefully monitoring weather conditions and tidal levels and have decided to close the Thames Barrier to protect London from the anticipated high tide coming up the Thames Estuary.
The Thames Barrier is one of the largest moveable flood barriers in the world, and, together with its associated defences, protects 125 square km of central London - and the 1.25 million people who live and work in the floodplain.
The Thames Estuary 2100 project is the first step of this process and will help shape the way in which flood defence schemes are designed and managed.
www.thamesweb.com /news_story.php?news_id=144   (519 words)

  
 edie news centre - Thumbs up for Thames Barrier
The Thames Barrier has been given a clean bill of health, despite having been immersed in the river for the past 21 years.
Using robots, 3-D infra-red imaging, electro-magnetic and ultra-sound measuring equipment, the tests showed that the protective paint coating on the gates was still in very good condition, and that there had been little wear or tear on key components of the structure.
The results of the survey will inform the Agency's Thames Estuary 2100 project which aims to ensure the continued performance of the Thames Barrier for the next 100 years.
www.edie.net /news/news_story.asp?id=10949&channel=0   (313 words)

  
 TET: About The River: Sustainable Development: What are the major environmental issues for the Thames in London?
The proposal is that the barrier would be open around the time of high water to let the tide go in and out for a few hours.
London is protected from the Thames flooding by the Thames Barrier and by an unbroken line of flood defence that stretches alongside the river from Teddington down to the Barrier and beyond.
The Thames Barrier was finished in 1982 and opened in 1984 to protect London from the threat of flooding from the sea.
www.thames-explorer.org.uk /about_the_river/environmental_issues.html   (4511 words)

  
 About Thames Luxury Charters
thames cruises thames boat boat charter boat hire river thames cruise boat trips on the thames dinner cruises thames boat parties thames cruises thames boat boat charter boat hire river thames cruise
Nigel has been the largest organiser of Thames river parties for over 30 years and is frequently credited with being the originator of the concept of shared parties for groups back in 1967.
The Directors at the outset recognised the requirements of organisers to have the option for their guests to have access to fresh air as well as the security of being completely enclosed.
www.thamesluxurycharters.co.uk /about/history.html   (282 words)

  
 Thames Barrier, England. Travel guide & tourist information by Hostelbookers.com
A flood barrier had been advocated as far back as the 1850s, but it wasn't until global warming and rising tides, coupled with the fact that southeast England is sinking slowly into the sea, that the Greater London Council finally agreed to build the present barrier.
The Thames Barrier Information Centre (daily: April–Sept 10.30am–4.30pm; Oct–March 11am–3.30pm; £1; tel 020/8305 4188, www.environment-agency.gov.uk), on Unity Way, is run by the Environment Agency, and has glossy models, macho videos and explains the basic mechanism of the barrier (something which is by no means obvious from above the water).
By far the most interesting way to see the Thames Barrier, however, is from the terraced café on the one day a month when it is raised for tests (phone for dates and times).
www.hostelbookers.com /guides/england/thames_barrier   (281 words)

  
 Flood fear forces Thames Barrier rethink-News-UK-TimesOnline   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
THE Government plans to increase the height of the Thames Barrier, and is even considering building a new one, as a result of the increased threat of flooding because of global warming.
Agency officials have become alarmed that the barrier may not last as long as predicted when it was commissioned in 1982 because the risk of flooding appears to be increasing faster than expected.
The barrier, which cost £350 million, was built to prevent a repetition of the floods of 50 years ago today, which claimed 300 lives and made 320,000 people homeless, making it Britain’s worst peacetime disaster.
www.timesonline.co.uk /tol/news/uk/article859254.ece   (785 words)

  
 The Thames Path National Trail
The Thames Path once again briefly leaves the river to pass through the lovely village of Shillingford, returning to the Thames just out of the village, and continuing to the edge of Dorchester.
The Thames is not navigable after a few miles west of Lechlade and so this is the first walk where the path does not follow the banks of the river for much of the time.
The final part of the Thames Path is from the town of Cricklade, to the source of the Thames, near Cirencester.
www.thames-path.org.uk /index.html   (1639 words)

  
 Thames Barrier Park - : London Development Agency   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
On the north bank of the Thames and with stunning views of the awesome flood Barrier lies a jewel in the crown of London's parks.
An excellent children's play area, 5 a side football/basketball court, great places to picnic and play, the Thames path, with magnificent views of the barrier, and a fountain plaza where 32 jets spring from the ground to provide a cooling and entertaining delight for children to splash and play.
Thames Barrier Park is accessible to those with disabilities.
www.thamesbarrierpark.org.uk   (315 words)

  
 Thames Barrier photos and pictures
This Thames Barrier image is part of the royalty free photos and pictures of London.
High resolution 300dpi Thames Barrier pictures and photos of can be used in some cases up to A3, nearly all pictures and photos can be reproduced up to A4.
All royalty free Thames Barrier photos and pictures have had a degree of sharpening added and are suitable for most publishing.
www.royalty-free-pictures.com /product.php/877/8   (253 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | England | London | 10-mile Thames flood barrier plan
Climate change experts say the existing Thames barrier, built in the 1970s, may not be able to cope with rising tides.
Scientists for the Thames Estuary 2100 project, set up by the Environment Agency to assess flood risk and river management over the next century, say the barrier would be an option if sea levels started rising faster than expected.
Under the new scheme, the barrier would contain numerous gates to allow water to flow in and out of the Thames estuary according to the tides.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/england/london/4162905.stm   (295 words)

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