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Topic: The Age of Spiritual Machines


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  The Age of Spiritual Machines - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Age Of Spiritual Machines is a book by futurist Ray Kurzweil about the future course of humanity, particularly relating to the development of artificial intelligence and its impact on human consciousness.
Originally published in 1999, the book predicts that machines with human-like intelligence will be available from affordable computing devices within a couple of decades, revolutionising most aspects of life, and that eventually humanity and its machinery will become one and the same.
In early 2000, Mike Turner, founding member and guitarist of the Canadian band Our Lady Peace, had stumbled upon the book at a bookstore, and though he was initially attracted by the shininess of the book, he bought the book intrigued by the concepts that the book contained.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/The_Age_of_Spiritual_Machines   (365 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines
If Ray Kurzweil, author of The Age of Spiritual Machines, is right, in a few years you may be able to commiserate with the very person who understands you best: you (albeit in a silicon-based life form).
Machines, derived from human thinking and surpassing humans in their capacity for experience, will claim to be conscious, and thus be spiritual.
His review was inspired by discussions of The Age of Spiritual Machines among members of the Ethics Center’s technology reading group, which brings faculty and staff together to discuss the moral implications of technological advances.
www.scu.edu /ethics/publications/iie/v11n1/spiritualmachine.html   (809 words)

  
 Review: The Age of Spiritual Machines
Ray Kurzweil's The Age of Spiritual Machines is an intriguing and engaging mixture of science and entertainment, along with a healthy dose of futurism.
The idea of machine and human spirituality plays a role later in the book, but this is essentially a work about evolution in all senses of the word.
The remainder of The Age of Spiritual Machines is in essence a history of the next hundred years written in advance, by a man that is able to include a detailed list of past (very accurate) predictions.
www.cs.gordon.edu /local/courses/cs403/currentReviews/rotondo.html   (1022 words)

  
 The Very Best Books : The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence
If a machine has as much processing power as a human, can do all a human can, its spiritual status is something like that of a human.
While this may be a basis for an argument that machines could be considered intelligent, it says nothing on the possibility of machine consciousness or spirituality.
He was the principal developer of the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.
www.elise.com /store/Reviews/ItemId/0140282025/ReviewPage/4   (1283 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines
A machine is as distinctively and brilliantly and expressively human as a violin sonata or a theorem in Euclid.
As machines moved beyond mere implements to extend human reach and strength, they also began to accumulate the ability to remember and perform logical manipulations.
In the accompanying figure, "The Exponential Growth of Computing, 1900-1998," I plotted forty-nine notable computing machines spanning the twentieth century on an exponential chart, in which the vertical axis represents powers of ten in computer speed per unit cost (as measured in the number of "calculations per second" that can be purchased for $1,000).
partners.nytimes.com /books/first/k/kurzweil-machines.html   (10325 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines: A Review
"Spirituality," likewise, is weakly represented in the text, being referred to less than a dozen times (with an additional half-a-dozen that the Index did not pick up on), only one approaching anything like extended discussion (pp.
But then neither does any other element of spirituality appear here, either; it is a Timeline devoted to non-spiritual tools and technology, a curious phenomenon in a book with this daring title.
We live in an age of unbelief, of mathematical explanation, which comes to the edge of the Great Sea of the mystic, and stops there, uncertain and basically helpless.
english.ttu.edu /KAIROS/5.1/reviews/mclaughlin   (461 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines samples from Ray Kurzweil's
In turn, machines to card and comb the wool to feed the new mechanized spinning machines were developed in the 1780s.
With these new machines, humans could manipulate objects for which our muscles alone were inadequate and carry out tasks at the previously unattainable speeds.
While the social and economic impact of this new technology was controversial, the concept of machines being physically superior to ourselves was not.
www.beachbrowser.com /Archives/Science-and-Health/June-99/the-age-of-intelligent-machines.htm   (2769 words)

  
 ISCID - Are We Spiritual Machines? - Chat
On the one hand, one might argue that machines are less like humans than animals because at least animals are biological and have many similar organs and structures and behaviors.
Any deterministic complexity emerging in the course of machine assembly and operation is merely a function of distributed dynamical laws intersecting in specific arguments which remain spatially separate throughout (and thus causally independent in any spatial cross-section), despite being subject to identical localistic laws.
Consider that we will have machines that are as complex as humans and indeed based on a thorough reverse engineering of the principles of operation of humans.
www.iscid.org /arewespiritualmachines-chat.php   (5349 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Books: The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Are We Spiritual Machines?: Ray Kurzweil Vs. the Critics of Strong AI by Ray Kurzweil (Contributor), et al
Spiritual Machines is filled with interesting insights on how we think and how our brains work, and his discussions on emerging technologies strike the right balance between technical detail and general readability.
Kurzweil predicts that within 100 years that machines themselves will claim to be human, that humans will universally use neural implant technology that will allow them to immediately understand information, and that those humans that don't use this technology will be unable to meaningfully participate in dialogues with those who do.
www.amazon.ca /exec/obidos/ASIN/0670882178   (1486 words)

  
 Wired 8.04: Why the future doesn't need us.
The machines might be permitted to make all of their own decisions without human oversight, or else human control over the machines might be retained.
If the machines are permitted to make all their own decisions, we can't make any conjectures as to the results, because it is impossible to guess how such machines might behave.
In that case the average man may have control over certain private machines of his own, such as his car or his personal computer, but control over large systems of machines will be in the hands of a tiny elite - just as it is today, but with two differences.
www.wired.com /wired/archive/8.04/joy.html   (1116 words)

  
 The age of Ray Kurzweil - The Boston Globe
In the reception area are a vintage Thomas Edison dictation machine and a large flat-screen monitor on which a computer program draws angular, cartoon-like portraits.
He is 57 years old, nearly the age at which his father died of a heart attack.
By then, in other words, aging and poverty may hardly exist and people may not retire or even work in a way that's recognizable to us.
www.boston.com /news/globe/ideas/articles/2005/09/25/the_age_of_ray_kurzweil   (2144 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines by Ray Kurzweil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
This excerpt, the prologue, is a bold outline for a revolution in the relationship between humanity and the tools we use.
Ultimately, the machines will gather knowledge on their own by venturing into the physical world, drawing from the full spectrum of media and information services, and sharing knowledge with each other (which machines can do far more easily than their human creators).
The combination of human-level intelligence in a machine with a computer's inherent superiority in the speed, accuracy, and sharing ability of its memory will be formidable.
www.robotbooks.com /spiritual_machines.htm   (2660 words)

  
 Camelot.ca - The Age of Spiritual Machines   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Imagine a world where the difference between man and machine blurs, where the line between humanity and technology fades, and where the soul and the silicon chip unite.
In The Age of Spiritual Machines, the brains behind the Kurzweil Reading Machine, the Kurzweil ; synthesizer, advanced speech recognition, and other technologies devises a framework for envisioning the next century.
In his inspired hands, life in the new millennium no longer seems daunting. Instead, Kurzweil's twenty-first century promises to be an age in which the marriage of human sensitivity and artificial intelligence fundamentally alters and improves the way we live.
www.camelot.ca /en/item/153406.html   (226 words)

  
 Spiritual   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
As the show closed, the rescued young woman nervously drew away from the handsome machine, and the bewildered machine pondered his new, non-human identity.
The supplanting of human intelligence with machine intelligence is inevitable.
Kurzweil uses that troubling word "spiritual" in his title, yet his scenario for 2099 AD is more temporal than supernatural.
cla.uconn.edu /reviews/Spiritual.html   (764 words)

  
 Zadok Perspectives Issue 63 - Review: The Age of Spiritual Machines
Only in one three-page section is 'spirituality' discussed, where we find that "spiritual machines" are simply ones which can think-or which other humans accept as thinking (the famous Turing Test).
Indeed, The Age of Intelligent Machines reads at many points as if human history only began in 1861 with Darwin's theory of evolution, and 'evolution' is sprinkled liberally all over Part One, in a bewildering range of meanings.
Despite large amounts of material about machines becoming embedded in us, and then taking on their own life, not a single word is said about human reproduction, the complementarity of the sexes (however regarded) and so on.
www.zadok.org.au /perspectives/issue63/reviews/theage6301.shtml   (1399 words)

  
 Barnes & Noble.com - The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence - Ray ...
The brains behind the Kurzweil Reading Machine (which helps Stevie Wonder read his mail), the Kurzweil synthesizer, and the voice-recognition program that appears on Windows 98, he is also a formidable thinker who a decade ago predicted the emergence of the World Wide Web and that a computer would beat the world chess champion.
The Age of Spiritual Machines is no list of predictions but a framework for envisioning the 21st century in which one advance or invention leads inexorably to another.
The Age of Spiritual Machines is his latest effort to explore the future of technology, a future he sees filled with machines as intelligent as their owners.
search.barnesandnoble.com /booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=Xz6pwS8Aab&isbn=0140282025&itm=1   (2535 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines: Timeline
The age of the Enlightenment ushers in a philosophical movement that restores the belief in the supremacy of human reason, knowledge, and freedom.
Neural-net machines are quite simple and incorporate a small number of neurons organized in only one or two layers.
Pocket-sized reading machines for the blind and visually impaired, "listening machines" (speech-to-text conversion) for the deaf, and computer- controlled orthotic devices for paraplegic individuals result in a growing perception that primary disabilities do not necessarily impart handicaps.
www.kurzweilai.net /articles/art0274.html   (6621 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines Article, TheAgeSpiritualMachines Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The Age Of Spiritual Machines is a book by futurist Ray Kurzweil about the future course of humanity,particularly relating to the development of artificialintelligence.
Originally published in 1999, the book makes rather bold predictions that machines with human-like intelligence will beavailable from affordable computing devices within a couple of decades, revolutionising most aspects of life, and that eventuallyhumanity and its machinery will become one and the same.
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www.anoca.org /book/album/the_age_of_spiritual_machines.html   (204 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Are We Spiritual Machines?: Ray Kurzweil vs. the Critics of Strong A.I. The Next Fifty Years : Science in the First Half of the Twenty-first Century (Vintage)
Now he offers a framework for envisioning the twenty-first century--an age in which the marriage of human sensitivity and artificial intelligence fundamentally alters and improves the way we live.
Optimistic and challenging, thought-provoking and engaging, The Age of Spiritual Machines is the ultimate guide on our road into the next century.
www.literacyconnections.com /0_0140282025.html   (890 words)

  
 Excerpt: The Age of Spiritual Machines
These cities were constructed as war machines with defensive walls protected by armies utilizing weapons drawn from the most advanced technologies of their time, including chariots, spears, armor, and bows and arrows.
Perhaps the most significant invention of the late Middle Ages was Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the movable-type printing press, which opened intellectual life beyond an elite controlled by church and state.
In the 1780s, machines were invented to card and comb the wool to feed the new automated spinning machines.
pages.emerson.edu /Courses/fall00/in115d/whatistechnology.htm   (3488 words)

  
 Ray Kurzweil - The Age of Spiritual Machines   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Kurzweil looks into the future having taken a running start from the big bang, gaining speed through the evolution of man, then computers to the present day and jumping into the new century (written in 1999).
Further, it will be much more efficient for machines to do most things than for humans to do it...
He was a year off of predicting the time of computers defeating chess champions, personal identity verification was on track and continuous speech recognition was a few years late.
www-personal.umich.edu /~esayers/age-of-spiritual-machines.htm   (668 words)

  
 The Age of Spiritual Machines part X - "Chronology" - pages from Ray Kurzweil's novel
This is the age of the Enlightenment, a philosophical movement to restore the supremacy of human reason, knowledge, and freedom, with parallel developments in science and theology.
Richard Arkwright, the founder of the modern factory system, patents a hydraulic spinning machine that is too large and expensive to use in family dwellings.
He builds a factory for his machine in 1781, thereby paving the way for many of the economic and social changes that will characterize the Industrial Revolution.
www.beachbrowser.com /Archives/Science-and-Health/June-99/the-age-of-intelligent-machines-part-10.htm   (1853 words)

  
 Essay on The Age of Spiritual Machines, by Ray Kurzweil. This report gives a basic summary of a very technical book on ...
Essay on The Age of Spiritual Machines, by Ray Kurzweil.
The Age of Spiritual Machines, by Ray Kurzweil.
This report gives a basic summary of a very technical book on A.I. The first five chapters of this book provide the foundation for Ray Kurzweil to issue his predictions later in the book.
www.dedicatedwriters.com /paper/The_Age_of_Spiritual_Machines-135697.html   (287 words)

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