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Topic: The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia


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  Republic of Macedonia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Republic of Macedonia remained at peace through the Yugoslav wars of the early 1990s but was destabilized by the Kosovo War in 1999, when an estimated 360,000 ethnic Albanian refugees from Kosovo took refuge in the country.
The Republic of Macedonia is a parliamentary democracy with an executive government composed of a coalition of parties from the unicameral legislature (Собрание, Sobranie), and an independent judicial branch with a constitutional court.
Macedonia's terrain is mostly rugged, located between the Šar and Rhodope mountains around the valley of the Vardar river.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Republic_of_Macedonia   (3048 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Macedonia
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (Macedonian Republika Makedonija), country in southeastern Europe, on the Balkan Peninsula.
In April 1993 the United Nations (UN) admitted the republic under the temporary name of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) until a settlement with Greece could be reached.
It is bounded on the north by Serbia, one of the constituent republics of Serbia and Montenegro; on the east by Bulgaria; on the south by Greece; and on the west by Albania.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761555941   (1140 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Republic of Macedonia Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Republic contains roughly 38% of the area and nearly 44% of the population of the geographical region known as Macedonia, the remainder of which is divided between neighbouring Greece (with about half of the total) and Bulgaria (with under a tenth).
Between 1945 and 1991, the Socialist Republic of Macedonia was one of the six constituent republics of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The Republic of Macedonia is a parliamentary democracy with an executive government composed of a coalition of parties from the unicameral legislative (Собрание, Sobranje), and an independent judicial branch with a constitutional court.
www.ipedia.com /republic_of_macedonia.html   (914 words)

  
 USAID: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Maintenance of stability in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (Macedonia) is a key element of U.S. Government efforts to reduce instability in the Balkans region.
Macedonia identifies with western interests and values; e.g., supporting NATO, and hosting thousands of Kosovo refugees during the 1999 conflict with Yugoslavia at significant cost economically, and at cost to its generally friendly relationship with neighboring Yugoslavia.
Macedonia’s policies and institutions are not yet sufficient to ensure consolidation of its transition to a fully democratic, market economy.
www.usaid.gov /pubs/bj2001/ee/mk   (1207 words)

  
 Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia - Country information - Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Australia recognised the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia on 15 February 1994, using the nomenclature the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia in accordance with the terminology used by the United Nations.
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was admitted to the UN in 1993 with the compromise name of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia is one of the poorest countries in Europe.
www.dfat.gov.au /geo/fyrom/fyrom_brief.html   (2158 words)

  
 The_Former_Yugoslav_Republic_Macedonia_CBC_3
ECRI also encourages the authorities of “the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” in their intention to withdraw the reservation made to the European Convention on Nationality relating to the length of the period of residency necessary before an individual may lodge an application for naturalisation.
In its second report on “the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia”, ECRI encouraged the authorities to ensure the full implementation of criminal legislation specifying the right for members of minority groups to use their language during all stages of the pre-trial and trial process.
The authorities of “the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia” have informed ECRI that they are aware of these problems and are undertaking efforts to open new classes in the Turkish language of instruction and to finance the printing of textbooks and reference literature in the Turkish language.
www.coe.int /t/E/human_rights/ecri/1-ECRI/2-Country-by-country_approach/FYROM/The_Former_Yugoslav_Republic_Macedonia_CBC_3.asp   (10722 words)

  
 e_you
- Foreign Minister Ilinka MITREVA represents "the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" in the Committee of Ministers.
"The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" is represented in the Parliamentary Assembly by a
The contribution of "the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" is € 228 178.56 (i.e.
www.coe.int /T/e/com/about_coe/member_states/e_you.asp   (400 words)

  
 Concluding Observations/Comments - The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as a successor State recognized the obligations of the Former Yugoslav Federation and on 12 December 1994 became a State party to the Convention.
Accordingly, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia continues to recognize the competence of the Committee against Torture with regard to articles 20, 21 and 22 of the Convention.
The commitment of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to respect the principles and the norms contained in the Convention by including extensive training of police and medical personnel in its system of education and reeducation.
www.hri.ca /fortherecord1999/documentation/tbodies/cat-c-mac.htm   (647 words)

  
 macedonia . org
The Republic of Macedonia is a Southeast European country, north of Greece and west of Bulgaria.
Macedonian is the official language of the country and it is also spoken by the Macedonian minorities in Greece, Bulgaria, and Albania, and by the Macedonian Diaspora around the world.
Macedonia is known for hospitality, rich culture and history, and love for good wine and great traditional food.
www.macedonia.org   (157 words)

  
 NATO Fact sheets: Facts and Figures - the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia is a Partner country of NATO and an active participant in the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC) and the Partnership for Peace (PfP).
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia is beneficiary of aid from NATO and NATO member countries in the form of Partnership for Peace assistance and bilateral provision of equipment and material.
KFOR has contributed on several occasions with the evacuation to Skopje hospitals of members of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia army that were injured in clashes with the so-called NLA.
www.nato.int /docu/facts/2001/ff-macedonia.htm   (1899 words)

  
 NATO Partnerships   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Statement by the President of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, H.E. Gligorov at the Meeting of Heads of States and Governments of member-countries of the Council of Euro-Atlantic Partnership in Madrid, Spain.
Presentation by Minister for Foreign Affairs of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Dr. Blagoj Handziski at the Meeting of the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council on the level of Ministers of Foreign Affairs in Luxembourg.
Ljuben Paunoski, the Minister of Defence of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.
www.nato.int /pfp/mk/fyrom.htm   (296 words)

  
 Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Republic of), Landmine Monitor Report 2003
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYR Macedonia) acceded to the Mine Ban Treaty on 9 September 1998, becoming a State Party on 1 March 1999.
FYR Macedonia’s 15 April 2003 Article 7 Report confirms destruction of these remaining mines, although it does not itemize the quantity of each type destroyed, and no mention is made of the additional fuzes and detonators.
FYR Macedonia’s landmine and unexploded ordnance (UXO) problem is largely the result of a conflict that broke out in early 2001 between Albanian insurgents (NLA) and FYR Macedonia government security forces.
www.icbl.org /lm/2003/macedonia.html   (2667 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | World | Europe | Country profiles | Country profile: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
Macedonia was spared the inter-ethnic violence that raged elsewhere in the Balkans following the break-up of Yugoslavia in the early 1990s but it came close to civil war a decade after independence.
Recognition of the republic's progress from the brink of civil war came in December 2005 when the EU leaders agreed that it should become a candidate for membership.
A former centre-left prime minister and leader of the Social Democratic Union, Branko Crvenkovski moved on from both jobs when he was elected president in April 2004 two months after his predecessor, Boris Trajkovski, died in a plane crash.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/world/europe/country_profiles/1067125.stm   (624 words)

  
 Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of
Macedonia is a parliamentary democracy with multiethnic party representation and a popularly elected president.
Former Minister of Interior Boskovski, changing his account of the incident several times, claimed that the seven men had ambushed four police officers, and that in returning fire, the police killed all of their assailants.
The FWA allowed for ethnic minority groups to display their national emblems, next to the emblem of the Republic of Macedonia, on local public buildings in municipalities in which they are a local majority; however, the Government had not implemented the legislation by year's end.
www.state.gov /g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2003/27852.htm   (13408 words)

  
 The World Bank Group Countries: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYR Macedonia) is a landlocked country of 2.1 million people living on 26,000 square kilometers of territory located in the heart of the Balkans.
FYR Macedonia's GNP per capita was estimated at $1,290 in 1998, but has since declined due to the economic impact of the Kosovo crisis.
The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was put into an extraordinary situation due to Kosovo crisis and a dramatic inflow of close to 260,000 Kosovar refugees which arrived in the country between March 24, 1999 and the end of the bombing campaign.
www.worldbank.org /html/extdr/kosovo/macecb.htm   (1524 words)

  
 INOGATE - The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (F.Y.R.O.M.)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In the early 1990's as Macedonia transitioned from a socialist system to a market oriented economy, there was high annual inflation (topping 1,780% in 1992), the loss of the former Yugoslav and Soviet markets, and an increase in unemployment.
Macedonia is undertaking substantial reforms in its economic and political systems, making it ripe for increased levels of foreign investment.
Former state-owned enterprises are almost completely privatized, and the government is currently beginning the process with the energy monopoly.
www.inogate.org /html/countries/fyrom.htm   (1036 words)

  
 Foreign & Commonwealth Office Country Profiles
President Trajkovski promulgated an amnesty for former NLA fighters and an enhanced mission of international monitors was deployed to facilitate both the return of displaced people to their homes and of the Macedonian police to the conflictive areas.
Macedonia was the first candidate for a Stabilisation and Association Agreement with the EU, signed on 9 April 2001.
The OSCE 'Spillover Mission', established in Skopje in November 1992 with the aim of preventing the breakdown in the rest of the former Yugoslavia spreading to Macedonia, has continued to monitor ethnic and wider political divisions in the country, and is playing a key part in the post-conflict confidence-building process.
www.fco.gov.uk /servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029394365&a=KCountryProfile&aid=1019233917528   (2924 words)

  
 former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the IMF -- Page 1 of 4
On behalf of: Republic of Armenia, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus, Georgia, Republic of Croatia, Israel, Republic of Moldova, former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Kingdom of the Netherlands-Netherlands, Romania, Ukraine.
On behalf of: Republic of Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cyprus, Georgia, Republic of Croatia, Israel, Republic of Moldova, former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Kingdom of the Netherlands-Netherlands, Romania, Ukraine.
This Letter of Intent of the government of Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia describes the policies that Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia intends to implement in the context of its request for financial support from the IMF.
www.imf.org /external/country/MKD   (756 words)

  
 WTO | Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) - Member information
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and the WTO
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) has been a member of WTO since 4 April 2003.
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia became the 146th Member of the World Trade Organization
www.wto.org /english/thewto_e/countries_e/macedonia_e.htm   (284 words)

  
 State Department: Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia - Public Announcement, May 28, 1999
Because of the nature of the demonstration, the Department of State authorized on March 25 the departure from the FYR of Macedonia of U.S. Embassy Skopje personnel in non-emergency positions and the family members of Embassy personnel.
Americans choosing to remain in the FYR of Macedonia should avoid crowds and demonstrations, keep a low profile, and stay alert for changes in the security situation.
For further general information on travel to the FYR of Macedonia, consult the latest Department of State Consular Information Sheet for the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.
www.hri.org /docs/USSD-Travel/FYROM.1999-05-28.html   (295 words)

  
 Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia: Impunity threatens lasting peace
Amnesty International remains concerned that the human rights abuses committed during the conflict by both sides have not been subjected to investigation and are not likely to be effectively investigated in most cases.
The recent spate of assassinations of former NLA members by rival Albanians in the run up to the elections to be held in September underscores the need for all parties to respect human rights.
Some of the research for the report was carried out in Macedonia in June and November 2001.
www.amnestyusa.org /regions/europe/document.do?id=80256AB9000584F680256C1000550341   (841 words)

  
 UNICEF - The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia -
UNICEF - The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia -
TETOVO, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, 11 November 2005 — A team of travelling teachers is visiting Valbone Mandzukai’s family, to teach her 7-year-old son how to read and write.
SKOPJE, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, 4 October 2005 — Ljubche Dimoska has come a long way since leaving a state-run institution for the disabled in The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.
www.unicef.org /infobycountry/TFYRMacedonia_newsline.html   (142 words)

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